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Year 9 - The Roaring Twenties

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Michael Brodie

on 14 May 2014

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Transcript of Year 9 - The Roaring Twenties

Step One
- Draw a cocktail glass and write down all the prohibition ingredients (facts and themes) which helped bring about prohibition. E.g. Legacy from World War One, Anti-Saloon League.

Step Two
– Give measurements to your list of ingredients. The largest measurement must go to the reason you think is most important and the smallest to the least
important.

Measurements – E.g. one shot of, a dash of, a twist of, a hint of, a squeeze of etc.

Step Three
– Give your cocktail a name which reflects your judgement of the most
important. e.g. Flaming Fundamentalist

Extension – All cocktails need to be mixed in the correct order to get the taste
just right, so arrange which order (chronology) the ingredients contributed to prohibition.
THE ROARING TWENTIES
How did the 1920s Economic Boom change America?
Did everyone benefit from the economic boom?
How Far did American society change in the 1920s?
Learning Objectives
Know - Who did not benefit from the boom.

Understand - The reasons why certain groups did not benefit from the boom.

Skills - Cause and Consequence and diversity
Success Criteria
What happened in America in the 1920s?
TASK
Sort the cards into the Venn Diagram Diagram
Political

Economic

Social
This means to do with money.
This means to with people's normal lives
This means to do with the government and political groups.
Stick the cards on to your Venn Diagram and then stick the Venn Diagram into your book:

HOMEWORK
Design a cover page for the new topic
It should include:

1) The title: America in the 1920s
2) Some pictures and/or drawings that are related to 1920s America- these need to be labeled and explained.



Venn Diagram
Political
Social and Political
All three
Economic and Social
Social
Economic
Political and Economic
Answer the following questions:

1) Do you think all people's lives got better in the 1920s? Use evidence to support your answer.

2) If you had to say which category saw the most amount of change during the 1920s which do you think it would be? Use evidence to support your answer.

3) Which do you think came first: economic, social or political change? Explain your answer.
Women are allowed to vote in elections for the first time in 1920.
Quiz Time!
Close your books.
Dr Brodie's Expectations - The 3 Rs
1) Be Ready - Come to class prepared to work. This means having all the equipment needed for the lesson and having an open and inquisitive mind.

2) Be Responsible - Participate, pay attention, make your best effort and ask for help when you need it.

3) Be Respectful - Listen when others are talking, put your hand up to answer questions and encourage others' learning.
Do we agree these are fair?
Learning Objectives
Know - The key features and trends of 1920s America

Understand - The complex nature of 1920s America.

Skills - Chronology - Developing a chronological framework of 1920s America
Success Criteria
Can describe the key features of America in the 1920s.

Can categorise the key features of America in the 1920s.

Can draw links between the key features of America in the 1920s.
Odd One Out?
This photograph show shows a successful female film star in 1929. Does this prove the position of all women in the USA had improved by the end of the 1920s? Use the source and your own knowledge to explain your answer. (7 marks)
Success Criteria
Level 2 - Accepts or rejects the photograph on basis of its provenance. (2)
E.g. The photograph is not proof because it is a staged photograph of a film star.

Level 3- Answer explains the message of the source and rejects it simply because of the provenance of the source. (3-4)
e.g. This is not proof. It portrays a film star and shows that there were opportunities for women to become famous, but it is only one filmstar.

Level 4 - Uses contextual knowledge to show either that the position of women in American society had improved or not. (5-6)

Level 5 - Uses contextual knowledge of the position of women in society to present a two sided argument. Explains that there was relative improvement for some women, but not for others. (7)
Learning Objectives

Knowledge - Overview of the experience of women in 1920s USA.

Understanding - How to answer a 7 mark question.


Skills - Practise at writing a 7 mark question.
1) Take 2 minutes to analyse the source and 10 writing.
2) 2 - For a 'prove' question it has to be two-sided.
3) P - State your judgement - Does it prove? e,g, No, but...
4) O - Own knowledge - what is the context, what do you know about the period.
5)D - Details from the source - What details are there to support your argument?
6) Practise makes perfect.
2POD or not 2POD?
Activity
Create a Mind Map on the experiences of women in 1920s America on a double page in your red book (landscape style) using pages 354-355 in Walsh for information.







Success Criteria
Bronze
- Separates information into political, economic, social and cultural headings and includes facts.

