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Mental Illness Presentation

Transcript: Mental illness is a condition that affects how people think, interact, feel or behave (Nami.org). Treatments for children are ways to try to make the children under 18 years old think and act normally. Mental illness has been around for thousands of years, and different ancient civilizations think of mental illness differently. For example, the Hebrews believed that this is “an illness inflicted upon humans by Gods as punishment for committing sin” (Foerschner, 1). In the world of any given year, around 30% of the world’s population is affected by mental disorders, and over two thirds of them do no get proper treatment and the care they need. About 10% to 20% of all children are affected by some sort of mental illness, and only 15% to 30% of these children receive the proper treatments (Ngui, 2). Mental illness can be learned in Canada from a long time ago. Ever since the First Nations, until now, mental illness has always existed. While we have possible conclusions as to why mental illness exists now, people in the early history thought of everything differently. First Nations understood mental health as connected to the balance of the spiritual world, and to the balance of the forces in their everyday lives. (Moran) Therefore, they often held healing ceremonies to address physical and mental concerns. Because of the First Nations, they also caused the early European settlers to think the same about mental health – balance of the worlds and everyday life. In the 17th and 18th century, European settlers linked mental illness to demonic possession, and because of this, exorcism (the expulsion or attempted expulsion of an evil spirit from a person or place – dictionary.com) were occasionally performed to remove the presence of demons or devils. (Moran) Biological factors: genetics. Some children may be born with mental disorders. One of the parents, or even both, can have mental illness, causing their children to have a mental disorder as well. Researchers have also suggested that “genes sometimes moderate the impact of environmental ‘pathogens’” (Parens, 4) Researchers show that half of all lifetime cases of mental illness begin by age 14. Scientists are discovering that changes in body leading to mental illness may start much earlier, before any symptoms appear (NIMH). People who suffer from mental disorders have different feelings and emotions than “normal” people, and can lead to syndromes like depression. Depression is a type of mental illness, it can cause changes in sleep patterns, and some effects such as extreme tiredness, loss of energy, and difficulty concentrating or making decisions (WebMD, 1) Short term: can cause anger, sadness, feelings of helplessness if the child does not know what is happening (psychguides). Long term: can drive a person to the point of suicide (Psychguides). There are many types of psychotherapy for children, 1 of the examples is: The play therapy – used to treat disorders such as anxiety and depression for children between the age of 3 to 12. This involves a form of communication of which uses toys as words, and children engage in “storytelling followed by identifying the feelings of characters in the story; role-playing with puppets as a form of feeling projection; and blowing bubbles to improve deep and controlled breathing” Another example is the art therapy: It is used to treat disorders such as anxiety, depression, and family/relationship struggles. “Children draws a story of their life events. Therapists then analyze the drawings for themes and feelings that they discuss with the child” Treatment for mental illness can be really costy: In 2003, Canada’s indirect costs associated with mental health was $34 billion (obviously increased a lot more after so many years) United State’s indirect costs associated with mental disorders was about $79 billion (also increased a lot more after the years) Children and adults who have mental disorders should be treated as soon as possible, because if the disorder gets serious and after a long time, it can cause suicides and/or be dangerous to their surroundings. Even the short term effects, such as depression or causing different emotions or feelings to occur, can be dangerous or make them unsociable to other children, therefore making their situation worse. Personal Reflection and Opinion Causes Environmental factors: such as stress or parenting style. Mental illness may be developed by their surroundings. For example, if they are treated differently or discriminated, whether at school or at home, they may start to think and feel differently and develop a mental disorder (Parens, 4). History History Cont'd By: Jimmy Zhang Solutions Mental Illness and Treatment for Children Mental illness and mental disorders can be a serious problem for the people who have it and their families or friends. Mental illness can start out as a simple, easy to treat disorder, but it may develop worse and worse if their surroundings are bad for them,

