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Banquo

Transcript: "Lesser than Macbeth, and greater' Not so happy, yet much happier' Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none." The first witches' prediction is common use of the ambiguous language that the witches use, their words ring like a paradox, an equivocation but close analysis of later events proves the truth of the predictions Macbeth becomes king and therefore Banquo becomes his subject - he is "lesser" than Macbeth. Unlike Macbeth who, through his tyranny and ruthless blood-thirst, loses the support and respect of those who were once close to him, Banquo retains his integrity and the respect of all who know him, even though Banquo dies, his memory is that of a noble and loyal gentleman, whereas Macbeth is despised. In this sense, then, Banquo is "greater" than Macbeth. The second witch says that Banquo would be "not so happy, yet much happier". Once again, paradox is used. Banquo would obviously not be happy for the death of his king (Duncan) saddens him later, whilst for Macbeth it brings the crown. Macbeth feels no remorse. Secondly Macbeth has Banquo assassinated, so Banquo is therefore once again, "not so happy". What does make Banquo "much happier" or more fortunate than Macbeth is the fact that in death, he is at peace whilst Macbeth cannot sleep. He becomes steeped in blood and is paranoid, suspecting practically all those around him. He is haunted by the murders of Duncan and Banquo and can therefore not enjoy a peaceful rest. The third witch's prediction "Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none" affirms the fact that although Banquo would not be a king himself, his heirs would. His issue would become either be rulers themselves or would be the progenitors of future kings. Macbeth considers them both threats, but Banquo is compared to the "grown serpent" and the "worm" or immature snake, is Fleance. Macbeth recognizes that even though Fleance has no power right now, he has the capability of power in the near future, and is still a threat. Calling Banquo a serpent can be considered ironic, as serpents are usually considered creatures of evil and chaos, whereas throughout the play, Banquo is held in high regard, "in his royalty of nature/He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valour".(Act 3, Scene 1 51-54) Macbeth asks, "Which of you have done this?" addressing the lords and guests at the feast. Lennox has just tried to show Macbeth to his seat, only Macbeth cannot see that a seat is empty. Instead, he sees the ghosty visage of Banquo. The seat that Banquo occupies, the seat of Macbeth , a supernatural element,foreshadowing ill omens and Macbeth's eventual downfall, because even though Banquo will never be king, that seat will belong to his children. In many ways, Banquo can be seen as the mirror image of Macbeth.Yes,early on they are indeed similar:both are brave warriors;good friends;both are promsied similar things by the witches;both are honored by the king. Where they differ serves to define each man in his own right:where Banquo has a son,Macbeth has a wife; where Banquo is rather indifferent to the witches' prophecies,Macbeth's obsessed. By Act 2, these differences in the two men will lead to Macbeth killing Duncan, and in Act Three the murder of Banquo and attempted murder of his son,Fleance. After Banquo is murdered,he returns as a ghost, a harbinger of bad luck. In the banquet scene, he returns to haunt Macbeth and serves as a supernatural symbol of retribution in the play causing Macbeth to feel guilt and mental illness The Importance of Banquo The Meeting of the Witches The Royal Palace When meeting with the witches, both Banquo and Macbeth receive 3 prophecies where Macbeth receives prophecies of his rise to power , while Banquo receives prophecies of his children rising to power which inadvertently put both Banquo and Fleance in danger. The time has been That, when the brains were out, the man would die, And there an end. But now they rise again... Dreading the Ghost Inversion of Natural Order In Act 3, Scene 4, Macbeth learns of the death of Banquo but and that Fleance has escaped. The news of Fleance’s escape angers Macbeth—if only Fleance had died, he muses, his throne would have been secure. Returning to his guests, Macbeth goes to sit at the head of the royal table but finds Banquo’s ghost sitting in his chair. Horror-struck, Macbeth speaks to the ghost, which is invisible to the rest of the company. Avaunt, and quit my sight! Let the earth hide thee. Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold. The Entrance of The Ghost Banquo There the grown serpent lies; the worm that's fled Hath nature that in time will venom breed, Marrowless/blood is cold-no life, horrific , that which is dead is living

