You're about to create your best presentation ever

Hepatitis C Powerpoint Presentation Templates

Create your presentation by reusing a template from our community or transition your PowerPoint deck into a visually compelling Prezi presentation.

Templates Presentation

Transcript: 1- The user creates a New Space 2- During some time it's modified according to the project needs 3- As the space results useful for a whole company or area the user decides to ask for saving it as Template 4-The Collaborate Team takes care of this process 5- The new process covers the Analysis of the Space that we should save as Template and the Estimation to finish it. 6- Also we should contemplate the current release dates to provide the user the go live Date Save Templates with Content Some Issues are: New Process: 1- URLs that are inherited Some items to take in care to know in which Release the Template will go live: Templates Creation Process Columns Duplicated that couldn't be removed Current Process: Advantages and Disadvantages Features that couldn't be enable Content Type Duplicated that couldn't be removed 1- The user creates a New Space 2- During some time it's modified according to the project needs 3- As the space results useful for a whole company or area the user decides to ask for saving it as Template 4-The Collaborate Team takes care of this process, but during it we usually face some issues Duplicated Content Type This Process will be easier if... - The Site Collections are aligned - The user doesn't modify the Template meanwhile the support team is working on it - If the changes are planed with time Missing Features Issues Estimation: Duplicated Columns Hidden Features 1-The complex of the data inside the Space and its estimation. 2-The issues that we found testing it and the estimation related to them . 3- We will accept simple changes until 7 days before the first INT deploy. 4- Once we passed the limit to request changes the Template will go live in the Next Release. 5- If the user request new Changes after the first INT deploy they will be performed to the next release. .Dotx files required - Old Library Template

Hepatitis C

Transcript: Hepatitis C is a viral disease that leads to swelling (inflammation) of the liver. Causes, incidence, and risk factors Hepatitis C infection is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). People who may be at risk for hepatitis C are those who: Have been on long-term kidney dialysis Have regular contact with blood at work (for instance, as a health care worker) Have unprotected sexual contact with a person who has hepatitis C (this is much less common, but the risk is higher for those who have many sex partners, already have a sexually transmitted disease, or are infected with HIV) Inject street drugs or share a needle with someone who has hepatitis C Received a blood transfusion before July 1992 Received a tattoo or acupuncture with contaminated instruments (the risk is very low with licensed, commercial tattoo facilities) Received blood, blood products, or solid organs from a donor who has hepatitis C Share personal items such as toothbrushes and razors with someone who has hepatitis C (less common) Were born to a hepatitis C-infected mother (this occurs in about 1 out of 20 babies born to mothers with HCV, which is much less common than with hepatitis B) Hepatitis C has an acute and chronic form. Most people who are infected with the virus develop chronic hepatitis C. About 1.5% of the U.S. population is infected with HCV. Symptoms Most people who were recently infected with hepatitis C do not have symptoms. About 10% have jaundice that gets better. Of people who get infected with HCV, most develop chronic HCV infection. Usually there are no symptoms. If the infection has been present for many years, the liver may be permanently scarred, a condition called cirrhosis. In many cases, there may be no symptoms of the disease until cirrhosis has developed. The following symptoms could occur with hepatitis C infection: Abdominal pain (right upper abdomen) Abdominal swelling (due to fluid calledascites) Bleeding from the esophagus or stomach (due to dilated veins in the esophagus or stomach called varices Dark urine Fatigue Fever Itching Jaundice Loss of appetite Nausea Pale or clay-colored stools Vomiting Treatment The goals of HCV treatment are to remove the virus from the blood and reduce the risk of cirrhosis and liver cancer that can result from long-term HCV infection. Many patients with hepatitis C benefit from treatment with medications. The most common medications are a combination of pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin, an antiviral medication. Most patients receive weekly injections of pegylated interferon alfa. Ribavirin is a capsule taken twice daily. Ribavirin can cause birth defects. Women should avoid getting pregnant during, and for 6 months after treatment. Treatment is given for 24 - 48 weeks. These medications have a number of side effects, and patients must be watched closely. Symptoms include: Anemia Depression Fatigue Fever Flu-like symptoms Headache Irritability Loss of appetite Low white blood cell counts and platelets Nausea Thinning of hair Vomiting See: Cirrhosis for information about treating more severe liver damage caused by hepatitis C. Patients who develop cirrhosis or liver cancer may be candidates for a liver transplant. People with hepatitis C should also: Be careful not to take vitamins, nutritional supplements, or new over-the-counter medications without first discussing it with their health care provider. Avoid any substances that are toxic to the liver (hepatotoxic), including alcohol. Even moderate amounts of alcohol speed up the progression of hepatitis C, and alcohol reduces the effectiveness of treatment. Get vaccinated against hepatitis A and B. Hepatitis C