Mental Illness Presentation

Transcript: What is the narrator's illness in Edgar Allen Poe's "The Tell Tale Heart"? My Hypothesis My Hypothesis My hypothesis of the narrator's disease in Edgar Allen Poe's "The Tell Tale Heart" is a combination of Phobia and Schizophrenia. Phobia Phobia Phobia is one type of some anxiety disorders, and is a very powerful aversion of an object, creature, or thing that presents little or no real threat ("Specific Phobias"). The narrator shows signs of phobia of the old man's "Vulture Eye." The narrator spends hours watching the old man at night stealthily using his lantern to shine only on the eye. After murdering the old man, he is happy that he will never see the evil eye again. Symptoms Most patients don't have the same phobia as others and not in the same amounts. Patients usually try to aviod their phobia, but if they can't get away from their phobia these symptoms occur: Trembling Shortness Of Breath A Strong Desire To Get Away Rapid Heartbeat Fear And/Or Panic ("Phobias") Symptoms Background Information Backround Information Phobias can be very specific, like the narrator's phobia of the old man's "Vulture Eye;" then there are more general phobias like spiders. (Ribeiro) Treatments Most patients can be cured of their phobia. These treatments include: Medicine Therapy Both ("Phobias") Treatments Extra Information Experiencing phobias may limit work efficiency, disrupt a relationship, disgruntle everyday life, and/or reduce self esteem. Some phobias begin in childhood and subside after a period of time. Some terrors in phobia may not make any sense, but patients feel helpless against it. ("Specific Phobias") Extra Information Schizophrenia Schizophrenia Schizophrenia is one of several critical brain illnesses. Some patients who have this illness may hear things that aren't there like voices. Patients may also experience a fear that others are trying to harm them ("Schizophrenia" MedlinePlus). The narrator admits to having an illness, and I believe that he is referring to schizophrenia. The main symptom is the narrator's hallucination of hearing the old man's heartbeat grow after the old man is dead. He even thinks the policemen can hear the heartbeat and are just messing with him by not speaking about it. This is paranoia and a delusion. Also, the narrator spends hours and hours just watching the old man and planning the murder. The narrator has no sense of real time or real life and uses violence to solve his problem. Symptoms Symptoms Symptoms of schizophrenia may vary per patient but they include: Hallucinations Movement Disorders Lack In Expressions Anosognosia ("Lack Of Insight") Violent Actions Thought Disorders Reduced happiness in daily pleasers Delusions Muddled Speech ("Schizophrenia" NAMI) (sawerhaq) Background Information Backround Information No one know for sure what causes schizophrenia, but researchers and scientists have associated schizophrenia to many feasible causes like the features of brain chemistry and construction, and environmental causes. Sadly, there is no singular, easy treatment has been found for this illness. But there are treament that over time help keep schizophrenia. ("Schizoprhrenia" NIMH) Treatments Treatments Though there is no cure for schizophrenia, there are possible treatments that will stabilize when the symptoms. Such as: Therapy Phycosocial Rehabilition Medication Synthesis Of All ("Schizophrenia" NAMI) Extra Information Schizophrenia can occasionally run in families. Researchers and scientists have confidence that several varying genes may expand the risk of schizophrenia. Scientsts also think that a lack of harmony in the brain may cause chemical reactions, creating schizophrenia. ("Schizophrenia" NIMH) Extra Information Conclusion Conclusion After researching various types of mental illnesses, I feel that my hypothesis is correct. The narrator shows both a phobia and Schizophrenia as he becomes obsessed with the old man's eye, uses violence to destroy the old man, and hallucinates the sound of the old man's heart beat. (Gonzales) Works Cited Works Cited Ribeiro, S. “Block 1...Tell-Tale Heart Summary.” Mr. Ribeiro's 8th Grade Language Arts Page, Weebly, 18 Oct. 2016, sribeiro8thgradelanguageartspage.weebly.com/reading-block-1/block-1tell-tale-heart-summary. sawerhaq. “The Tell-Tale Heart.” Www.glogster.com, Glogster, 2015, edu.glogster.com/glog/the-tell-tale-heart/28v8o2p8n9e?=glogpedia-source. Images Gonzales, George. “The Tell-Tale Heart - Edgar Allan Poe Book Design.” George Gonzalez, Adobe Publisher, 0AD, georgeg.myportfolio.com/the-tell-tale-heart-edgar-allan-poe-book-design. Information “Schizophrenia.” MedlinePlus, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 30 Apr. 2018, medlineplus.gov/schizophrenia.html. “Schizophrenia.” NAMI Southern Arizona, NAMIsa.org, Sept. 2016, www.namisa.org/uploads/5/0/7/8/5078292/schizophrenia_2016.pdf. “Phobias.” MedlinePlus, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 6 June 2018, medlineplus.gov/phobias.html. “Schizophrenia.” National Institute

