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PhD Presentation

Transcript: Amir Mostaghim University of Guelph Everybody Must Get Stoned? Introduction Introduction Theorizing Marijuana Using Subcultures Theorizing Marijuana Using Subcultures Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies Unpacking Subcultures Unpacking Subcultures Post-Subcultural Theories (Re)Inserting Gender and Ethnicity in Subcultural Theories Constraint Self Constraint Self Differentiated Normalization Differentiated Normalization Canadian Tobacco Alcohol and Drugs (CTADS): 2013; 2015 Methodology Methodology The Study The Study Interview Analysis Interview Analysis Sensitizing Concepts: Self-Perception Stigma Avoidance Attitude of 'Others' Results Results Self-Perception Self-Perception "I don't know why I used it...I didn't really think about it." (Male,19, Toronto) "want to be different? don't smoke weed then" (Male, 20, Guelph) "what do you mean why I dont use it? It's just an immature thing to do " (Female, 19, Toronto) "It's not really something kids from good families do...I don't know I've never really thought about why I don't use it...it was never an option" (Chinese female, 19, Toronto) "It just never came up...my friends are all good students so we don't really use drugs." (Indian Male, 18, Guelph) "When we came to Canada I had no friends and couldn't really speak English that well, so smoking pot was a way into the Canadian culture...I made a lot of friends that way" (Indian Male, 17, Guelph) "It has brought me closer to my boyfriend...we do things together that he likes to do and enjoy them" (Female, 18, Toronto) "If my boyfriend doesn't do it again I don't think I will ever use it again...it's really not my thing." (Female, 19, Guelph) Gateway into White Male Society Gateway into white male society "I am more assimilated into the Canadian culture than other brown guys who hang on to the ideas from back home." (Indian male, 19, Guelph) "[My brothers] kept saying that "weed is not for girls"...so I smoked to prove them wrong." (Female, 18, Guelph) "I am somewhat of a tomboy you know?...I am not like those giggly girls who can't handel it. I can handel my own..." (Female, 19, Toronto) As a Distinguishing Feature As a distinguishing feature "I think it's more of a cultural thing...in Canada it's like you can try it, but it doesn't really effect you. In Hong Kong, if you have it, they they thin you're going to get addicted...It's like any other drug, like you are a druggy...most people don't look at it as harmless, the way Canadians do." (Chinese male, 20, Toronto) "For guys it's not big deal really, like people don't think you are a druggy...but like for girls they say "oh she does drugs" (Female, 18, Camrose) Hard vs. Soft Drugs Distinction between hard drugs and soft drugs Stigma Managing Stigma "Most girls who do it are kind of slutty" (Female, 18, Toronto) "Only coconuts smoke weed." (Indian Male, 18, Guelph) "Only the [Indian] gangster type smoke weed..." (Male, 18, Toronto) "You almost expect guys to break the rules...as a girl you almost feel like you get judged." (Female, 20, Toronto) "It effects your family...it could be devastating" (Indian female, 19, Guelph) Where to Use Where to Use White Male Students often use in public so long as it "doesn't bother other people" Women and Asian Students are more likely to use in private To avoid "unwanted attention" For "safety" and security More problems finding places where they can "smoke in peace" With Whom to Use With Whom to Use "If you wouldn't get drunk with them, then don't get high with them" (Female, 19, Guelph) "There is a lot of gossip in our community" (Indian Male, 18, Toronto) “with girls it’s really cliquey….guys just don’t care, its whatever.” (Female, 18, Toronto) Use is kept away from school and work Prefer to not use paraphernalia Bongs considered too "masculine" use of paraphernalia is an indication of "being too involved" Manage the effect through Food consumption Controlled intake Managing a schedule How to Use How to Use Attitude of Others Attitude of Others "I don't think it's a big deal...as long as you are getting your stuff done you know..." (Male, 19, Guelph) "If they want to smoke then go for it, who am I to judge?" (Male, 18, Toronto) "It's really not a big issue for me, it's like drinking. If you are being conscious of its effect then it's not a problem" (Female, 19, Guelph) "Women don't know how to be high...they laugh too much and talk too much. they just ruin the session" (Male, 18, Toronto) "Women who smoke weed are just too guyish [laughs] I don't know how to describe it, it is not attractive." (Male, 19, Toronto) "the stereotype Asian kids who get straight A’s don’t really smoke it.” (Female, 19, Guelph) "Pakistani kids who smoke weed usually come from bad families...they don't really respect the culture." (Indian Male, 18, Toronto) Attitudes Towards Female and AsianUsers Attitudes towards Female and Asian Users "I try to stay away from them you know...it's just if someone sees me they might think I am smoking too and "I

