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Museum Exhibit

Transcript: What are the 3 subatomic particles? protons neutrons and electrons Dalton's theory was different that it had the weight of careful chemical measurements behind it. The Greeks theory was that was a philosophical statement that there are atoms because there must be atoms. What is the Atomic theory? today's theories Modern atomic theory is, of course, a little more involved than Dalton's theory but the essence of Dalton's theory remains valid. Who is John Dalton Museum Exhibit Why is it different from all others? Who came up with the atomic theory? what is the theory based on atomic theory is based on scientific evidence available at any given time and serves to suggest future lines of research about atoms. John Dalton is credited with pioneering modern atomic theory. He was also the first to study color blindness His theory was material containing statements about atoms that could be tested experimentally. When? What was his theory a about? How is it useful in science? the atomic theory is used for experiments that can actually be tested.Also for scientists can study atoms and put the relation in with chemistry. Atomic Theory? Is the Scientific theory of the nature of matter. states that matter is made up of small particles called atoms In 1803 while noting that oxygen and carbon combine make two compounds.This led him to propose the Law of Simple Multiple Proportions, which was later verified by the Swedish chemist Berzelius. In an attempt to explain how and why elements would combine with one another in fixed ratios and sometimes also in multiples of those ratios, Dalton formulated his atomic theory. John Dalton what is the charge of an atom? Neutral the theory is about matter is made up of tiny indivisible particles . The modern version, the atoms of each element are effectively identical.

Museum Exhibit

Transcript: Working Conditions Protests Achievements from Protest By: Jake Sun Working Conditions Mines and corollaries act passed from the government in 1842 prohibited all girls and boys under ten years old from working underground in coal mines in 1841, about 216,000 people were employed in mines. Women and children worked for 11 to 12 hours a day for smaller wages than man In 1838, after an accident at Huskar Colliery in Silkstone, the public became aware of conditions in collieries Combination Act in 1799, the Prime Minister decided to take action against political agitation among industrial workers an act to prevent unlawful combinations of workmen prohibited trade unions and collective bargaining by British workers. Under what conditions did factory workers work? in extremely poor conditions using building materials that were the cheapest a builder could find (the cities needed cheap homes as the Industrial Revolution continued to grow) worked with few building regulations and those that did exist were also ignored How long did factory workers work? 14 to 16 hours a day for six days a week workers only received a break for lunch and a break for dinner Research Question The passing of this act did not mean that the mistreatment to children stopped instantly. However, this act was important because this impacted the idea of the workers that things can be changed. Six main aims of the movement: 1. a vote for all men (over 21) 2. the secret ballot 3. no property qualification to become a Member of Parliament (MP) 4. payment for MPs 5. electoral districts of equal size 6. annual elections for Parliament How much did the factory workers get paid? at a conference in 1872, chandelier maker from Birmingham stated that unskilled workers only received about 10 cents an hour (West Midlands History) skilled workers earned a little more but the amount was not that significant Safety standards? Some factories in the UK had wet floors covered in oil and water from machines “The floors were oily and if you slipped when you were piecing your ends up, you’d go straight over the top.” (cotton mill worker) The sanitary conditions were also bad, as there were not enough toilets in the factories (a block of 40 houses would have possibly 6 toilets for all persons) “Life in Industrial Towns.” History Learning Site, www.historylearningsite.co.uk/britain-1700-to-1900/industrial-revolution/life-in-industrial-towns/. “Working Practices and Conditions in the Birmingham Brass Industry.” Revolutionary Players, www.revolutionaryplayers.org.uk/working-practices-and-conditions-in-the-birmingham-brass-industry/. “Working and Living Conditions.” The Industrial Revolution, firstindustrialrevolution.weebly.com/working-and-living-conditions.html. “Children & Cotton - Learning Zone for Social Studies & Citizenship.” Children & Cotton - Learning Zone for Social Studies & Citizenship, www.newlanark.org/learningzone/clitp-dangerinthemill.php. “Working Conditions in Factories & Creations of Unions.” Pinterest, www.pinterest.com/kenluuu/working-conditions-in-factories-creations-of-union/. “The National Archives Learning Curve | Power, Politics and Protest | The Chartists.” Home - The National Archives, www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/education/politics/g7/. “Childhood and Child Labour in Industrial England: Diversity and Agency, 1750-1914.” EHnet, eh.net/book_reviews/childhood-and-child-labour-in-industrial-england-diversity-and-agency-1750-1914/. “Senghenydd Colliery Disaster.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senghenydd_colliery_disaster. “BBC - History - British History in Depth: The Chartist Movement 1838 - 1848.” BBC News, BBC, www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/victorians/chartist_01.shtml. “The 1833 Factory Act.” UK Parliament, www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/transformingsociety/livinglearning/19thcentury/overview/factoryact/. “10 Hours Movement.” 10 Hours Movement, www.industrialrevolution.org/10-hours-movement.html. (John@spartacus-educational.com), John Simkin. “Spartacus Educational.” Spartacus Educational, Spartacus Educational, spartacus-educational.com/Lcombination25.htm. Industrial Revolution What impact did the Industrial Revolution have on workers in major cities in the UK? Working Conditions The Factory act passed from the government in 1833 young children were working very long hours in workplaces where conditions were often terrible. The basic act was as follows: no child workers under nine years of age employers must have an age certificate for their child workers children of 9-13 years to work no more than nine hours a day children of 13-18 years to work no more than 12 hours a day children are not to work at night two hours schooling each day for children four factory inspectors appointed to enforce the law Industrial Disasters Achievements of Protest Injuries during work? the factories were designed based on machines not for the workers there were frequent injuries during the work day smoke spit out from the