Mental Illness Presentation

Transcript: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: OCD is a condition that torments the sufferer with unwanted thoughts ( obsessions) Symptoms: Person with OCD develops an obsession- Obsessions are excessive, unwanted, persistent thoughts or feelings that cause the person distress or anxiety. And may have compulsions-compulsions are the acts or rituals that people are driven to follow in order to try and relieve the obsessive thoughts Specific facts: approx. 1 in 40 adults suffers from OCD 1 in 200 children suffers from OCD there are 5 million people with OCD in the US OCD affects men and women equally The earliest signs of OCD have shown in preschool aged children Boys tend to develop OCD at an earlier age than girls (6-15 for boys 20-29 for girls) Doubters and sinners are afraid that if everything isn’t perfect or done just right something terrible will happen or they will be punished Checkers repeatedly check things (oven turned off, door locked, etc.) that they associate with harm or danger. Counters and arrangers are obsessed with order and symmetry. They may have superstitions about certain numbers, colors, or arrangements. Hoarders fear that something bad will happen if they throw anything away. They compulsively hoard things that they don’t need or use. Washers are afraid of contamination. They usually have cleaning or hand-washing compulsions. Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) the patient is presented with his or her fear and the treatment helps the patient to resist their compulsion cognitive therapy combination with exposure and response prevention. Patients create a hierarchy of situations that cause distress and when they participate in exposure tasks, they are asked to pay particular attention to thoughts and feelings related to these situations resources http://www.camh.net/About_Addiction_Mental_Health/Mental_Health_Information/OCD/ocd_treatments.html#CBT http://www.anxietypanic.com/ocdfacts.html http://www.ocd-world.org.uk/ http://www.camh.net/About_Addiction_Mental_Health/Mental_Health_Information/OCD/index.html

Mental Illness Presentation

Transcript: Panic Disorder Annaliese Goldwasser Also known as: panic attacks Panic Disorder Three types of Attacks: cued (out of the blue) uncued (exposure to situations) situationally predisposed (delayed after being in a situation) Was originally thought to have been part of depression The word "panic" comes from Greek mythology from the God "Pan" History Causes Not 100% sure what exactly causes them- varies per person Could be related to depression, alcohol abuse, smoking, and seasonal affective disorder indirectly caused by traumatic events (illness or accident, death of a family member) Medications (antidepressants) Symptoms Panic VS Anxiety Attacks Females are almost twice as at risk as males People in the age range of 18-25 are most at risk Who is most affected/at risk? Must be diagnosed by a doctor Reoccurring unexpected attacks Persistent fear of having another attack Diagnosis/Prognosis Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) - teaches how to control thoughts and actions in order to deal with attacks. Medications to help balance brain chemicals Maintaining a schedule, getting good sleep, exercise, and avoiding caffeine Treatment/Therapy Having a panic attack doesn't mean you have panic disorder 5% of the population will experience a panic attack while only 1-2% will actually suffer from the disorder Can come seasonally, similarly to seasonal affective disorder Other Information https://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/mental-health-panic-disorder#1 Video Video https://www.verywellmind.com/anxiety-attacks-versus-panic-attacks-2584396 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19698673 https://serenebeginnings.com/common-types-of-panic-disorders/ https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-12538-1_1 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092493389880014X https://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/understanding-panic-attack-basics?scrlybrkr=93586f11 https://www.healthline.com/health/panic-disorder https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-a-panic-attack-2584403 https://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/mental-health-panic-disorder#1 Sources

