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Set

Transcript: Face 1. [usually passive] to fix your face into a firm expression (E.g. Her jaw was set in a determined manner.) Put/start 1. to put something/somebody in a particular place or position (E.g. She set a tray down on the table.) 2. to cause somebody/something to be in a particular state; to start something happening (E.g. Her manner immediately set everyone at their ease.) Example/standard 1. to fix something so that others copy it or try to achieve it (E.g. This could set a new fashion.) Play/book/movie 1. [usually passive] to place the action of a play, novel or film/movie in a particular place, time, etc. (E.g. The novel is set in London in the 1960s. Hair 1. to arrange somebody's hair while it is wet so that it dries in a particular style (E.g. She had her hair washed and set.) Words to music 1. set something (to something) to write music to go with words (E.g. Schubert set many poems to music.) Jewellery 1. [usually passive] to put a precious stone into a piece of jewellery (Her bracelet was set with emeralds.) Become firm 1. to become firm or hard (E.g. Leave the concrete to set for a few hours.) Arrange 1. to arrange or fix something; to decide on something (E.g. They just set a date for their wedding.) Clock/machine 1. to prepare or arrange something so that it is ready for use or in position (E.g. She set the camera on automatic.) Bone 1. to put a broken bone into a fixed position and hold it there, so that it will heal; to heal in this way (E.g. The surgeon set her broken arm.) Set Work/task 1. to give somebody a piece of work, a task, etc. (E.g. She set herself a difficult task.) For printing 1. (technical) to use a machine or computer to arrange writing and images on pages in order to prepare a book, newspaper, etc. for printing Table 1. set a/the table to arrange knives, forks, etc. on a table for a meal (E.g. The table was set for six guests.) Of sun/moon 1. to go down below the horizon (E.g. We sat and watched the sun set.)

Template - Poster Set 3

Transcript: Main idea: This provides a brief outline of the investigation. Materials: equipment needed, other resources (books, videos, etc) General Information: This will guide teachers through the process of using the Steps To Inquiry posters. It is the same for all lessons using a particular poster set. Students learn to organize their thinking and design their own inquiry experiments through careful observation of an object, situation, or event. They then conduct their experiments and report their findings in a lab report, poster, tri-fold board, slide, or video that follows the typical format of the scientific community studying the natural world. This prezi outlines the scaffolded approach and a scenario to illustrate its use in the classroom. The subject or topic is used to explain the framework for teachers to guide their students through the inquiry process. It is not designed for any specific grade level, and can be used successfully and appropriately at many levels. Teachers should use their professional judgment to decide what is suitable to the strengths, needs and interests of their students. Step 8: Rationale Student groups then provide an explanation to support their prediction. They can expand on the background discussions and research started in Step 4 by providing more details to support their predictions. As with the prediction statement, the teacher should not judge the content of students‘ rationale. Students need to express their own conceptions and clarify their own thinking before proceeding with their experiments. The teacher actively listens and watches for misconceptions and constructs learning experiences that challenge students to confront these misconceptions. At this point, student groups are almost ready to begin their experiments. Methods The Fishbone Experiment Organizer provides a procedural outline. Teachers should resist the temptation to require students to write out a detailed series of procedural steps at this timeenergy and enthusiasm for the project will wane if written procedures are required at this stage. Safety considerations should again be reinforced before allowing students to proceed. Step 1: Careful observation After the demonstration, students return to their seats to think for a few moments about what they have seen or share observations with a partner or small group. The teacher circulates as students write down their observations, or behavior descriptors, on yellow sticky notes (with one observation per note). This is the first time many of these students have used the Observations Starburst Diagram (Figure 1) so they are reluctant to start. The following scenario describes what happens next: Step 2: Select the dependent variable In scientific research, scientists make careful observations of behaviors and then choose one for further study—the dependent variable (DV). In this activity, the teacher or student selects one of the exhibited behaviors that is of interest to them, which then becomes the dependent variable of the study. This is why the Observations Starburst Diagram is helpful—the act of physically separating one sticky note (i.e., behavior descriptor) and declaring it the dependent variable reinforces the importance of isolating a single behavior. It also demonstrates that selecting a new dependent variable creates a new range and variety of possible studies. A class discussion of how to measure changes in the dependent variable—in terms of instruments, units, and techniques—may be helpful at this point, and ideas will vary depending on students‘ past experiences. This presents another diagnostic opportunity for the teacher to reflect on the vocabulary and phrasing students use for a specific measuring technique or task. The teacher may want to introduce a new device or procedure for students to consider. Since student groups design their own experiments, those interested in learning the new measurement technique can then be explicitly taught those techniques during a subsequent class. The power of this method comes from the fact that the ideas are coming from students. The teacher does not tell them what they have seen—or what they should have seen. It is important that all observations come from the students and are framed in the language they use. This observation period offers an excellent diagnostic opportunity for the teacher to assess students‘ level of scientific understanding through their use or misuse of scientific vocabulary and concepts. It is a time to honor student thinking and listen to their conversations as they debate what they did or did not observe. Through this part of the activity, students are encouraged to develop observation skills without attributing cause or attempting explanation. The sticky notes are particularly helpful for reluctant writers and promote risk-taking because they can easily be added, removed, or relocated to match changes in thinking. Legend: The following symbols appear throughout the prezi. Clicking on an

