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Professional Development Presentation

Transcript: Relationships Response Toyota of Plano. (n.d.) Creating an Effective Classroom Learning Environment KEEP CALM CAUSE I HAVE A PLAN. (n.d.). Retrieved June 22, 2016, from http:// www.keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk/p/keep-calm-cause-i-have-a-plan/ Play, Learn and Grow… Together! (n.d.). Retrieved June 22, 2016, from http:// earlylearningworkshop.com/play-learn-and-grow-together/ Sue Larkey - autism and aspergers training and resources. (n.d.). Retrieved June 22, 2016, from http://www.suelarkey.co.nz/shopping/pgm-more_information.php?id=121 Toyota of Plano. (n.d.). Retrieved June 22, 2016, from http://toyotaofplano.net/? p=883 “Teachers absolutely must be actively involved in engaging students in dialogue about classroom behavior issues prior to and along with interventions provided by outside support” (Jones & Jones, 2015, p. 322). Image “If children and youth are not taught how to meet behavioral expectations in classroom environments, then behavioral delinquency is likely to persist” (Banks & Obiakor, 2015, p. 85). Behavior Change Plans Increasing Motivation Create clear goals but tangible results related to the goal (Wiggins, 2012). Clarify the children understand the expectations. Be specific and concrete as possible. Jones & Jones (2015) suggests goal setting in the sense it is a form of choice enhances the sense of optimism and self-satisfaction. Feedback is a powerful tool that influences learning and achievement in any field, especially in education as an administrator, teacher, or student. Children build on their strengths and need teachers to recognize and encourage them through the power of reinforcing language (Responsive Classroom, 2015). Intrinsic rewards are so much more satisfying because the feeling of accomplishment cannot be replaced (Taylor, McNaney-Funk, Jardine, Lehman, & Fok-Chan, 2014). Jones, Bailey & Jacob (2014) state that teachers need knowledge about student behavior and development and they need familiarity and practice with strategies that have been proven to work. EDUC 6657 by Shannon Prisco References According to researchers and studies, classroom management issues tend to be a leading cause of teacher stress and burnout as teachers often feel alone to handle the challenges (Reinke, Herman, & Stormont, 2013). Expectations Classroom Management Jones & Jones (2015) believes it is important for teachers to teach students how to manage their own behaviors and take ownership of their actions. All students should feel safe and valued (Jones & Jones, 2015, p. 7). There should be a respectful relationship between the students and teacher. Create a strong link between academic success and social-emotional learning, which Responsive Classroom (2015) believes that high-quality education for every child is built on the foundation of a safe and joyful learning community. Some of my writing risk takers that felt comfortable and excited to share their writing Understanding Student Needs Jones, Bailey & Jacob (2014) state that teachers need knowledge about student behavior and development and they need familiarity and practice with strategies that have been proven to work. Changing the learning environment and employing classroom management strategies to meet the diverse needs of the students is not something that comes easily to an educator, it takes time, research and experience. Educators should be sensitive and take time to understand each student's diverse needs and interests to create a motivating, successful learning experience. Classroom Management Simulation (2015) students can mark the results of their progress and celebrate when they improve. Gradually the student can increase the number of times they must obtain their goal before they have a celebration. Positives: Students monitor their progress, collect data, individualized (focusing on specific goals), increases motivation, and works towards appropriate behavior Behavior Contracts Positive Relationships with Families Studies have proven that when the parents are involved, teachers develop trust in parents and their students, and their higher levels of trust lead teachers to develop a more humanistic orientation towards their students (Karakus & Savas, 2012). Students learn from their parents, if they see an effective working relationship with their parent and teacher, they will indeed follow the same path. Strong communication with parents connects home and school. Student learning is enhanced when students and teachers work together (Jones & Jones, 2015). Suggested Activities: Introductory Letter Friday or Monthly Letters Calls home (positive and negative feedback) Invite parents in the classroom (shows, occupation sharing, etc.) Back-to-school night and fall/spring conferences Data binders (progress reports) Classroom website References Banks, T., & Obiakor, F. E. (2015). Culturally responsive positive behavior supports: Considerations for practice. Journal of Education and Training Studies, 3(2), 83–90. Retrieved from Increasing