Mental Illness Presentation

Transcript: Girl in Pieces by Kathleen Glasgow Maddie Lesher About the Book About the Book Charlotte (Charlie) Davis is seventeen years old and has a negative relationship with her mother, which is prone to violent outbursts. As a cutter, she looks for comfort out on the streets, risky relationships, and the shards of glass she uses to cut. After an almost raping in a car tunnel, she is taken to hospital for her injuries and, further, put into rehab. Out of rehab, an old friend helps whisk her away from her mother, the drugs, and bad way of living to Tuscon, Arizona. There, she begins to better her life, but other, and equally as dangerous, problems emerge than cutting. Notable Characters Charlotte (Charlie) Davis: Main character, seventeen, a cutter, and she likes to draw Mike: Charlie's friend who gets her to Tuscon, Arizona. Riley: Charlie begins a romantic relationship with him, he is older, a drug addict, alcoholic, and has his own demons to come to terms with. Blue: Charlie's rehab friend and eventual roomate in Tuscon. Ellis: Charlie's best friend who is in a coma from cutting, which Charlie blames herself for since she never condemned Ellis' cutting. Louisa: In rehab, Charile's roomate and best friend. She sets herself on fire to end her life. And succeeds. Notable Characters Charlie's mother doesn't support her, allowing her to move to Tuscon, Arizona for a new start at life. Louisa commits suicide, upon hearing the news Charlie begins to unravel. Charlie enters a toxic relationship with Riley. Their eventual, and messy, breakup cause Charlie to cut again. Charlie cuts worse and the aftermath of her breakup and cuts makes her realize what she's doing is wrong, her decisions thus far have been wrong. She realizes that she really does want to get better. Important Plot Elements Important Plot Elements Effective Depictions Effective Depictons She portrays the long, hard process of getting better. Doesn't rush the process and shows the difficult choices (like giving in to the old cutting habits, taking drugs, etc.). Shows different methods of getting better; rehab, therapy, medication, and even a change of scenery Constantly says that the scars are a part of the person, it's a part of their life, their past, but not necessarily their future Other characters support Charlie instead of shunning her Despite all the hardships, father's suicide, friend's attempts, absusive mom, there is hope at the end and getting better is possible. Blue said, "'This is it. This is me...It's better to get it up front. And you know what makes me super mad? If a guy has scars, it's like some heroic shit show or something. But women? We're just creepy freaks" (Glasgow 321). Blue is saying to own her imperfections and scars. She hurt herself and there's no changing that. The scars will always be a part of who she is and what she becomes, but isn't the defining factor of who she is. Group Therapy rule, "Group is voluntary. If a member doesn't want to speak, she doesn't have to" (Glasgow 37). Therapy is optional, not forced Therapy isn't the only option. There is one-on-one therapy, group therapy, and medication in the rehab center. Examples Examples Ineffective Depictions Ineffective Depictions The mother doesn't give support to Charlie. In reality, I think the parents would actually help their child, not turn them away, however, the mother being like this might be a necessary event to develop the book. In one instant Charlie's boss criticizes her for wearing a short sleave t-shirt, showing her scars. Examples Examples Charlie's mom's last words before Charlie got onto a bus for Arizona, "This is as far as I go, Charlotte....I don't ever want to see you here again" (Glasgow 98 and 101). Her mother doesn't want anything to do with Charile and she can barely pay for rehab because she does drugs and drinks. Teens might think that their parents won't want to deal with them. Jules said, "Jesus, you can't be out here like that" (Glasgow 258). Making Charlie feel that she has to hide her scars instead of accepting them.