Template - Poster Set 1

Transcript: This prezi is designed to assist teachers in creating and sharing lessons using the Steps to Inquiry Posters. The "play" button at the bottom of the screen allows teachers to step through the items in sequence. In addition, teachers are able to click on objects at any point in order to zoom in and access the following: •Instructions •Materials •Pictures •Videos •Links •Student examples If additional zooming is required, hover the mouse over the right side of the screen and a zoom tool will appear. The scroll function may also be used for this purpose. The lesson provided here is an example only. It is not meant to be followed step-by-step, but used as a framework for teachers to guide their students through the inquiry process. It is not designed for any specific grade level, and can be used successfully and appropriately at many levels. Teachers should use their professional judgment to decide what is suitable according to the strengths, needs and interests of their students. The learning log is an optional tool for primary students to record their thinking and their results as they work though the investigation. Relevant vocabulary can be added to the “My Science Words” page as they are encountered. Question Matrix Template http://alturl.com/yy7cp STEPS TO INQUIRY Poster Set 1 Cultivating Keen Observers pdf http://alturl.com/9ge47 Teachers begin by showing an object or demonstrating an event. Students are asked to carefully observe the object or event using their senses. Hand lenses and microscopes may be used to extend observations. (Note: Using the sense of taste is not good scientific practice in most circumstances. It may only be done when appropriate and under teacher supervision.) Students record their observations on sticky notes (one observation per sticky). Observations may be in the form of words or pictures. Students may also draw a labeled diagram. Teachers can help deepen observations through prompting questions. One sticky note from step 2a moves to the Measure/Observe spot in Step 3a. One sticky note from Step 2b moves to the Changed Variable spot. All other sticky notes from Step 2b move to the Unchanged Variables spots in Step 3b. Discussion may take place to clarify the concepts of variables and fair testing. Students sort observations according to those that are descriptions and those that relate to the behaviour of the object. Students are then instructed to re-create the object and event so that it behaves in the same way as the teacher’s model. Discussion will occur around the differences in the behaviour of the student examples- why this is happening, are the differences significant, etc. From there, additional observations and questions may be added to the poster. A possible prompting question starter may be “What will happen if…” It is important to note that this process is not linear-– students and teachers may go back and forth between testing , making observations and asking questions. Finally, questions are sorted into categories: those that can be answered through research, those that are testable, and those that are speculative-– difficult to answer but worth thinking about. Sticky notes developed from the "Wonder" section of Step 1 (and determined as testable in the question sort) are moved to Step 2b. (These may also need to be re-worded) Main idea: This provides a brief outline of the investigation. Materials: equipment needed, other resources (books, videos, etc) General Information: This will guide teachers through the process of using the Steps To Inquiry posters. It is the same for all lessons using a particular poster set. Once observations are shared with the class, students use a different colour of sticky note to record questions they may have. Teachers can help to deepen their level of questions through the use of the Q-Chart. This page allows students to explicitly state their question and form a hypothesis. The organizer helps students to learn the importance of keeping the prediction statement separate from their reason. Specific Information: This provides information on the specific activity that is being outlined, including student samples. Links: videos, pdfs, websites Safety Notes The observed behaviours from Step 1 become possible things that could be measured or observed in Step 2a. Sticky notes are moved from the "Observe" section of Step 1 and may need to be re-worded in terms of measurability for Step 2a.