PowerPoint Game Templates

Transcript: Example of a Jeopardy Template By: Laken Feeser and Rachel Chapman When creating without a template... http://www.edtechnetwork.com/powerpoint.html https://www.thebalance.com/free-family-feud-powerpoint-templates-1358184 Example of a Deal or No Deal Template PowerPoint Game Templates There are free templates for games such as jeopardy, wheel of fortune, and cash cab that can be downloaded online. However, some templates may cost more money depending on the complexity of the game. Classroom Games that Make Test Review and Memorization Fun! (n.d.). Retrieved February 17, 2017, from http://people.uncw.edu/ertzbergerj/msgames.htm Fisher, S. (n.d.). Customize a PowerPoint Game for Your Class with These Free Templates. Retrieved February 17, 2017, from https://www.thebalance.com/free-powerpoint-games-for-teachers-1358169 1. Users will begin with a lot of slides all with the same basic graphic design. 2. The, decide and create a series of questions that are to be asked during the game. 3. By hyper linking certain answers to different slides, the game jumps from slide to slide while playing the game. 4. This kind of setup is normally seen as a simple quiz show game. Example of a Wheel of Fortune Template https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Wheel-of-Riches-PowerPoint-Template-Plays-Just-Like-Wheel-of-Fortune-383606 Games can be made in order to make a fun and easy way to learn. Popular game templates include: Family Feud Millionaire Jeopardy and other quiz shows. http://www.free-power-point-templates.com/deal-powerpoint-template/ Quick video on template "Millionaire" PowerPoint Games Some games are easier to make compared to others If users are unsure whether or not downloading certain templates is safe, you can actually make your own game by just simply using PowerPoint. add logo here References Example of a Family Feud Template PowerPoint Games are a great way to introduce new concepts and ideas You can create a fun, competitive atmosphere with the use of different templates You can change and rearrange information to correlate with the topic or idea being discussed. Great with students, workers, family, etc. For example: With games like Jeopardy and Family Feud, players can pick practically any answers. The person who is running the game will have to have all of the answers in order to determine if players are correct or not. However, with a game like Who Wants to be a Millionaire, the players only have a choice between answers, A, B, C, or D. Therefore, when the player decides their answer, the person running the game clicks it, and the game will tell them whether they are right or wrong.

Hepatitis C Presentation

Transcript: Presented By : Odris, Andrea, Gabriella, and Thomas Hepatitis C History History The first type of Hepatitis Virus that was seen was first identified as Hepatitis B in 1963, then Hepatitis A was found in 1973. It wasn't until the 1980's during a study that Hepatitis C was found in the blood previously known as non-A non-B Hepatitis (NANB). Identification of Virus Identification of Virus 1990 - Blood banks began testing blood donors for Hepatitis C. 1991 - FDA approved the first alfa interferon (Schering's Intron A) as treatment for Hepatitis C. 1992 - A blood test was made to effectively scan blood before it was transfused into patients. 1996 - FDA approved alfa interferon (Roche - Roferon A) to treat Hepatitis C. 1997 - FDA approved consensus interferon (Amgen- now InterMune-Infergen) as treatment for Hepatitis C. 1998 - FDA approved Rebetron to treat Hepatitis C. Important Dates Involing Hepatitis C Important Dates Involing Hepatitis C Growth of Hepatitis C (1982-2014) Growth of Hepatitis C (1982-2014) Etiology and Pathology Etiology and Pathology ETIOLOGY ETIOLOGY The “C” Virus is a highly infectious blood-borne virus that affects humans and chimpanzees Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the Hepatitis C Virus. What is Hepatitis C ? WHat is the C Virus? Hepatitis C was first discovered in the 1989 by Michael Hougton. WHEN HEPATITIS C WAS FIRST DISCOVERED? PATHOLOGY There are more viruses related to liver diseases, such as viruses A, B, C. However, the type C Virus is the one that triggers the liver cells to infect the organ causing Hepatitis C and other deadly diseases. PATHOLOGY Progression of an Infected Liver with the Hepatitis C Virus Liver dysfunctions could last from few weeks to a lifetime as a chronic disease or death. Acute and Persistence are two stages in the C Virus infection progress. Acute: When the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) hides, and does not give any alarm to the liver that something is wrong. Chronic or Persistence: It is the form of HCV that causes significant morbidity and mortality of the liver's cells with a risk of liver cirrhosis and subsequently hepatocellular cancer. HEPATITIS C VIRUS STAGES HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION PROCESS HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION PROCESS THE HCV MIGHT NOT WORK ALONE Studies show that the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) might be associated with stress-fibers due to the big amount of them found during a HCV infection. Stress fibers are actomyosin-based bundles, which have several cellular processes including adhesion and motility. These fibers give support cellular structures. This means that the Hepatitis C Virus travels through the cells because stress cells support it. THE HCV MIGHT NOT WORK ALONE The symtoms of the Hepatitis C are unnoticed when it is in its early stage. However, when the infection further develops damages the liver, and many years could pass until the infection becomes chronic. SIGNS AND SYMTOMS SIGNS AND SYMTOMS SYMTOMS OF A CHRONIC HEPATITIS C Bleeding easily Bruising easily Fatigue Poor appetite Yellow discoloration of the skin and eyes (jaundice) Dark-colored urine Itchy skin Fluid buildup in your abdomen (ascites) Swelling in your legs Weight loss Confusion, drowsiness and slurred speech (hepatic encephalopathy) Spider-like blood vessels on your skin (spider angiomas) SYMTOMS OF A CHRONIC HEPATITIS C TO Be Safe... TO Be Safe... The HCV virus only infects humans and chimpanzees, and it is highly contagious through bodily fluids, such as saliva and blood. A periodical blood test is recommended for the detection of Hepatitis C. In the same manner, if the patient is infected with the HCV, an immediate treatment could save his/her life. Response and Treatment Response and Treatment Immune System How the immune system is involved The immune system partially controls the viral infection but due to a long-lasting inflammation that occurs, hepatic damage occurs causing cirrosis. The inefficiency of the immune system in eliminating the virus is not well understood as humoral and cellular immune responses are induced There are still questions to the immune systems responce and the way the virus afflicts the body Treatments Treatments The previous treatment offered outcomes with many side effects, the new drugs that are offered have less side effects with greater outcomes but are costly for patients “Previously the available treatment for HCV comprised peginterferon and ribavirin, whose mode of action was to stimulate the body’s natural immune response to a virus” (Jack, K. 2015) “The new drugs are known as direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) and work by targeting different stages of the viral replication process” (Jack, K. 2015). The new research has brought out some other factors of why treatments are not completed. Women are less likely to complete treatment and have a lower rate of treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV) Research shows that many women are not able to complete treatment due to care taking obligations and have less income or lower paying