PhD Presentation

Transcript: A Novel Approach for Predictive Analytics on Time Series Model Presented by Scholar: Mrs. V. Aishwaryalakshmi Guided by: Mrs. D. Manjula, M.E., Ph.D. References Agenda Introduction Big Data Predictive Analytics Web Analytics Text Analytics Time Series Model Literature Survey Objectives of the Proposed Work Methodology Possible Outcomes Proposed Timelines References Introduction Big Data Big Data are extremely large data sets that may be analysed computationally to reveal patterns, trends, and associations, especially relating to human behaviour and interactions. Big Data Analytics Big data analytics enables organizations to analyze a mix of structured, semi-structured and unstructured data in search of valuable business information and insights. Predictive Analytics Descriptive Predictive Prescriptive Predictive Analytics Predictive analytics is the practice of extracting information from existing data sets in order to determine patterns and predict future outcomes and trends. Why to perform analysis? Why to perform analysis? Data Analysis has become a major domain for every organization to progress and perform better. The flow of the process transforming the raw data, and then modeling the data to derive some useful information LSA (Latent Semantic Analysis), a technique under NLP (Natural Language Processing), is quite frequently used to carry out the analysis Literature Survey Web Analytics story 1 Web analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of web data for purposes of understanding and optimizing web usage. It can be used as a tool for business and market research. Google Analytics story 2 Google Analytics is a freemium web analytics service offered by Google that tracks and reports website traffic. Google Analytics is now the most widely used web analytics service on the Internet story 3 Time Series Model Time series model analysis to see how useful a given asset, security or economic variable changes over time or how it changes compared to other variables over the same time period FRAMEWORK FRAMEWORK Problem Statement Problem statement Choosing the best decision model for studying the predictions. Generating a Key Predicting Indicator(KPI). Combining the KPI with Google analytics. Utilizing the cross-correlation analysis and Granger non-causality mechanism for validation effectively. Objectives & Outcomes Methodology Methods Techniques Used Proposed Web scraping System architecture Analysis & Visualization Comprehensive Analysis of data using Interactive Reports Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) Latent Semantic Analys... Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) Latent Semantic Analysis is a technique in Natural Processing Technique It creates a vector representation of a document using a mathematical method called Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). Using this a vector representation of a document gives you a way to compare documents for their similarity by calculating the distancebetween the vectors. The following are the steps involved: 1. Stop Words 2. Lemmatization 3. Term Document Matrix (TDM) 4. Term Frequency- Inverse Document Frequency(TF-IDF) 5. Singular Value Decomposition(SVD) 1. Summarize blocks of text using Summarizer to extract the mo... 1. Summarize blocks of text using Summarizer to extract the most important and central ideas while ignoring irrelevant information. 2. Create a chat bot using ParseyMcParseface, a language parsing deep learning model made by Google that uses Point-of-Speech tagging. 3. Automatically generate keyword tags from content using AutoTag, which leverages LDA, a technique that discovers topics contained within a body of text. 4. Identify the type of entity extracted, such as it being a person, place, or organization using Named Entity Recognition. 5.Use Sentiment Analysis to identify the sentiment of a string of text, from very negative to neutral to very positive. 6. Reduce words to their root, or stem, using Porter Stemmer, or break up text into tokens using Tokenize. Removal of Stop words Lemmatization Removal of Stop words Lemmatization Term Frequency-Inverse Docume... TFIDF (Term Frequency – Inverse Document Frequency). Under this method, the count in each cell is replaced by the following formula. TFIDFi,j = ( Ni,j / N*,j ) * log( D / Di ) where > Ni,j = the number of times word i appears in document j (the original cell count) > N*,j = the number of total words in document j (just add the counts in column j) >D = the number of documents (the number of columns). >Di = the number of documents in which word i appears (the number of non-zero columns in row i). The words that concentrate in certain documents are emphasized (by the Ni,j / N*,j ratio) and words that only appear in a few documents are also emphasized (by the log( D / Di ) term). Term Frequency-Inverse Document Frequency TF - IDF Matrix TF - IDF Matrix SVD -> Anxp= Unxn Snxp VT pxp The U matrix gives us the coordinates of each word on our “concept” space, The Vt matrix gives us the [1]