Template - Poster Set 2

Transcript: This prezi is designed to assist teachers in creating and sharing lessons using the Steps to Inquiry Posters. The "play" button at the bottom of the screen allows teachers to step through the items in sequence. In addition, teachers are able to click on objects at any point in order to zoom in and access the following: • Instructions • Materials • Pictures • Videos • Links • Student examples If additional zooming is required, hover the mouse over the right side of the screen and a zoom tool will appear. The scroll function may also be used for this purpose. The lesson provided here is an example only. It is not meant to be followed step-by-step, but used as a framework for teachers to guide their students through the inquiry process. It is not designed for any specific grade level, and can be used successfully and appropriately at many levels. Teachers should use their professional judgment to decide what is suitable according to the strengths, needs and interests of their students. One sticky note from step 2a moves to the dependent variable spot in Step 3a. One sticky note from Step 2b moves to the independent variable spot. All other sticky notes from Step 2b move to control variable spots in Step 3b. Discussion may take place to clarify the concepts of variables and fair testing. STEPS TO INQUIRY Poster Set 2 Specific Information: This provides information on the specific activity that is being outlined, including student samples. Links: videos, pdfs, websites Safety Notes This page allows students to explicitly state their question and form a hypothesis. The organizer helps students to learn the importance of keeping the prediction statement separate from their reason. Main idea: This provides a brief outline of the investigation. Materials: equipment needed, other resources (books, videos, etc) General Information: This will guide teachers through the process of using the Steps To Inquiry posters. It is the same for all lessons using a particular poster set. On this page, students determine what behaviour they are going to test and begin to think of the variables that may affect this behaviour. Sticky notes are moved from page 1 to page 2. The behaviour that will be observed is moved to Step 2, but re-worded in terms of measurability. The testable questions will be re-worded as variables and moved to Step 3. The observed behaviours from Step 1 become possible dependent variables in Step 2a. Sticky notes are moved from the "Observe" section of Step 1 and may need to be re-worded in terms of measurability for Step 2a. Students sort observations according to those that are descriptions and those that relate to the behaviour of the object. Students are then instructed to re-create the object and event so that it behaves in the same way as the teacher’s model. Discussion will occur around the differences in the behaviour of the student examples- why this is happening, are the differences significant, etc. From there, additional observations and questions may be added to the poster. A possible prompting question starter may be “What will happen if…” It is important to note that this process is not linear-– students and teachers may go back and forth between testing , making observations and asking questions. Finally, questions are sorted into categories: those that can be answered through research, those that are testable, and those that are speculative-– difficult to answer but worth thinking about. Double click anywhere & add an idea Legend: The following symbols appear throughout the prezi. Clicking on an object will allow you to zoom in and read the information contained there. Sticky notes developed from the "Wonder" section of Step 1 (and determined as testable in the question sort) are moved to Step 2b. (These may also need to be re-worded) Once observations are shared with the class, students use a different colour of sticky note to record questions they may have. Teachers can help to deepen their level of questions through the use of the Q-Chart. Cultivating Keen Observers pdf http://alturl.com/9ge47 Question Matrix Template http://alturl.com/yy7cp Teachers begin by showing an object or demonstrating an event. Students are asked to carefully observe the object or event using their senses. Hand lenses and microscopes may be used to extend observations. (Note: Using the sense of taste is not good scientific practice in most circumstances. It may only be done when appropriate and under teacher supervision.) Students record their observations on sticky notes (one observation per sticky) and draw a labeled diagram. Teachers can help deepen observations through prompting questions.

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