Professional Development Presentation

Transcript: The Perkins Act Authorized Federal Funds to support vocational programs Special needs students must be provided equal access to recruitment, enrollment and placement activities in vocational activities HISTORICAL CHANGES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (CONT.) Buckley Amendment Gives parents of students under the age of 18, the right to examine records kept in the students personal file Mandates annual parents right’s given Informed Consent Importance for L.R.E. Least Restricted Environment Importance for L.E.P. Limited English Proficient Nondiscriminatory Evaluation Assessment in all areas related to suspected disability Test given/Reports written in native language Due Process P.L. 99-457 EHA AMMENDMENTS (1986) SECTION 504 OF THE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION ACT (1973) Clip art. Copyright @ 1987-1999. Microsoft Corporation. Crane, L. (2002). Mental retardation: A community integration approach. Belmont, CA: Thomason Publishing. GCU. (2012). SPE 529 Lecture. Retrieved from www.gcu.edu. Katsiyannis, A., Yell, M.L., & Bradley, R. (2001). Reflection on the 25th anniversary of the Individual with Disabilities Education Act. Remedial and Special Education, 22, 234-334. HISTORICAL CHANGES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION WHAT IS SPECIAL EDUCATION ? HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF SPECIAL EDUCATION HISTORICAL OVERVIEW OF SPECIAL EDUCATION REFERENCE (S) MENTAL RETARDATION LEARNING DISABILITIES EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE DEAF/HEARING IMPAIRMENTS ORTHOPEDIC IMPAIRMENTS VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS OTHER HEALTH IMPAIRMENTS AUTISM TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY SPEECH OR LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENTS MULTIPLE DISABILITIES HISTORY OF SPECIAL EDUCATION CONT. Since the mid 1970’s services to children with special needs has changed dramatically: More appropriate services Collaboration between special education classes and general education setting Parental advocacy Legislation and Litigation Special funding for programs THE INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES EDUCATION ACT: IDEA (1997) BROWN VS. BOARD OF EDUCATION OF TOPEKA, KANSAS (1954) STATE / FEDERAL LAWS IDEA/ADA DIFFERENCE NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT (NCLB) (2001) ADVOCATION FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS FOR PARENTS HISTORY OF SPECIAL EDUCATION Education designed to meet the individual needs of children with disabilities. Disability is defined as any restriction or lack (resulting from an impairment) of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being. Expanded incentives for Pre-School Special Education programs, early intervention and transition programs Free Appropriate Public Education (F.A.P.E.) to children with disabilities age three through five years old Federal Laws are passed by congress and are based on provisions of the Constitution. State constitutions may go beyond what is provided in the federal law, as long as there is no conflict between them Laws provide a framework for policy and regulations provide the specific requirement for implementing policy Protects all individuals with disabilities from discrimination and requires most employers to make reasonable modifications for them Plays important role in: Transitional services for a student with a disability Making sure all school buildings are accessible P.L. 93-380: THE FAMILY EDUCATION RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (1974) REFERENCE (S) CONT. Cheryl Y Ray November 21, 2012 SPE 529N Professor: Diane Coughlin Even Though Many Dramatic Changes Have Been Made Over The Years For Students With Special Needs: There Are Still Many Things That Need To Be Done. With Parent Advocacy and Highly Trained Professionals Special Needs Students Will Continue To Have The Education They Deserve P.L. 94-142: EDUCATION OF ALL HANDICAPPED CHILDREN’S ACT (1975) Disproportionate representation of African American students in Special Education The court determined that IQ test were discriminatory against African American students STEPS THAT CAN BE TAKEN: Services for students evolved in four distinct phases (Polloway, Smith, Patton & Smith, 1996).: Relative isolation: The first 70 years in the 20th century, the students were denied access to public education or taught in isolated classrooms Integration:Began in the 1970’s students were integrated in the general education setting when appropriate Inclusion:Began in the 1980’s with emphasis that all students with disabilities be included in all school programs and activities Empowerment and Self-Determination: Inclusion efforts to best prepare the student for the highest degree of independence The only resources for most parents were private educational schools paid by the parents Many students with special needs were only taught in self-contained classrooms Typically, children with mental retardation or sensory deficits were placed in residential programs (Crane, 2002). It is estimated that in 1965, 100,000 children from birth to 21 years old were placed in mental institutions in the U.S. ( White, Lakin, Bruininks, & Li, 1991). In many cases students with special needs stayed home and received no formal