Banquo

Transcript: Banquo's Characterization Evolution BanQuote #1 ”My noble partner/ you greet with present grace and great prediction/ and noble having or royal hope” (1.2, lines 55-57) BanQuote #1 Explanation Banquo calls Macbeth noble, which means someone of high class or political status. And he speaks of his bright futures that are ahead of Macbeth. This shows how Banquos and Macbeths relationship was friendly. Explanation BanQuote #2 ”Your children shall be kings/ You shall be king.” (1.3, lines 87-88) BanQuote #2 Explanation After hearing the witches praise Banquo and tell him that he will be the father of kings, Macbeth also says his children will be king. Banquo responds insisting that Macbeth will be king. The compliments each charater shares with each other further illustrates their friendly relationship. Explanation BanQuote #3 ”Think upon what hath chanced, and at/ more time/ the interim having weighed it, let us speak/ our free hearts each to other” (1.2, lines 158-161) BanQuote #3 Explanation Macbeth wants to confide in Banquo about what the witches said and how they should react. His actions demonstrate their trust and companionship. At this point, Banquo still has loyalty and campanionship with Macbeth Explanation BanQuote #4 ”If you shall cleave to my consent, when ‘tis,/ it shall make honor for you./ So I lose none/ in seeking to augment it, but still keep/ my bosom franchised and allegiance clear./ I shall be counseled.” (2.1, lines 25-29) BanQuote #4 Explanation This quote shows that Banquo will stay loyal as long as Macbeth does not do anything against his morals than he shall stay loyal to Macbeth. Explanation BanQuote #5 ”and i fear/ thou play’dst most foully for ‘t, yet it was said/ it should not stand in thy posterity,/ But that myself should be the root and father./ of many kinds.” (3.1, lines 3-6) BanQuote #5 Explanation At this point in the play, Banquo begins to suspect that Macbeth killed the king. His character shows change in charaterization. This is a turning point for Banquo because he begins to alter his views and actions toward his once trusted campanion. Explanation ”To be thus is nothing, but to be safely thus-/ our fears in banquo stick deep,/ and in his royalty of nature reigns that/ which would be feared. Tis much he dares;” (3.1, lines 48-51) BanQuote #6 BanQuote #6 This is where Banquos relationship with Macbeth completely changes, because now both characters have tensions between each other. Explanation Explanation ”So is he mine, and in such bloody distance/ that every minute of his being thrusts/ against my near’st of life.” (3., lines 116-118) BanQuote #7 BanQuote #7 Baquo knows for certain that Macbeth killed the king. Macbeth is extremely paranoid Banquo will undermine his rule. Banquos death is still to come. Explanation Explanation ”O , treachery, Fly, good fleance, fly, fly, fly!/ Thou mayst revenge. O slave!” (3.3, lines 18-19) BanQuote #8 BanQuote #8 Banquo is finally dead. This was his final development as a charater and because of his character progression throughout the play, he suffered this horrible fate. Explanation Explanation In the beginning Banquos and Macbeths relationship was friendly and extremely loyal to Macbeth. They had an excellent relationship. Banquo even promised to stay loyal to Macbeth as long as nothing went against his morals. However, Banquo's relationship with Macbeth changed him as a character once he realized Macbeth killed the king. The tensions rose between the two and Banquo didn't want to be associated with the murderer. In the end, he went through his final character development: Death. Summary Summary

Banquo

Transcript: Banquo, Loving Father, Royal Soldier and Devoted Friend 4.O treachery! Fly, good Fleance, fly, fly, fly! Thou may ’st revenge —O slave! Who is Banquo? Theme song for Banquo 2. And oftentimes, to win us to our harm, The instruments of darkness tell us truths, Win us with honest trifles, to betray ’s In deepest consequence. "In the Air Tonight" by Phil Collins 1. Good sir, why do you start and seem to fear Things that do sound so fair? I' the name of truth, Are ye fantastical, or that indeed Which outwardly ye show? My noble partner You greet with present grace and great prediction Of noble having and of royal hope, That he seems rapt withal. To me you speak not. If you can look into the seeds of time And say which grain will grow and which will not, Speak, then, to me, who neither beg nor fear Your favors nor your hate. -A foil and opposite of Macbeth. -Seems to be more cautious and aware of the situations he is put in -Doubts and doesn't accept the prophecies of the witches like Macbeth -He is ambitious like Macbeth but he doesn't turn those thoughts into actions. -Represents the path that Macbeth didn't choose to take; letting fate happen by itself. -He is loyal to the king and his friend Macbeth. -His goodness and loyalty causes him his death. Analysis 5. To be thus is nothing, But to be safely thus. Our fears in Banquo Stick deep, and in his royalty of nature Reigns that which would be feared. 'Tis much he dares, And to that dauntless temper of his mind He hath a wisdom that doth guide his valor To act in safety. There is none but he Whose being I do fear, and under him My genius is rebuked, as it is said Mark Antony’s was by Caesar. He chid the sisters When first they put the name of king upon me And bade them speak to him. Then, prophetlike, They hailed him father to a line of kings. Upon my head they placed a fruitless crown And put a barren scepter in my grip, Thence to be wrenched with an unlineal hand, No son of mine succeeding. If ’t be so, For Banquo’s issue have I filed my mind; For them the gracious Duncan have I murdered; Put rancors in the vessel of my peace Only for them; and mine eternal jewel Given to the common enemy of man, To make them kings, the seed of Banquo kings! Rather than so, come fate into the list, And champion me to th' utterance. Banquo: The Social Networker 3. Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all, As the weird women promised, and I fear Thou played’st most foully for ’t. Yet it was said It should not stand in thy posterity, But that myself should be the root and father Of many kings. If there come truth from them— As upon thee, Macbeth, their speeches shine— Why, by the verities on thee made good, May they not be my oracles as well, And set me up in hope? But hush, no more. 5 Important Quotes from Banquo -A general in the king's army and a close friend to Macbeth -Told that his descendents will become kings after Macbeth -Killed by the order of Macbeth -Returns as a ghost to hunt Macbeth and make him go crazy -His ghost also appears with his eight descendents that shall become kings of Scotland

