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Motif Presentation Hamlet- Nature

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Jessica briceno

on 2 October 2012

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Transcript of Motif Presentation Hamlet- Nature

The Tradegy of Hamlet,
The Prince of Denmark By Felix R. & Jessica B
Oct. 2, 12
IB English 2 Act 1 Act 2 Act 4 “There with fantastic garlands did she come
Of crow flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples,
That liberal shepherds give a grosser name,
But our cold maids do “dead men’s fingers” call them.
There, on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clambering to hang, an envious sliver broke,
When down her weedy trophies and herself
Fell in the weeping brook”
(4.7. 164-171) Gertrude to Laertes "Takes off the rose
From the fair forehead of an innocent love
And sets a blister there"
(3.4.42-44) Hamlet to Gertrude “Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit, And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes, I will be brief.” — Polonius speaks to Gertruds and King Claudius , 2.2.92 "Yet here she is allow'd her virgin crants,
Her maiden strewments and the bringing home
Of bell and burial"
(5.1.232-234) “Tis an unweeded garden
That grows to seed. Things rank and gross in nature
Possess it merely”
(1.2.135-137)
Hamlet's first soliloquy In Hamlet, Shakespeare uses the motif of nature to help develop the characters struggle with growing corruption as the play unfolds. Act 3 Act 5 shows the contrast between his controlled and superficial dialogue with other character
reveals his inner thoughts to the audience
express his anger and disgust towards the current events that are happening in his life
Hamlet explains that without exception, everything in his world seems useless to him and not worth living for
metaphor to refers to the world has an “unweeded garden”, a place which is corrupted with unwanted plants = still growing bigger “that grows to seed”,
creates a strong image of Hamlets interpretation of the world and the corruption he lives in
The motif of nature, seen through the diction chose by Shakespeare such as “unweeded garden” and , “gross in nature”; creates a strong image of a place that is infested with unwanted things.
This directly depicts Hamlets feelings towards Gertrude decisions. “Tis an unweeded garden
That grows to seed. Things rank and gross in nature
Possess it merely”
(1.2.135-137)
Hamlet's first soliloquy Polonius beliefs he has figured out the reasons as to why Hamlet has gone mad
tell the King and Gertrude about his finding = being direct and to the point is “the soul of wit”
The fact that Polonius is carrying news which he believes is true but has not facts of, is what eventually makes the play end in a tragic manner (apperance vs. reality)
The motif of nature is exposed when Polonius says that “tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes” which refers to the way in which trees grows and how the fact that it is uncontrollable the shape that it will have is tedious
This metaphor used to relate to being concise = ironic the fact that when he speaks he is the very opposite as to being a conscious person
The theme of growing corruption is highlighted in this quote because of the news which Polonius bears he is corrupting the love of Hamlet towards Ophelia and making it look as it was pure lust and no love.
“Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit, And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes, I will be brief.” — Polonius speaks to Gertruds and King Claudius , 2.2.92 Hamlet talks about how he took the rose from Ophelia’s head, and how he ended up “blistering” the fair forehead of their innocent love.
The rose symbolizes the purity that Ophelia was once known for, while the blister symbolizes the pain and scar that could be left with time.
This quote enhances the theme of corruption by showing how because of his ability to get whatever he wanted, in this case Ophelia this has led to her purity being taken from her.
Not only has he left her without her purity but also she has been left scarred and to a certain extent mad because of how she loved Hamlet. "Takes off the rose
From the fair forehead of an innocent love
And sets a blister there"
(3.4.42-44) Hamlet to Gertrude Very specific flowers and diction in this quote which symbolize a variety of things
daisies symbolize the innocence of Ophelia before dying and long purples which refers to orchids, symbolized her virginity and sexual tension towards Hamlet
shows the happiness of Ophelia within her madness, she was picking flowers which relates to love, but at the same time to death, and she was making garlands for herself
connotations of the words change, “coronet weeds” which could symbolize her yearn for becoming the queen with Hamlet.
When it says “envious sliver broke” it shows that the arm of the tree broke and she fell.
Imagery and personification “weeping brook”, and it develops the theme of corruption in the sense that the corruption which was going around Ophelia led her to suicide
In this point we can see the culmination of a lot of corruption put together
The truth is that Polonius actions of decieve and lies and trying to corrupt Claudius and Gertrude mind with exposing them to the true Hamlet, is what led to his own death and of his daughter “There with fantastic garlands did she come
Of crow flowers, nettles, daisies, and long purples,
That liberal shepherds give a grosser name,
But our cold maids do “dead men’s fingers” call them.
There, on the pendent boughs her coronet weeds
Clambering to hang, an envious sliver broke,
When down her weedy trophies and herself
Fell in the weeping brook”
(4.7. 164-171) Gertrude to Laertes The priest complains of Ophelia's funeral, "Her virgin crants" is a bouquet of flowers, and "strewments" are flowers to be scattered over her grave
If the priest had had his way, rocks would have been thrown on Ophelia's grave, because he thinks she committed suicide
But Laertes tells the "churlish priest" that she will have flowers even after her death
enhances the theme of corruption because of the fact that the priest requests that Ophelia’s grave be covered in rocks, instead of flowers because he assumes that she committed suicide
This quote again characterizes Laertes as a loyal and caring brother
What the flowers on the symbolize to Laertes is the purity that he once saw in Ophelia, and he would rather remember her as being pure as opposed to remembering her with rocks on her grave. "Yet here she is allow'd her virgin crants,
Her maiden strewments and the bringing home
Of bell and burial"
(5.1.232-234)
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