PhD Interview Presentation Template

Transcript: Why I Have Applied for a PhD Program Project 2 Overview Diving into [Project Name], I delved into [brief description of the research questions]. The methods utilized, such as [mention specific methods], led to [highlight significant outcomes]. This project enhanced my expertise in [mention relevant skills or knowledge areas]. Mostafa Gharbawi Dissertation project: Synchronisation of Heterogeneous Oscillators in Power Networks Introduction: Unveiling My Academic Journey With a background in [mention field], I am deeply passionate about [add specific research interests]. Through my academic journey, I have honed my skills in [mention relevant skills] and aim to make impactful contributions to the field of [mention field]. A Stable Power Network: Aim: Online integration of renewables into the grid, Eliminating environmental impacts. Challenges: Operational and inertial dissimilarity, system instability, Asynchronisation and frequency disturbance, Uncertainty in availability of natural resources. Prepared for the Next Chapter Personal Background: Studied Engineering Mathematics, Skillful in data modeling, Worked on numerous group projects, Helped my employer to increase revenue, Highly receptive, enthusiastic, and discipline. Envisioned Power Network: Project 1 Overview Solutions: Conventional power network model, Kuramoto model. Results: Synchronisation and stability equivalence, Quantifying network connectivity, Synchronous parametric conditions. Future work: Feasible synchronisation conditions, Locally merging green generators. Involvement in Other Group Projects Automation of Manual Tasks Early Prediction of Sepsis Disease Objective: Service Quality, End-user experience. Tools: Challenges: Data pre-processing, Missing clinical records, Effective approach. Binary Probabilistic Classification: Maximum a Posteriori method, Naive Bayes Theorem. Outcome: Reduced completion time to 20%, Streamlined journal process, Improved invoicing quality. Why Am I the Ideal Candidate for This Project? My educational background, Possess genuine passion for this field, Result-driven and pragmatic in approach, Responsible for my own academic development, Believe in AI as a tool for the betterment of humanity. Assignment Using MAP: Skills Acquired: Data quality assurance, Coding reproducibility, Collaboration & improvement, Interpersonal & communication. Final Results: THANK YOU FOR LISTENING Improved input data Increased success rate from 45-60% Any questions? mostafa.gh1989@gmail.com

PhD presentation

Transcript: The effect of woodland expansion on tick populations and Lyme disease risk Wester Ross, Scottish Highlands Why care? Why care? Early symptoms Early symptoms chronic symptoms chronic symptoms Nervous system Neuroborreliosis Joints Lyme arthritis Skin Acrodermatica chronica athropicans Why now? Why now? possible reasons for increased incidence possible reasons for increased incidence climate change increased forest cover more people outdoors increased awareness where does scotland stand? where does scotland stand? what do we know? what do we know? Lyme disease risk Exposure Hazard lyme disease hazard Environment HOSTS density of infected ticks competent vs incompetent hosts Gilbert L. 2016 James M. 2014 what do we not know? what do we not know? Lyme disease risk 1. How is the density of infected ticks affected by woodland expansion? 2. What is the mechanism for this effect, i.e. How are host communities and their tick infestation and Borrelia burgdorferi infection prevalences affected by woodland expansion? 3. Can deer be considered incompetent hosts? What are the mechanisms behind deer resistence against B. burgdorferi? hazard Hazard exposure exposure 1. How do people's movements affect disease risk? 2. What are people's perceptions on Lyme disease risk? 3. how do their perceptions of risk modify their behavior to mitigate the risk? how to go about finding it out? team Prof Jaboury Ghazoul Dr Lucy Gilbert Dr Marc Metzger ETH Zurich James Hutton Institute University of Edinburgh TEAM! supervisors students Corinne Schlierenzauer Ron Rothbarth Livia May Flavia Mondini ETH Zurich Wageningen University ETH Zurich Basel University where to find it out? where to do it? field site types field site types what to do? what to do? blanket drags blanket drags deer sampling deer sampling mammal and birds sampling bird and small mammal sampling genetic analysis genetic analysis questionnaires and focus groups focus groups 5 months 8 cars 150 field days 40 sites 20 estates 36 early wake-ups 1200 blanket drags 29 deer 77 birds 174 small mammals 6792 ticks so far in the field,,,, So what? first results woodland type understorEy deer few deer few ticks high bird and small mammal diversity and density kinloch estate what now? thank you

