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Thank you, Ma'am - By Langston Hughes

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by

Sharon Schwarz

on 14 December 2016

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Transcript of Thank you, Ma'am - By Langston Hughes

1923
1926
1939
1920
1928
Thank you, Ma'am - By Langston Hughes
Lecture Notes

a cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place in Harlem, New York, spanned the 1920s - considered to be a rebirth of African-American arts.

Reading Focus
Tier 2 Academic Vocabulary
Contextual
roomer
blue-jeaned sitter
presentable
frail
mistrusted

Today's Focus
Theme:
Unit Theme - Coming of Age
General Characteristics of Coming of Age Genre
protagonist gets an "education in life," usually in a non-traditional manner
Direct Instruction
willow-wild
half-nelson
kitchenette-furnished
suede
stoop
latching
barren
The central idea, message or sometimes lesson an author is trying to convey
*Specifically, how do certain lines of dialogue work to convey or
infer
theme?
What does the term "Coming of Age" mean to you?
protagonist grows and changes from youth to adulthood - especially in their world-view or paradigm
emphasis on dialogue over action and plot development.
Reading Focus
Examine the ACTION and DIALOGUE
Characterization
Ms.Jones
Words
Actions
Method
Evidence
Trait Revealed
ROGER
Method
Evidence
Trait Revealed
Words
Actions
Work with your group:
1. Choose one of your theme statements
2. Find a line of DIALOGUE that specifically helps to reveal or support your theme.
3. Write down how this line(s) works to reveal and support the theme. (2-3 sentences)
Plot Diagram
Exposition
Rising Action
Climax
Falling Action
Resolution
Unit Theme: Coming of Age
1. Does our story fit the "coming of age" model? How? Provide text evidence and be prepared to defend and support your response.
Static
Dynamic
Static
Dynamic
Do Now: Read the poem. Then discuss and jot down some notes on the following:
1. What do you think the poem is literally about?
2. What images/comparisons are created in the poem?
3. Take a stab at the theme (message/lesson author wants to convey.)
Langston Hughes
an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist - earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form called jazz poetry.
The Harlem Renaissance:
Viewing Focus: 3-5 facts from each video.
Reading Focus
How do writers develop the setting of their story?

As we read, what are some details that Hughes provides to help us picture the action?

What do these details reveal about the characters? Explain.
Do Now: Read/listen to the poem and jot down your ideas in the appropriate space.
Dreams
Langston Hughes, 1902 - 1967

Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
That cannot fly.

Hold fast to dreams
For when dreams go
Life is a barren field
Frozen with snow.
Metaphor:
A comparison between two things that does not rely on like or as.
1. What two metaphors appear in this poem?
2. Explain the connotation of each metaphor. (Feeling associated with image)
3. State the theme (message)
Lecture: Today's Focus: Characterization
Characterization:
Direct:
Indirect:
Static:
Dynamic:
A character who stays the same and does not change
A character who undergoes a serious change.
Task: Create a chart that shows what we learn about Miss Bates and Roger from their actions and words.
Looks
or
or
Do Now: Read and analyze the poem.
Extended Metaphor:
a comparison between two unlike things that continues throughout a series of sentences in a paragraph or lines in a poem
1. What is the extended metaphor? What two things are being compared?
2. Give several concrete images Hughes uses.
3. Note the connotation of at least 5 words.
4. What is the message of the poem?
Question Generation Steps
1. Read the text.
2. Find the important idea.
3. Turn the important idea into a question.
4. Answer the question
Lecture: Questioning Techniques
1.
Today's Task:



Review the text. Working with a partner, write and discuss the answers to 3 higher order thinking questions.
Be ready to present your questions to the class, if asked.
Use your "cheat sheet" if necessary at first and mark your book with post-its.


Turn and Talk: Answer the questions. What is the difference between first two questions and last two?
1. What is the problem in the story?
2. What is the setting of the story?
3. What character traits can you assign Ms. Jones? Provide text evidence that supports these traits.
4. Do you agree with Ms. Bates' handling of Roger's crime? Would you have done the same thing? Why or why not. Explain
Full transcript