Mental Illness Presentation

Transcript: By Anna Krzysiak Mental Illnesses. What are they? What are they? Mental illnesses are defined as "disorders that affect your mood, thinking and behavior. Examples of mental illness include depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, eating disorders and addictive behaviors" (The Mayo Clinic). How many people are affected? How many people are affected? Mental illnesses affect nearly 20% of people in America and nearly 25% of people all around the world. 18.1% Anxiety Disorders 11% Eating Disorders 6.9% Bipolar Disorder Depression 2% 7.4% Attention Deficit Disorders 18.1% Percent of People With Mental Illnesses In the U.S. (According to NAMI) How does this affect ME? How does this affect ME? Mental illnesses can affect anyone, including anyone's friends, family members, neighbors, teachers, or peers. By being educated on mental illnesses, there is also a large chance that the negative stigma that surrounds them. If gone untreated, mental illnesses can lead to feelings of hopelessness, more severe symptoms, and even suicide. The Stigma The Stigma There is commonly a negative stigma that surrounds mental illnesses. This stigma is seen in many forms, such as: the media portraying mental illnesses as dangerous, unpredictable entities lack of awareness of the severity of mental illnesses health insurances neglecting to cover all of the costs of healing and recovering from a mental disorder lack of education on mental illnesses in schoools lack of equality in the workplace Research Process Research Process Why is there a negative stgma around mental illnesses? How does this stigma come up? How do we get rid of this stigma? My research process included Twitter/Instagram polls that I conducted just to see how people in my community view mental illnesses and how that compaqred to national averages. I was surprised to see that an average of nearly 5 people from my community voted that mental illnesses were exuses for attention. However, there are a few potential problems with my field research, including the numbers of followers, appeal of each social media, and the possibility that not everyone was being honest in their answers to my polls. My Argument My Argument My argument is that we need to erase the negative stigma that surrounds mental illnesses. This stigma may cause those with mental illnesses to avoid seeking help in fear of getting judged or looked at differently by everyone else. By erasing this stigma, more and more people can get the help they need and hopefully begin the healing process without anyone viewing them or their process negatively. https://youtu.be/UqnF3UicuQs There is a program called Project Lets Erase The Stigma (LETS), where their mission is to get more people talking about the severity of mental illnesses, how to treat them, and how to get involved in your community and helping those who need it. As stated on their website, they want to disrupt “(educational system, prison-industrial complex, [and] medical-industrial complex) that perpetuate ableism, discriminate against and oppress mentally ill/neurodivergent folks, and directly impact equity, opportunity, and quality of life”; therefore more and more people will be aware of the negative stigma around mental illnesses, and hopefully less and less people with mental disorders will face oppression when searching for a job (Project LETS). Project LETS Project LETS How Do We Erase The Stigma? How Do We Erase The Stigma? To erase this stigma, we can spread awareness of mental illnesses and the importance of mental health by: creating equality in schools and the workplace, which will lead to those with mental illnesses feeling less like anomolies teaching students about how to spot signs of mental illnesses, how to cope with them, how to reach out for help, and that they are not things that deserve to be viewed negatively making sure the media doesn't portray those with mental illnesses as dangerous people, whether it be through television or news reports https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mental-illness/symptoms-causes/syc-20374968 https://www.twitter.com/krazyannaa https://www.instagram.com/annakrzysiak https://www.letserasethestigma.com/what-is-mental-health https://youtu.be/UqnF3UicuQs https://www.nami.org/ Works Cited Works Cited