Hepatitis C

Transcript: Hepatitis C How Is Hepatitis C Caused? The hepatitis C virus causes hepatitis C. Viruses are germs that can cause sickness. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is spread by direct contact with an infected person's blood. The symptoms of the hepatitis C virus can be very similar to those of the hepatitis A and B viruses. However, infection with HCV can lead to chronic liver disease and is the leading reason for liver transplant in the United States. The hepatitis C virus can be spread by: sharing drug needles getting a tattoo or body piercing with unsterilized tools blood transfusions (especially ones that occurred before 1992; since then the U.S. blood supply has been routinely screened for the disease) transmission from mother to newborn sexual contact (although this is less common) Hepatitis C is also a common threat in kidney dialysis centers. Rarely, people living with an infected person can contract the disease by sharing items that might contain that person's blood, such as razors or toothbrushes. Facts About HCV Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV infection sometimes results in an acute symtomatic illness. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong chronic condition that can lead to cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer. HCV is transmitted through contact with the blood of an infected person. About 130–170 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus, and more than 350 000 people die from hepatitis C-related liver diseases each year. HCV infection is curable using increasingly effective antivirals. Despite ongoing research, there is currently no vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus infection. HCV stands for Hepatitis C virus, or just Hepatitis C. Of every 100 persons infected with HCV, approximately: 75-85 will go on to develop chronic infection 60-70 will go on to develop chronic liver disease 5-20 will go on to develop cirrhosis over a period of 20-30 years 1-5 will die from the consequences of chronic infection (liver cancer or cirrhosis) Hepatitis C CANNOT be passed on by hugging, sneezing, coughing, sharing food or water, sharing cutlery, or casual contact! Many people do not have symptoms when they become infected with hepatitis C. Symptoms may emerge later, taking anywhere between 15 and 150 days to develop. Occasionally a person will not develop any symptoms and their immune system will successfully clear the virus without their knowledge. An infected person without symptoms can still act as a carrier and pass the virus on to others. Symptoms may include: A short, mild, flu-like illness; nausea and vomiting; diarrhea; loss of appetite; weight loss; jaundice (yellow skin and whites of eyes, darker yellow urine and pale feces); itchy skin. About 20% of individuals who become infected with HCV will clear the virus from their body within 6 months, though this does not mean they are immune from future infection with HCV. The other 80% of people will develop chronic hepatitis C infection, during which the virus may cause mild symptoms or no symptoms at all. These people will however carry the hepatitis C virus for the rest of their lives and will remain infectious to others. Questions Q:How can Hepatitis C be prevented? A:Hepatitis C can be prevented by finding out if you have the disease, then being acuratly aware of where your blood is going, whether it be on a tissue, or a diabetes's lancet. Q:After someone has Hepatitis C, what is the medical treatment? A:The medical treatment for Hepatitis C is anti-viral drugs (pegylated interferon and ribavirin). Q:What are the symptoms of Hepatitis C? A:Symptoms may include: A short, mild, flu-like illness; nausea and vomiting; diarrhea; loss of appetite; weight loss; jaundice (yellow skin and whites of eyes, darker yellow urine and pale feces); itchy skin. HCV cell photo frame Hepatitis A,B, and C awareness! Beware non- awareness! Video Sources http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HCV/HCVfaq.htm#section1 http://www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddisease/pubs/hepc_ez/ http://www.kidshealth.org/parent/infections/bacterial_viral/hepatitis.html# http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs164/en/ http://www.health.ny.gov/disease/communicable/hepatitis/hepatitis_c/fact_sheet.htm http://www.avert.org/hepatitis.htm (cc) photo by Franco Folini on Flickr (cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr doodles BAZINGA! Notes BAZINGA!!!! (cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr Assets (cc) photo by jimmyharris on Flickr

Now you can make any subject more engaging and memorable