Silver
- Does Bronze and adds colour coding to show change and continuity.

Gold

- Does Silver and Bronze and draws link between the factors and highlights the most important changes. Brings in infomation not in the book.
Women in the 1920s
Economic
Political
Social
Cultural
INTOLERANCE QUIZ
Say what you see.
How many themes can you draw out? e.g. Dance.
How many of these did you get?
Theme Evidence
Dance Women at the front

Black Cultural African American Bar?
Renaissance/Popularity

Music Jazz musicians at back

Racism White man with black
face/white woman
watching

Women's Liberation Clothing, socialising,
dancing, employment,no
chaperons?

Prohibition Nightclub/speakeasy?
Which statement is correct?
Choose one statement you think is correct. Justify why you chose it.
Try and write your own statement on one of the 5 sources.
Key Facts
Many younger urban women were able to break free of traditional roles.
They wore daring clothes, smoked and drank in public.
They went out with men without a chaperon.
Women were targeted by advertising.
Women were less likely to stay in unhappy marriages - there were twice as many divorces in 1929 than in 1914.
Photo Rotate
1) Your have 3 minutes to analyse each source and complete the relevant part of the worksheet.

2) Move round the room in a clockwise direction at the end of each 3 minutes.

3) One student from each group presents their findings on the last source.
Key Facts
Key Facts
SOURCE E
In 1920 over 8 million American women were in work. By 1929 this figure was 10 million.

Only 20% of working women were married.

Most women worked in agriculture, in domestic services (e.g. as cooks or maids) or in manufacturing.

Women were paid less than men - this was one reason they were employed - they were cheaper!!
Most women remained at home and concentrated on raising a family.

A large section of American society was very conservative and was upset by moves to transform women's traditional role.

Some women began to compete in sport. There growing numbers of female athletes in the US Olympic teams during the 1920s.

In 1921 Margaret Sanger established the American Birth Control League. This pushed for better family planning in American society.
Key Facts
The 19th Ammendment, passed in 1920, it guarenteed all women the vote.

Women may have had the vote but very few were elected - they were considered unelectable.

The likelihood of women voting depended on their class, race and age and religion - Catholics were less likely to vote.

Politicians started trying to win women's votes - Women's issues such as maternity care.
SOURCE D
SOURCE A
Key Facts
Key Facts
SOURCE B
SOURCE C
Black women were less likely to enjoy the same rights as white women - many were prevented from voting and working.

Almost all suffered from prejudice and some from the violent racism of groups like the Ku Klux Klan.

Over 1.8 million black women (and men) migrated from the rural South to the urban North. This was called the Great Migration.

There were a number of successful black jazz musicians - these were mainly from urban centres such as Harlem in New York.
Success Criteria
B - Can describe what is happening in the sources.
S - Does B and can also explain what can be learned/infered from the sources.
G - Does B and S and also explains cannot be learned/infered from the sources. They use existing knowledge to help them. They also draw compare/link the sources.

Was Henry Ford a Hero or a Villain?
Learning Objectives
Know - Who Henry Ford was and what he did.

Understand - How Henry Ford can be viewed in a number of different ways.

Skills - Using evidence to build an interpretation.
Success Criteria
Now let's peer assess and present
Can describe the life of Henry Ford.


Can explain the life of Henry Ford with reference to his positive and negative impact.

Can use evidence to make a judgement on Henry Ford, assessing the extent to which he was a hero or a villain

Can explain why different groups of people would have different views of Henry Ford.
Was Henry Ford a hero or villain?
Success Criteria
Can describe the life of Henry Ford.


Can explain the life of Henry Ford with reference to his positive and negative impact.

Can use evidence to make a judgement on Henry Ford, assessing the extent to which he was a hero or a villain

Can explain why different groups of people would have different views of Henry Ford.
Learning Outcomes:
 
Bronze: Can describe the life of Henry Ford.
Silver: Can explain his life with reference to his positive and negative impact.
Gold: Can use evidence to make a judgement on Henry Ford, assessing the extent to which he was a hero or villain.
Platinum: Can explain why different groups of people would have different views of Henry Ford.
Hero
Villain
TASK
: These cards show information about the life and values of Henry Ford. You need to organise them into whether they make Henry Ford a hero or villain.