Museum Exhibit Design

Transcript: Keep it Professional Indianapolis Museum of Art, Modern art display techniques Exhibits are great methods of communication, they "speak to the eyes" We can talk about important subjects in as a 3D, interactive journey You control how your objects will communicate your message. How do you want to do that? Questions? (Yes, I am Mrs. Cardenas' sister, so don't bother asking that one.) Examples Cabinet of Curiosities. The first "museum" Who is our audience? What are the 'Key Messages'?: What information do we want our visitors to remember when they leave? What is the purpose of our exhibit? How long will this exhibit take to make? Do we have enough time? This information would be put into an "exhibit brief" that helps the team understand the main ideas of the exhibit. Arizona Science Center, Interactive display techniques You are trying to help someone learn something new Not too many distracting colors, shapes, or interactives Can you read your text aloud without stumbling? Can someone else understand your writing? If not, rewrite! No handwritten labels! They are hard to read Don't be afraid to be creative. Relax and remember that you have the talent and ability to produce something amazing! Be Inspired. Inspiration is everywhere, just look around you! Try, try, and try again. Rearrange, change a font or a color, or shorten your text until you have a design you are proud of. Katie Rush, M.A. Museum Studies Display is an important part of human behavior that we practice in our daily lives. What types of things do you have "on display" in your house? The History of Museum Exhibit Design Presentation is Key Tempe History Museum A Few Words of Advice From a Fellow Designer Dublin Museum of Natural History. 18th century display techniques; classification Getting Technical Readable Font in the Right Size Serif and Sans Serif fonts Title = 50-72 point font Text panel = 18-30 point font Object labels = 14-24 point font Color High contrast colors work best Keep your text short and simple Design Requirements Exhibit Design Before you design, ask yourself: Why Good Design is Important Phoenix Art Museum Attire -- you'll be taken more seriously with professional outfits Speaking -- slow down a little. If it seems a bit slow to you, the speaker, it is probably just right for the listener Share your 'behind-the-scenes' stories -- People LOVE to hear about the work that happens to make the exhibit come to fruition, or an interesting story about something not mentioned in the text panels.