Professional Development Presentation

Transcript: When typical classroom system is not enough: complete a classroom behavior assessment-use this data to create a behavior intervention plan (BIP) BIP- includes changes in classroom environment, instructional modifications and behavioral/motivational strategies Response to Behavior Classroom management is one of the most difficult elements of teaching and the most difficult skill for teachers to master. Creating a safe, supportive classroom is a major factor in increasing student motivation, achievement and behavior (Jones & Jones, 2016). Effective managment is contingent upon: developing student-teacher relationship, creating a strong classroom community, setting high expectations and having consistent routines (Jones, Jones, & Vermette, 2013). Create clear expectations during the morning meeting Involve students in the creation of the class rules as it gives them a sense of belonging and power Expectations should be stated in a positive manner, be developmentally appropriate and explicitly taught and reinforced Post the expectations in a visible area of the room Give students a copy of the expectations to keep in their planner; send a copy home with parents to sign Review the rules periodically and when a new student is enrolled Review academic and behavioral expectations when introducing a lesson (Jones & Jones, 2016) (Reinke, Herman & Stormont, 2013) Establishing Positive Teacher-Student Relationships Understanding Student Needs Effective Feedback 80% of students respond to strong Tier 1 classroom behavior management systems Tier 2 interventions focus on teaching strategies and supporting at-risk students ( low academic success, poor home environments and/or poor peer interactions) Tier 1 support must be implemented with fidelity and effective before referring a student to a Tier 2 intervention Tier 3 interventions require the creation and implementation of an individual behavioral change plan (Carter, Carter, Johnson, & Pool, 2012) Banks, T., & Obiakor, F. E. (2015). Culturally responsive positive behavior supports: Considerations for practice. Journal of Education and Training Studies, 3(2), 83-90. Retrieved from http://www.redframe.com/journal/index.php/jets/article/view/636 Brown, M. R. (2007). Educating all students: Creating culturally responsive teachers, classrooms, and schools. Intervention in School and Clinic, 43(1), 57-62. Carter, D. R., Carter, G. M., Johnson, E. S., & Pool, J. L. (2013). Systematic implementation of a tier 2 behavior intervention. Intervention in School and Clinic, 48(4), 223-231. Eisenman, G., Edwards, S., & Cushman, C. A. (2015). Bringing reality to classroom management in teacher education. Professional Educator, 39(1), 1-13. Gonzalez, R. L., & Jackson, C. L. (2013). Engaging with parents: The relationship between school engagement efforts, social class, and learning. School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 24(3), 316-335. Jones, K. A., Jones, J. L., & Vermette, P. J. (2013). Exploring the complexity of classroom management: 8 components of managing a highly productive, safe, and respectful urban environment. American Secondary Education, 41(3), 21-33. Creating Positive Peer Relationships Students' perceptions of themselves as learners is contingent upon quality feedback (Jones & Jones, p. 264). Feedback should be: given in a timely manner provide compliments as well as correction be sensitive to the needs of the individual students Strategies for effective feedback (Reynolds, 2013): hold individual conferences use rubrics that provide specific performance items use formative assessments regularly to let students know how they are performing with regard to a specific skill or target give genuine praise use post-it notes and place on student's desk for immediate feedback without disrupting the lesson provide a model or example of acceptable work Problem Solving Classroom Management Presentation School-wide Behavior Expectations: 4 Principles of Effective Classroom Management: Requires planning and preparation Built upon quality relationships Supports a consistent set of routines and structures Includes ongoing observation and data collection. Teachers need to assess management strategies and make adaptations as needed (Jones, Bailey & Jacob, 2014) References: • Blue Ribbon Kid activity (Jones & Jones, p.104)- This strategy, commonly called Student of the Week, celebrates each child’s uniqueness, giving them the spotlight. It allows each student to share his or her talents, family photos and memorabilia, helping students learn more about one another. Adding personalized compliments fosters class unity and feelings of acceptance. • Identifying similarities and differences- This strategy is particularly important to implement with students of various diversities. Students work in groups to list their talents and skills. These are then shared with their group and they create a Venn diagram of similarities and differences. This strategy supports the development of

