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Pollution in the Great Lakes

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Matthew Stephen

on 8 May 2013

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Transcript of Pollution in the Great Lakes

History Effects of the pollution Causes Pollution in the Great Lakes What is being done Where do we go from here History "Water pollution is defined as a change in the chemical, physical and biological health of a waterway due to human activity." ("Introduction: The Great Lakes").

"The Great Lakes are the largest system of fresh, surface of fresh, surface water on Earth, containing roughly 18 percent of the world supply." ("Introduction: The Great Lakes").

"Since the Lakes have large surface area's it makes them vulnerable to atmosphere pollutants that fall with rain or snow and as dust on the lake surface." ("New Concerns About Plastic Pollution in Great Lakes 'Garbage Patch'"). 1. Point Source Pollution: "When pollutants enter the waterway through a specific point, such as a drainpipe draining directly into a river. Examples of point source include human waste and toxic metals." ("Water Pollution in the Great Lakes").

"Industrialization in the region causes many of the point source pollution because of their carelessness where they dump their wastes." ("Introduction: The Great Lakes").

"On the bright-side point source pollution is the easiest to trace back to the company that did it. That is why nearly 100 % of industrial plants use control measures." ("The Great Lakes Today: Concerns"). 2. Non-Point Source Pollution (NPS): “In contrast to point source pollution, non-point source pollution comes from many different diffuse sources and is extremely difficult to regulate and control; therefore, many experts believe that NPS pollution is the top hazard facing the Great Lakes today.” (“Water Pollution in the Great Lakes”).

“NPS pollution is mainly cause by runoff, when rain and snow melt move over the land, picking up pollutants along the way and eventually dumping the pollutants into rivers and lakes. Some common NPS pollutants include fertilizers and pesticides from agricultural lands and homeowners. Oil, grease, and salt from highways; sediment from construction sites and eroding shorelines; and animal and human waste.” (“Water Pollution in the Great Lakes”).

“Ground water movement is an example of NPS pollution. This can happen when water slowly passes through the ground it can pick up dissolved materials that have been buried into the ground.” (“The Great Lakes Today: Concerns”). 3. Atmospheric Pollution: “Atmospheric pollution (or air deposition) is another form of non-point source pollution, though instead of polluting via runoff, the pollution falls from the sky.” (“Water Pollution in the Great Lakes”).

“Acid rain is the most well-known form of atmospheric pollution.” (“Introduction: The Great Lakes”).

“The reason why atmospheric pollution is also a big contributor to pollution is because nutrients and toxic contaminants can be carried long distances from their sources to be deposited in the lakes in wet and dry forms.” (“The Great Lakes Today: Concerns”). 1. Aquatic diseases and deformities: “Heavy metals such as mercury and lead, and human made organic chemicals such as pesticides, increase as they move up the food chain, resulting in tumors and death for predatory animals, such as lake trout, herring gulls, and even humans.” (“Water Pollution in the Great Lakes”).

“Toxic pollutants can alter the genetic makeup of an organism, resulting in either death or extreme deformities.” (“Water Pollution in the Great Lakes.”). 2. Human health issues: “Persistent organic pollutants, or POPs, such as dioxin, PCBs and DDT, are chemical substances that persist in the environment and bio accumulates through the food web; therefore, POPs can also cause sickness and diseases in humans, who are at the end of the food chain.” (“The Great Lakes Today: Concerns”).

“Scientists are still studying the effects of high chemical levels in humans; studies have suggested that toxic chemicals can lead to reproductive problems, cancer and neurological disorders.” (“The Great Lakes Today: Concerns”). 3. Eutrophication: “The amount of plant growth increases rapidly in the same way that applying lawn fertilizers (nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) results in rapid, green growth.” (“Water Pollution in the Great Lakes”).

“Under eutrophic conditions, nutrient loading (more nutrients than the water body can handle) stimulates, excessive plant growth, which in turn decreases the amount of oxygen in the water and eventually kills off certain species of animal life.” (“The Great Lakes Today: Concerns”).

“Other pollution- tolerant species, such as worms and carp, grow rapidly; thus, the ecological balance of the lake is significantly altered.” (“The Great Lakes Today: Concerns”). What is being done about the problem? 1. Clean Water Act of 1972 and 1977 (“New Directions for the Great Lakes Community”).

2. National Environmental Protection Act (1969) (“New Directions for the Great Lakes Community”).

3. Great Lakes Toxic Substances Control Agreement (1986) (“The Great Lakes Today: Concerns”).

4. “Many people are helping to clean up and restore their watersheds, local shorelines, parks and green space. This is what the region needs to stay clean; the help of the people is the only way.” (“Water Pollution in the Great Lakes”). Where do we go from here: “In addition to pollution problems, better understanding of the living resources and habitats of the Great Lakes basin is needed to support protection and rehabilitation of the biodiversity of the ecosystem and to strength management of natural resources.” (“The Great Lakes Today: Concerns”).

“We all need to become aware of how much plastic we use in our lives and avoid using single-use products. Don’t buy water in plastic bottles or cosmetic products with micro beads. Bring re-usable bags to the store with you. Simple things make a big difference, but it’s also important to keep talking about this issue and raising awareness about how it affects the Great Lakes and the world’s oceans.” (“New Concerns About Plastic Pollution in Great Lakes ‘Garbage Patch’”). (Olsson) (Mollerus) (Hawk) ("chart402.gif") (Pensez-y.) ("chart403.gif") (fishtumor_lg.jpg) (photo404.gif) (water,water...Anywhere?) Works Cited "chart402.gif". Chart. epa.gov. Environmental Protection Agency, 2012. Web. 1 May 2013.

"chart403.gif". Chart. epa.gov. Environmental Protection Agency, 2012. Web. 1 May 2013.

fishtumor_lg.jpg. 28 April 2013. teach.GLIN.net. Web. 28 April 2013.

Hawk, Thomas. Warning This Water is Polluted. 21 November 2007. flickr.com. Web. 29 April 2013.

“Introduction: The Great Lakes”. epa.gov. Environmental Protection Agency, 2012. Web. 18 April 2013.

Mollerus, Sharon. Sunrise Little Trout Bay 4. 3 September 2007. flickr.com. Web. 30 April 2013.

Olsson, John Andreas. Plague. 21 November 2009. flickr.com. Web. 29 April 2013.

Pensez-y. 12 April 2008. flickr.com. Web. 29 April 2013.

photo404.gif. 28 April 2013. epa.gov. Web. 28 April 2013.

“New Concerns About Plastic Pollution in Great Lakes ‘Garbage Patch’”. newswatch.nationalgeographic.com. National Geographic, 2012. Web. 18 April 2013.

“New Directions for the Great Lakes Community”. epa.gov. Environmental Protection Agency, 2012. Web. 18 April 2013.

“The Great Lakes Today: Concerns”. epa.gov. Environmental Protection Agency, 2012. Web. 18 April 2013.

“Water Pollution in the Great Lakes”. teach.GLIN.net. Great Lakes Commission, 2002. Web. 16 April 2013.

water, water…Anywhere?. 25 May 2008. flickr.com. Web. 29 April 2013.
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