Museum Exhibit

Transcript: Curator's notes Sure, they talk the same language, but they ain't’ the same. Look how they live. Think any of us folks’d live like that? Hell, no! The farmers move a long way from as far as Ohio all the way to California, New York and Washington. However, they are faced with not only financial problems but socializing problems. They do not have much money because they sold their farm at a ridiculously low price. They are also repellant from the locals because they are taking up any available jobs they could find. Hence it causes the wage drops drastically making it almost impossible to live on that pathetic amount of money. This museum exhibit depicts what exactly was the environment the farmers were living in. the Hoovervilles and how they support their family members financial by working very hard but still unpopular in the eyes of the locals. Hooverville line up a long line before California This poster was put up to intimidate the migrant farmers and let them know they are not welcome here. Some places like California and Washington have taken too much migrant workers that the locals are getting unemployed and the economic system is falling apart. (too little wage for workers, labor doesn't worth much) From: http://www.placestudies.com/taxonomy/term/1077?page=2 The farmers live in broken Hoovervilles, with roof stacked up with scrap stuff. This depicts the poverty the farmers had to face inorder to surivive in the new states. (no chickens or dogs can be seen in the picture) http://hoovervillehistory.tripod.com/ Goals HoovervilleStLouisEarly1930s-275.jpg Reaching the Goal A poster rejecting the migranting farmers from california

Museum Exhibit Design

Transcript: Choice of Technology Source: http://readwrite.com/2012/08/31/futurists-cheat-sheet-internet-of-things#awesm=~oevfWctmekPmbT Google Art project: http://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/project/art-project?hl=en The Future of Museums Source: http://mobileappsformuseums.wordpress.com/ The Internet of Things Know-how books 2011 2013 Source: http://shura.shu.ac.uk/554/ Design of Participation Museum Exhibit Design Source: Participation Design - online book: http://www.participatorymuseum.org/read/ 2010 Explore image source: http://mi9.com/wallpapers/3d-figures-wallpaper_16/ http://www.nodem.org/resources/knowhow-books/ Exploratorium: http://www.exploratorium.edu/explore/ American Museum of Natural History for Kids pages: http://www.amnh.org/explore/ology Museum3: http://museum3.org/ Web Exhibits: http://www.webexhibits.org/ Science Museum: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/ Computer History Museum: http://www.computerhistory.org/explore/ Virtual Maths Museum: http://virtualmathmuseum.org/gallery4.html Beauty in Maths: http://www.peterpappas.com/2011/11/illuminated-mathematics-students-find-beauty-humanity-intrigue.html Museum Beyond – ARG: http://museumbeyond.com/2011/12/09/museum-game-thought-experiment-part-2-arg-examples/ SCARLET project: http://teamscarlet.wordpress.com/ Kew: the exhibit Museum Exhibit Design NASA Beyond Planet Earth: http://www.amnh.org/explore/news-blogs/news-posts/download-the-beyond-planet-earth-ar-app-before-your-visit 360 Mars panorama: http://www.360cities.net/image/curiosity-rover-martian-solar-day-2#63.07,0.18,100.5 Eyes of the Solar System: http://eyes.nasa.gov/index.html + Curiosity app http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-07/nasas-spacecraft-3-d-app-offers-augmented-reality-ride-along-curiosity-grail 2012 Virtual Museums: http://v-must.net/virtual-museums/all 2012

Museum Exhibit

Transcript: Resources John Dalton is the scientist credited for proposing the atomic theory.It's different from other theories because in his theory the electron orbit the nucleus. We can distinguish them by their matter and uniform properties. Liquids Solids electrons in an atom are arranged in shells and sub-shells. Museum Exhibit For gas, atoms move around freely and hardly ever touch each other. Mater can be a solid,liquid,gas, and even plasma For a liquid atoms a lightly loosen and move a bit around. To create a solid atoms are tightly packed together and don't move. Electrons in zones close to the center are lower in energy than electrons in zones at greater distances from the center. According to Bohr, the amount of energy needed to move an electron from one zone to another is a fixed. These zones are known as energy levels (or sometimes called electron shells). How are electrons arranged in atoms? Thanks to atoms and electrons we are here on planet earth. How can we distinguish between substances? How do atoms combine to form matter? Gas This prezi shows that atoms can form matter in different ways. Matter made from those atoms are used in our everyday lives even in school.Atoms surround us every day and everywhere because everything is made up of atoms How and why do electrons move between energy levels? Atoms are the basic building block of everything. Atoms can create anything but this would involve the atoms to get into a arrangement. https://www.chem.purdue.edu/gchelp/liquids/character.html