banquo

Transcript: BANQUO : The Scottish General head (kaylan) -explanation: he saying he had a dream of the witches last night, and he was just thinking about that the witches have showed some truth by letting some of macbeth predictions come true. eyes (kaylan) -explanation: banquo saying that if macbeth predictions came truth, and if his come true like the witches say, then the witches are true. EARS (DALINCIA) "Awake, awake! Ring the alarum-bell! Murder and treason! Banquo and Donalbain! Malcolm! awake!" Shake off this downy sleep, death's counterfeit, And look on death itself! " (act II , lines 73-75 , scene III) EPLAINATION : (macduff wakeing banqo and the king's sons, telling them to shake off the sleep, also promulgating that the king has been murdered ) `dgm "TONIGHT WE HOLD A SOLEMN SUPPER , SIR, AND ILL REQUEST YOUR PRESSENCE (act III , lines 14-15 , scene I) explaination : (macbeth inviting banquo to supper) `dgm MOUTH (DALINCIA) "thou hast it now : king , cawdor , glamis , all , as the weird women promised and i fear thou play'st foully for't . {act III , line 20 , scene 1} EXPLANATION (BANQUO NOTICES THAT MACBETH HAS BEEN NAMED GLAMIS , CAWDOR , AND KING ALL IN WHICH THE WITCHES PROMISED AND HE'S STARTING TO GET SUSPICIOUS OF MACBETH AND BANQUOS BEGINNIGN TO THINK MACBETH PLAY FOULLY FOR HIS REWARDS) `dgm "what , can devil speak true ?" {act I , line 108 , scene II} EXPLANATION : (banquo's reaction when it turns out that macbeth has been named than of cawdor , as the withches predidcted) `dgm why, by the verities on thee made good, may they not be my oracles as well and set me up in hope? (clark) (dj) "Command upon me,to the which my duties Are with a most in dissouluble tie For ever knit (dj) ~ He was a strict person that cared about his country Torso (clark) He fears macbeth will find to much power by being king. (clark) Ay, my good lord: out time does call upon's. Heart (dj) -explanation: banquo says that demonic forces often win our confidence by making predictions that come true. -but that myself should be the root and father of many kings. if there come truth from them, as upon thee, macbeth, their speeches shine. {act 3, scene 1, line 5-7} the king taught him how to be a good person therefor he will follow it. (clark) You shall be king. (clark) (dj) Too cruel any where. Dear Duff, I prithee, contradict thyself, And say it is not so. -in the great hand of god i stand, and thence against the undivulged pretense i fight of treasonous malice. {act 2, scene 3, line 126-128} -all's well. i dreamed last night of the three weird sisters: to you they have showed some truth. {act 2, scene 3, line 19-21} -explanation: banquo is placing hisself in god's hands, he will fight against the undissolved purpose of this treason. there if i grow, the harvest is your own (clark) Hands (clark) ~This shows what kind of person Banquo was. He was a thoughtful person that cared. -but 'tis strange: and oftentimes, to win us to our harm, the instruments of darkness tell us truths win us with honest trifles, to betray's in deepest consequence. {act 1, scene 3, line 124-127}

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