Success Criteria:
Discuss each card in your pair.
Evaluate whether each card suggests Henry Ford was a hero or a villain and place it on the opinion line.
Chose a card you think has been most important in helping you come to your overall judgement and think about why this is.
Opinion Line
STARTER - Heads and Tails
Assembly Line
Mass Production
The production of large amounts of products which are all the same.
the process where parts of a product are built bit by bit in a sequence.
Consumer Society
Henry Ford (1863-1947)
Henry Ford founded the Ford Motor Company in 1903. He became one of the richest and most famous people of his era. Ford is still one of the most successful car companies in the world.
However, he is a controversial figure. Some people see him as a villain and some as a hero. Your task is to find out why and come to your own judgement.
Manufacturing
The production things for sale using machines and the labour of people.
A society where buying and selling goods is the most important activity of people.
Learning Objectives
Know - Features of the economic boom.

Understand - How the economic boom changed America.

Skills - Change and Continuity
Success Criteria
TASK
How would your life change if we did not have:
Cinema and Films
Spectator sports like football.
Advertising.
Radio
Magazines
Department Stores.
Flights
Fridges
Washing Machines
Think, Pair, Share
Can describe features of the economic boom.


Can explain how the economic boom changed American society.

Can make a judgement on which was the most significant change.
Key Question: How did the economic boom change America?
Which was change the most significant?
A) Advertising
B) Consumer Goods
C) Spectator Sports
D) Cinema
Aim for half a side.
Use the evidence you have collected to make your argument.
Can name groups which did not benefit from the boom.



Can explain reasons why groups did not benefit from the boom.


Can make a judgement using evidence on which group was the biggest losers.

TASK
What do you think FLOP stands
for?
Think, Pair, Share
ANSWER
F= Farmers

L= Low income workers

O = Old Industries

P= Poor Ethnic Minorities


What impression of life in America in the 1920s do these images give?
Copy this table into your books and then categorise the information into the correct columns
Farmers
Low income
workers
Old Industries
Poor Ethnic Minorities
Use the information you have collected to answer these questions:

1) Why did some people not benefit from the economic boom. Use evidence to support your answer.

2) Which group did worst during the economic boom. Explain your answer.
TASK
Watch these clips why do you think this film might have made people want to join the Ku Klux Klan?
Why did the Ku Klux Klan become popular?
Learning Objectives
Know - The activities of the Ku Klux Klan

Understand - Why the Ku Klux Klan became popular

Skills - Cause and Consequence
Success Criteria
Describes the activities of the Ku Klux Klan


Explains why the Ku Klux Klan became popular.

Can analyse sources to interpret different views of the Ku Klux Klan.
What do these images tell us about the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s?
boom
Ku Klux Klan
Henry Ford
mass production
immigration
prohibition
ethnic minorities
farmers
advertising
spectator sports
production line
cinema
flappers
gangsters
isolationism

Explain the message of the cartoon. Try to use your knowledge you have gained in this lesson.
The Ku Klux Klan
*Terrorist organisation in the USA.
*At its peak there 5 million members in 1923.
*Most members were in the Southern States.
*Its aim was to keep blacks, Catholics, Jews and homosexuals in "their place."
*They carried out "lynchings."
Learning Objectives
Know - The different types of experiences of black people in 1920s America.

Understand - Why experiences for black people varied.

Skills - Diversity
Success Criteria
Can describe experiences of black people in America in the 1920s.

Can explain experiences of black people in America in the 1920s.

Can make a judgement supported by evidence on nature of experiences of black people in America in the 1920s.
ACTIVITY
Duluth, Minnesota (1920)
Do you think this a normal experience for African Americans in the 1920s?
Did life get better for African Americans in the 1920s?
The experience of black people in 1920s America was overall negative. Do you agree with this statement?
YES NO
If this is the answer what is the question?
1. Segregation
2. Harlem Renaissance
3. Jim Crow Laws
4. NACCP
5. Poverty
TASK
Separate the cards into the good and bad experiences for black people in 1920s America and stick them into your books.
GOOD
BAD
What are these people doing?
How do you think they are feeling?
TASK
Did life get better for African Americans in 1920s America?
Success Criteria:
*Use the evidence in your table.
*Consider both sides of the argument.
*Make a judgement.
*Include a conclusion.
Now write a two-sided argument answering the following question:
*Pressure from women's and Christian groups.
*The effect of saloons and alcohol on the population.
*Concerns about the impact of saloons on the workforce
*Impact of World War One – intolerance and nationalism.
*Rural vs Urban America.
Key Reasons for Prohibition

Prohibition Cocktail
Write a slogan to encourage people to stop drinking in 1920s America.
Think rhymes.
Think Metaphors.
Think puns.
Disagree
Agree
The campaigning of women was the most important reason for the implementation of prohibition
Why was Prohibition Introduced?
One question the lesson has raised?
Two words/things that have
made an impression on you.
Three key words that are important for prohibition.
Pour out all your knowledge!!
Learning Objectives
Know - What prohibition involved.