PhD Presentation

Transcript: 3% have attempted to take their own life Gay Men & Mental Health Help-Seeking: The Role of Social Media Half of the sample felt that life wasn't worth living Willem Stander Affective nature of help-seeking unacknowledged (McDermott & Roen, 2016) Field requires an appreciation of the ocmplex entanglement of emotions, norms, and subjectivities involved in help-seeking How do hetero/homonormative discourses operate to govern gay men's subjectivities in seeking help online? Formal/Informal Mainstream/Niche Dominated by positivistic, rational choice approaches Offer valuable insights into why some gay men avoid/delay engaging with services Conflicting findings regarding mental health service use by gay men; Specific mental health needs (e.g., coming out, dealing with discrimination & prejudice, & same-sex relationships) that require tailored approaches; Gay men are more likely to report stigma & other negative experiences in primary care (Elliot et al., 2015). To date... Any questions? Tensions... Multi-method qualitative approach MindOut (Mental health service run by and for LGBTQ people) (e.g., online chat, social media accounts) STAGE 1 (SERVICE PROVIDERS): 1. How do mental health charities/services utilise their online ICT and social media to support gay men? Semi-structured interviews Focus group Thematic Analysis STAGE 2 (SERVICE USERS): 2. How do gay men experience their use of online ICT & social media in seeking help? On- and offline interviews Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis 3. How is gay men's mental health help-seeking behaviours constructed in the online sources they utilise? Elicitation methods Foucauldian Discourse Analysis References Multiple & expanding help-seeking options increasingly available online Gay men widely considered as early adopters & heavy users of the Internet & social media (Dowsett et al., 2008; Gudelunas, 2012) Open to receiving mental health-related promotion & intervention online (Hooper et al., 2008) Online interventions have been helpful in improving psychosocial functioning for gay men with relatively few social outlets (Pachankis & Godfried, 2010) Digital dimension a "must" for organisations/charities/services seeking to reach & engage with this population (Mowlabocus et al., 2014) Insufficient attention to understanding gay men's subjective experiences of this process Limited consideration to factors that encourage help-seeking Or how they engage with a diversity of formal and informal support A paucity of research exists at the intersection gay men's digital culture, mental health, & help-seeking behaviours Moving Forward... 22% experience moderate to severe levels of depression Communicative practices shaped by platforms (Jenzen & Karl, 2014) These technologies largely benefit (or are used by) those who enjoy certain privileges (i.e., those who are already well-networked); see Jenzen & Karl (2014) for similar critiques Diverse representations (i.e., those that aren't White, urban, or middle class) often absent 1 in 4 gay men have deliberately hurt themselves 6,861 UK-based Gay & Bisexual Men (Guasp, 2013) Dowsett et al. (2008). 'Taking it like a man': Masculinity and barebacking online. Sexualities, 11 (1/2), 121-141. Elliot et al. (2015). Sexual minorities in England have poorer health care experiences: A national survey. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 30(1), 9-16. Guasp, A. (2013). Gay and Bisexual Men's Health Survey. Retrieved from Stonewall, London. Gudelunas, D. (2012). There's an app for that: The uses and gratifications of online social networks for gay men. Sexuality & Culture, 16, 327-365. Hooper et al. (2008). An online needs assessment of a virtual community: What men who use the Internet to seek sex with men want in Internet-based HIV prevention. AIDS & Behavior, 12(6), 867-875. Jenzen, O., & Karl, I. (2014). Make, share, care: Social media and LGBTQ youth engagement. Ada: Journal of Gender, New media, and Technology, 5. McDermott, E., & Roen, K. (2016). Queer youth suicide and self-harm: Troubled subjects, troubling norms. United Kingdom: Palgrave Macmillan. Mowlabocus et al. (2014). Reaching out online: Digital literacy and the use of social media in health promotion. Working Papers of the Communities & Culture Network, 3. Pachankis, J.E., & Goldfried, M. R. (2010). Expressive writing for gay-related stress: Psychosocial benefits and mechanisms underlying improvement. Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology, 28(1), 98-110. Rickwood, D., & Thomas, K. (2012). Conceptual measurement framework for help-seeking for mental health problems. Psychology Research & Behavior management, 5, 178-183. Help-Seeking (def): "an adaptive coping process that is the attempt to obtain external assistance to deal with a mental health problem" (Rickwood & Thomas, 2012, p. 180) Supervisors: Dr Katherine Johnson Dr Olu Jenzen Dr Kath Browne Gay Men & Mental Health in the Digital Age... Email: W.Stander@brighton.ac.uk Twitter: @willemjstander Gaps remain...