Museum Exhibit

Transcript: Approximately a century ago, industrial development just exploited. People were moving to cities at an extraordinary and rapid way because there were plenty of opportunities for jobs. The industrial revolution, strongly affects how we live in this days. The Industrial Revolution in the United States made a vast difference to the way Americans live now. Before the industrial development, there were no machines that mass produced products, and the working conditions and living conditions were deplorable. Although during the Industrial Revolution workers and others were angry with the change that was occurring, they discovered then that scientific and technological developments would make their lives much easier. Scientific and technological discoveries are made every day, however, only some of those discoveries are practical enough to use in our everyday lives. Now it seems completely normal to have machines and robots to mass produce the products we use, but in the industrial revolution era it was a whole new world for people. The scientific innovations were not easily accepted, especially when it was for replacing workers. A relevant change that the industrial revolution made was the types of jobs that were developed so people could not also find a replace for their works that were been made by machines, but to help and contribute in the whole process of this explosion in industry. Before the boom in manufacturing, factory jobs were physically demanding, mainly hard jobs. These jobs were no longer to be seen after the industrial revolution. Rather than doing the job of the machine, employees would soon be required to do different skilled work, such as maintenance for the new machines. One of the major changes that were seen during and after the industrial revolution was that there were more women in the workplace, as there were high demands of labor. Unfortunately these jobs that were considered “women’s work” were severely underpaid and had poor safety regulations. Museum Exhibit In conclusion, and to finalize, it can be clearly stated that the Industrial Revolution in the United States it is strongly connected to the Statement of Inquiry which states that; Science and innovation can create a revolution within communities. Industrial Revolution in the US has proven to be a pivotal event for the humanity. This so-called, the second revolution, because it happened after the British one, changed for ever the course of the American nation. The US, now one of the most, if not the most important nations in the world in terms of economy, politics, society, is now what it is because what happened in their revolution. Before this huge change in society, it was normal to see people living mainly outside cities, making their own clothes, and living maximum up to 50 years. With this change in terms of science and innovations, people started to go to the cities in seek of a decent job that could increase their life quality, and because evolutions in medicine, the life expectancy increased. Science and innovation had a crucial role during this period of time, and it created a whole revolution in the American community because of the fact that it represented a whole new change in that time, and still it have an important role on our lives. The industrial revolution began from a transitional phase which was based on heavily machine base economy in England. This led to the growth of factories and the mass of production of goods. This chain of events made the price of goods drop significantly as machines made production much more efficient, therefore, cheaper. In this museum exhibit, it is going to be explained The Industrial Revolution in the United States which began in the years and decades following the end of the Civil War. Americans with power were building on the advancements made in Britain. In the coming years, new things were implemented in United States such as innovations in industry, which were a key part so they could become into the nation the U.K. had in an earlier era. Introduction Gabriel Parada 8-4 Effects in the present Conclusion Effects in the past One of the most significant results of the Industrial Revolution was the emergence of the middle class. As goods became cheaper because of the cheaper and more efficient production of goods, people could buy more of the good. They could buy everything they needed, and would have some money left over. As mentioned previously, production increased exponentially. More factories were built as efficient machines were invented. With machines that could mass-produce and a plethora of workers, factories could now produce much more than they could have before. Transportation and communication were drastically changed as well. Transporting goods, which used to take weeks, even months, now took days with steamboats, roads, canals, and railroads. Communication, which also took a long time to pass, could now be sent back and forth almost instantly. There was no time-lag

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