Understand - Why prohibition was introduced.

Skills -Causation
Success Criteria
Describes reasons for prohibition.


Explains the reasons for prohibition.


Makes a judgement on the most important reason for prohibition.
What are the two things she is carrying?

What would she use them for?
http://www.history.com/topics/prohibition/videos/bet-you-didnt-know-prohibition?m=528e394da93ae&s=undefined&f=1&free=false
http://www.history.com/topics/prohibition/videos/america-goes-dry-with-prohibition?m=528e394da93ae&s=undefined&f=1&free=false
Why did Prohibition Fail?
Learning Objectives
Know - The features of prohibition.

Understand - The reasons why prohibition failed.

Skills - Causation
Success Criteria
Makes a judgement on what the most important reason for the failure of prohibition.


Explains the reasons why prohibition fails.


Describes features of prohibition.

Prohibition Video
1)How was prohibition enforced?

2)What were the consequences of prohibition?
True or False
1)Speakeasies got their name from the fact that you had to whisper a code word or name through a locked door in order to get in.
2) The Ku Klux Klan supported prohibition.
3) Religious groups who supported prohibition tried to get the
4) Bible rewritten to remove all references to alcohol.
5) It was illegal to consume alcohol during prohibition.
Extension - The most important reason why prohibition failed was because people continued to want to drink. How far do you agree with this statement?
Was prohibition a good idea?
YES
NO
TASK
The year is 1932 and prohibition is failing. Write a letter to the President of the United States, Herbert Hoover, explaining why you think prohibition should be ended.
Success Criteria
Include evidence from today's lesson.
Explain which reason is the most important.
Explain why people have not supported prohibition.
Explain the effects on the country. E.g. It has caused more crime.
Aim to write about 3/4 of a page.
TASK
Turn to pages 60-61. Read the pages and answer the questions.
What can these photographs taken during prohibition tell us about it?
Learning Objectives
Know - Details about Al Capone's life

Understand - How Al Capone's life can be interpreted in different ways.

Skills - Interpretations
Success Criteria
Al Capone Facebook Profile
Use pages 64-5 to find out information about Al Capone and design a Facebook profile for him.
TASK:
"Al Capone was a hero." How far do you agree with this statement?
This is a picture of Al Capone, on the front cover of "Time," one of the most important magazines in America in 1930.

Only significant people would make it to the front cover.

Explain why you think Al Capone was one of the most significant people of the 1920s.

*Use evidence from today's lesson to help.
Makes a judgment on the significance of Al Capone.

Creates an interpretation of Al Capone.


Describes details of Al Capone's life.
How significant was Al Capone?
Dingbats
Work out today's topic.
Were Sacco and Vanzetti Guilty?
Sacco and Vanzetti were guilty.
YES
NO
Learning Objectives
Know - Who Sacco and Vanzetti were and what they believed in.

Understand - Why their conviction is controversial

Skills - Interpretations
Success Criteria
Makes a judgement, supported by evidence, on whether Sacco and Vanzetti were guilty.
Describes the Sacco and Vanzetti case.
Explains why the Sacco and Vanzetti case was so significant.
TASK - Red Scare Meet and Greet
The Red Scare
In the 1920s many Americans were worried about mass immigration. After the Russian Revolution of 1917, many Americans feared that immigrants from Europe would attempt a communist takeover of the country. In 1919 and 1920 a series of arrests on suspected Communists took place. These were called the Palmer Raids.
What is the message of this cartoon?
This is a radical who does not like government.
Bartolomeo Vanzetti and Nicola Sacco. two Italian immigrants were executed on 23 August 1927 for robbery and murder. What can these photographs tell us about their execution?
Who?
Evidence
Guilty or Not Guilty?
Were Sacco and Vanzetti guilty or not? Use evidence to support your answer.
Learning Objectives
Know - Key trends of the 1920s.