PhD presentation

Transcript: to Child Option B Improve PMTCT uptake Option B+ Treatment preparation Conclusion Treatment response Growth patterns Co-responsibility of caregivers and health care providers Maternal and Child Health Nutritional services Sexual and reproductive Health TB services Non-communicable diseases Mental disorders Need for: development of indicators for integrated approaches integrated medical records & monitoring systems strengthening referral systems Determining psychological and psychosocial treatment readiness for caregiver and child Treatment supporters Family-centered approach Measure pediatric adherence Psychosocial counseling for caregiver and child Treatment literacy 73% had problems in access to care ART 79% vs pre-ART 59%, p=0.01 60% were eligible for ART at study enrollment Cumulative pre-ART mortality was 13.3% Cumulative mortality on ART 14.4% at 24 months Antepartum AZT 300 mg BD Onset of labour sd-NVP During labour AZT / 3TC BD Postpartum AZT / 3TC BD for 7 days Infant daily NVP from birth to 1 wk after weaning Build Institutional and Human capacity Reaching Adolescence & Adulthood Improved virologic suppression Early Infant Diagnosis Infant daily NVP from birth to 6 wks of age Developments in service delivery and care providing both acute and chronic life-long care locally adapted strategies to overcome challenges Integrate Nutritional Support Continued adherence counseling is critical for the success of decentralized care Increase Access Older age and greater disease severity at treatment initiation in sub-Saharan Africa High mortality rate of perinatally infected infants in the first year of life early diagnosis is an urgent priority Antepartum Start HAART for life, regardless of CD4 count Survival Weight and height-for-age significantly improved after ART initiation Underweight 60% -> 25%, Stunted 72% -> 46% Resource availability food, finances, transportation Health literacy Stability at home and daily routine Social support and stigma Cultural and religious beliefs Memory and cognitive function PMTCT (eMTCT) Early identification of exposed child Point-of-care diagnostics Linkage to care Reasons for delay in treatment initiation family delay (34%), provider delay (29%), medical delay (20%), combination (26%) Simplified dosing, including FDC Easy to administer Do not require refrigeration Palatable Suitable for children co-infected with TB Effective second-line treatment for children Detrimental effect of long travel times on virologic suppression Set ambitious yet attainable time-bound targets Linkage to care MCH, pediatric inpatients, nutrition programs, TB services etc. Standarized and simplified regimens and care packages PMTCT Integrating nutritional assessment routine anthropometric assessments use weight-for-age charts Training health care workers Referral for nutritional counseling identifying causes of undernutrition Provision of nutritional supplementation therapeutic and supplementary feeding integrated disease management partnering with organizations Long travel times 26% traveling more than 5 hours Increase level of disclosure Infant daily NVP from birth till 6 wks of age "I have come to the conclusion that HIV/AIDS is not entirely about death. People die and will continue to die for one reason or the other. AIDS is also about the living" (Kiza Ngozi) Disclosure of HIV infection status Adherence Retention in care Shortages of health care providers staging, eligibility assessment, dosing, counseling Lack of (laboratory) capacity for infant diagnosis and treatment monitoring Strengthening Adherence in Macha HIV Service Delivery Optimize Care Zambia HIV prevalence 14% Mother to Child Transmission (MTCT) accounts for 21% of all HIV infections Without interventions the estimated MTCT rates ranges from 15% - 45% PMTCT coverage in Zambia > 75% Political commitment Budget allocation Pregnant Woman Increased access to easy-to-use low-cost point-of-care technologies for Early Infant Diagnosis Factors associated with mortality younger age, anemia, and lower WAZ score Access to HIV screening depends on timely identification of the child being at risk Rural Realities in Paediatric HIV Service Delivery Shortages of equipment and drugs Limited modes of transportation Food insecurity Barriers to Care Revised criteria so that children become eligible for ART at less severe stages of immune suppression Prevention Improve Retention in Care 17% of children > 10 yrs old in 2009 cohort 33% ART vs 6% pre-ART, p=0.05 Integration Decentralized service delivery Follow guidance on disclosure using tools Training of health care providers and counselors to guide the process Intensified information education and communication to destigmatize the disease More widespread testing of children at different entry points - PITC Task-shifting enables decentralization and scale up of ART services Can reduce program costs and increase program efficiency Comply with regulations and policies Consider motivational strategies

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