Professional Development Presentation

Transcript: Students are safe and valued Students are learning Students are supported Students are working collaboratively Students are being taught from a well thought-out lesson plan Behavior expectations should be consistent from teacher to teacher and from place to place. Consistency aids a student in knowing that expectations are the same for all students, by all teachers, and reinforced by all staff members (Anderson, Horner, Rodriguez, Stiller, 2013). Strategies for increasing motivation: Pride Bucks Student of the months School Dances Instrinsic satisfaction Strategies for providing effective feedback: Use rubrics to communicate expectations Use immediate and specific feedback Use progress reports to share academic feedback PBIS World. (2018). Rewards, simple reward systems, & incentives. Retrieved from http://www.pbisworld.com/tier-1/rewards-simple-reward-systems-incentives/. Individual Behavior Change Plans School-Wide Behavior Expectations (Jones & Jones, 2016 Individual Behavior Change Plans EDUC 6657 Strategies for developing positive peer relationships: Class Meetings Brain Breaks Think-Pair-Share Intentional collaborative grouping AVID appointment books $1.25 Sunday, March 4, 2018 Transition Strategies Walden University Positive teacher-student relationships References Anderson, C. M., Horner, R. H., Rodriguez, B., & Stiller, B. (2013). Building systems for successful implementations of function-based support in schools [Journal]. International Journal of School & Educational Psychology, 1, 141-153. https://doi.org/10.1080/21683603.2013.804798 Kuru Cetin, S., & Taskin, P. (2016). Parent Involvement in Education in Terms of Their Socio-Economic Status. Eurasian Journal Of Educational Research, (66), 105-122. Some strategies that can help with establishing positive relationships are: greeting students at the door, sending positive notes home, having high expectations, being culturally sensitive, and knowing the content (so students will trust you) "Approximately 30 major transitions each day in elementary classrooms account for nearly 15% of classroom time" (Jones & Jones, 2016, p. 206) The quality of relationships students have with their peers has a significant impact on how safe and supportive they find their classroom and school (Jones & Jones, 2016, p. 127) (Jones & Jones, 2016) Moldule VII, Wk. viii Dr. Ernest Palestis Jones, V., & Jones, L. (2016). Comprehensive classroom management: Creating communities of support and solving problems (11th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson "Adolescents learn best through active engagement with ideas, the environment, and other learners" (National Middle School Association, 2010) Creating positive relationships Positive teacher–student relationships are a centerpiece of classrooms and schools focused on reducing the negative impact trauma has on students’ schools success! Positive Family Relationships Some effective transition strategies: Post daily agenda with time stamps Have materials prepared and ready Concise step-by-by directions Classroom set up conducive for efficient movement Practiced procedures and expectations Lillian Gregory Jones, V., & Jones, L. (2016). Comprehensive classroom management: Creating communities of support and solving problems (11th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Positive Peer Relationships (Jones & Jones, 2016) Jones, V., & Jones, L. (2016). Comprehensive classroom management: Creating communities of support and solving problems (11th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Problem Solving Glasser's Seven Steps to Effective Problem Solving Personal student-teacher relationship Deal with present behavior Valuable Judgement Make a plan Make a committment Follow-up Flexibilityy I'm not saying I'm gonna change the world, but I guarantee that I will spark the brain that will change the world -Tupac Shakur “Rules and procedures should be developed in conjunction with teaching strategies that enhance active and meaningful student engagement in the learning process, relate to students’ cultural backgrounds and interests, and help develop students’ higher-level thinking skills” (Jones & Jones, 2016, pg. 171). In order to develop successful school-wide behavior plans, a team of staff members, consisting of the administration, teachers, and specialists, determine “3-5 behavioral expectations that suit the needs of their school” (PBIS World, 2018) Students deserve to feel safe, valued, respected, and like human-beings. Students deserve to be understood. Student deserve to be around an adult who cares about them. Overall Classroom Management Kuru Cetin, S., & Taskin, P. (2016). Parent Involvement in Education in Terms of Their Socio-Economic Status. Eurasian Journal Of Educational Research, (66), 105-122. Response to Behavior & Problem Solving (Jones & Jones, 2016) Effective Classroom Management looks like: Classroom Expectations Strategies for developing positive family relationships: Weekly progress reports Initial parent phone call home

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