Understand - The extent of change to people's social lives in 1920s America.

Skills - Change and Continuity
Success Criteria
Makes a judgement on how far people's social lives in 1920s America changed.


Explains why changes rto people's social lives took place.


Describes the changes to people's social lives in 1920s America.
Can we work out what is so special about this film "The Jazz Singer" (1921).

Hint: listen to what is said at the start.
Cinema
Feature
How did it change?
Transport
Clubs and dancing
Did life improve for everyone? Explain your answer.

Talk about: Remember to PEE.
*Black people.
*Farmers.
*immigrants.
Sex
Music
Who benefited from the change?
Radio
TASK - Use pp. 36-40 to complete this table
Was the main cause of the changes in 1920s America prohibition or the economic boom? Explain your answer.
Learning Objectives
Know - Key Experiences for different women in the 1920s.

Understand - How far the 1920s was a period of change for women in America.

Skills - Change and Continuity.
Success Criteria
Makes a judgement, supported by evidence, identifying the most significant change for women in 1920s America.

Explains how far society changed for women using evidence.

Describe key features of women's experience in 1920s America.
The number of women in work rose from 8 million in 1920 to 10 million in 1930. A 25% increase.

They mainly worked in manufacturing but were also commonly teachers and secretaries.
Use these images to make predictions about how life changed for women in 1920s America.
Divorce rate per 1000 American marriages.
How far did life for women improve in the 1920s?
TASK
The year is 1930. You are members of the
National Woman's Party
(NWP)- even you boys! You have been campaigning for equal rights for women for over 10 years.

You will have to write a report saying how far women's lives have improved in the 1920s and what issues the NWP should focus on in the future.

Before you write your report, you will have to listen to some key figures from the time and collect evidence (which is around the room), in order to compile your report.
Write your report: "How far did women's lives improve in the 1920s?"
Steps to success:
1) Say what your overall judgement is.
2) Say what has improved and for which women.
3) Say which was the most important change and why.
4) Say what has stayed the same and for which women.
5) Say where further improvement to the lives of women could be made and for which women.
Remember PEE!!!
Success Criteria
Makes a judgement, supported by evidence, identifying the most significant change for women in 1920s America.

Explains how far society changed for women using evidence.

Describe key features of women's experience in 1920s America.
Alice Paul
(1885-1977)
Founder of the Woman's National Party
Eleanor Roosevelt
1884-1962
Campaigner on women's issues.
How far did American society change in the 1920s?
Learning Objectives
Know - What makes a good essay.

Understand - How to approach a question which asks about "change."

Skills - Change and Continuity, Essay Writing.
Success Criteria
Describes some changes and continuities in American society in the 1920s.

Explains the causes changes and continuities in American society in the 1920s.

Explains and begins to analyse the nature and extent of change in American society in the 1920s.

Fully Analyses and identifies the nature and extent of change in 1920s America.
What are the important words in this question?
What do we need to consider when talking about change?
Think, Pair, Share
Steps to success
1) Use evidence from lessons to support your argument.
2) Use the textbooks to fill any gaps you may have.
3) Think about who things changed for.
4) Think about how far they changed.
5) Think about the reasons they changed.
How did people's social lives change in the 1920s?
Were the 1920s Roaring?
Learning Objectives
Know - Key people and events of the 1920s.

Understand - The key themes of the 1920s and how they are linked.

Skills - Diversity
Success Criteria
We are starting a new topic on 1920s America. Design a slogan using these images for the decade.
E.g. The 1960s were known as the "Swinging Sixties."
America in the 1920s was roaring.
Yes
No
Describes some key people of 1920s America.
Identifies and explains some key themes of 1920s America.
Makes a judgement, supported by evidence, on how roaring the 1920s were.
TASK-1920s Meet and Greet.
Each one of you has a card with a famous person of the 1920s. You need to meet as many people as possible to build up an overview of what the 1920s was like.
Name
What they did
Theme
TASK: How roaring were the 1920s?
Steps to success:

1) Aim for about 3/4 of a page to 1 page.
2) Make a judgement on the question.
3) Consider both sides of the argument.
4) Use evidence and examples you have gathered in this lesson to support your argument.
5) Include a conclusion.

Success Criteria
Describes some key people of 1920s America.
Identifies and explains some key themes of 1920s America.
Makes a judgement, supported by evidence, on how roaring the 1920s were.
Full transcript