Mental Illness Presentation

Transcript: Mental Illness Daniel Yurchak, Brianna Coppinger, Samantha Mullaney By Depression and anxiety played a major role on society in the 1950’s and the early 1960’s. In contrast, before the 1970's, depression was usually considered a relatively rare condition involving feelings of intense meaninglessness and worthlessness often accompanied by vegetative and psychotic symptoms and preoccupations with death and dying. The real issue is that culture had little to no conceptions of those with mental illness, which eventually made it worse. Societies Conceptions Played a Major role WHAT Most health professionals devised plans to seek out public education to help with the effort of informing people on mental illness and how it was diagnosed. This had no affect and actually made it worse. The Trends People were more likely to apply a broad range of negative adjectives such as "dangerous," "dirty," "worthless," "bad," "weak," and "ignorant" to a person labeled as "insane" or "neurotic" than to an "average" person. These trends indirectly suggested that the public came to think differently about how mental illness was being defined as a broader array of problems in mental health terms and that there is less stigma attached to these problems and their treatment. IQ The Yellow Wallpaper In this book the author undergoes a harsh treatment and shares her experiences of how she embellished her depression and mental illness. Charlotte Perkins Gilman author Gilman’s character in “The Yellow Wallpaper” was not allowed to do anything that she knew that would help her. “I believe that congenial work, with excitement and changes would do me good….I did write for a while in spite of them”. Most women were treated in such way. If they disobeyed the doctor’s orders then they faced the asylum that no one wanted to deal with. The patients had to follow their doctors prescription perfectly otherwise that would be another stigma. The main character in “The Yellow Wallpaper” was prescribed the rest cure and “prescription for each hour in the day." Most of the woman who wanted to go to work or do something that was the norm for woman was considered selfish. TITLE TITLE The Rest Cure usually lasted six to eight weeks. It involved isolation from friends and family. It also enforced bed rest, and nearly constant feeding on a fatty, milk-based diet. Patients were force-fed if necessary - effectively reduced to the dependency of an infant. Nurses cleaned and fed them, and turned them over in bed. Doctors used massage and Electrotherapy to maintain muscle tone. Patients were sometimes prohibited from talking, reading, and writing. Rest Cure TITLE There were a handful of people who were not stuck onto the cultural norm of not accepting those with mental illnesses just like Gilman. And in her book, The Yellow Wallpaper’s elements of humor and horror, perpetuate the idea that society views mental illness as grotesque. conceptions Using a psychological approach in her literature, Charlotte Perkins Gilman added complexity to the main character in “The Yellow Wallpaper” to show that mental illness is as multifaceted as the individual it afflicts. She used her writing to expose the negative way mental illness was perceived in society and literature’s propaganda that falsely perpetuated these misrepresentations. Gilman used her story to advocate for a better diagnosis of mental illnesses by recognizing that there is more than one cause stemming from biological and societal factors. TITLE In the late 19th century to the 20th century, some doctors believed that diet had something to do with the mental illness. The 19th century was the epitome of the female oppression. The doctors were taking extreme measures on no scientific fact that affected the social views on mental illness. Even though there were more women that were diagnosed with the nervous depression, if a male was diagnosed, the treatment would be the same. What did we do about it? Women were considered physically weaker yet morally superior to men, which meant that they were best suited to the domestic sphere. When woman were diagnosed with the “madness” or “incurable woman”, created a stigma towards woman who showed emotion. Women were held to such a standard during this time period. Woman had to keep up not only their appearance but their families appearance. This enhanced the '"cult of domesticity”. The cult of domesticity was the name of the two different societal spheres in its place. Females sphere was mainly in the home where males were mainly the breadwinners that made all decisions. Each sex, according to Catherine Beecher, was superior within its assigned sphere, and thus a sort of equality was achieved. Beecher believed that “it is in America, alone, that women are raised to an equality with the other sex.” societal views stigma IDEAS Diagnoses And Treatments In relation the disparity between anxiety and depressive diagnoses had narrowed, although anxiety was still far more common than

Mental Illness Presentation

Transcript: An example of a mental illness is... It isnt always bad... Feeling sad Extreme mood changes Extreme change in eating habits Suicidal thoughts Drug or alcohal abuse Trouble focusing Easily adgetated Lennie has a mental disorder. Doesnt remember stuff. Constantly petting and messing with things. Mental Illness Presentation by Desiray, Alexus, Emmanuel, Joseph Citations MLA MORE FACTS: Facts about Mental Illness Facts Celeberty with a Mental Disorders Laws to protect people with mental illness Signs of mental illness "Mental Illness Treatments." Better Health. Better Health Channel. Web. <www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au>. "Mental Illness Causes." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Clinic Staff. Web. <www.mayoclinic.org>. Kivler, Carol. "Responding to Mental Illness in the Work Force." Psychcentral. Psychcentral. Web. <psychcentral.com>. Of mice and men connections A class of disorders that usually affects the way you view the world and your natural ability to comprehend things normally. In 1990 congress passed the americans with disabilitys act that protect people with mental and physical disabilitys. How ever this law has cause controversy with lawsuits about discrimination. Congress also passed the employment law that has left those with mental disabilitys in the cold. Some mental illnesses aren't all that severe. Like ADHD, ADD, and OCD. Mental illnesses in general affect the way your brain chemistry works like ADD just make it so its harder to learn and focus Mental Illness is... Schitzophrenia is... About 20% of the worlds children and adolesents have a mental disorder Substance and mental dissorders contribute to 23% of disabilitys The exact cause of mental illnesses is not known but we know it as something to do with genetics. 1 in 17 americans live with a serious mental illness More than 90% of suicides had a diagnosed mental disorder a brain disorder that affects the way you see reality and emotions. It literally makes you crazy. 1% Of the American population (2.2 million) Symptoms include Trouble focusing Getting things done takes longer Hallucinations Hearing voices etc. Megan fox has a personality disorder. A personality disorder is where you think your somebody else half of the time its very serious, and she also has mild schitzophernia. Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness that can cause you to hear things and see things that arent really there.

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