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Argumentative Writing 8th Grade

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Coty Neal

on 19 February 2013

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Transcript of Argumentative Writing 8th Grade

How can I write my argument? Let's look at our new scale and update our new progress monitoring! What will I be expected to do in a argumentative essay? 1. You will be writing an argument based on your opinion of a topic.
2. You must support your opinion with evidence from a text. How will argumentative writing be different than essays I have done in the past? So, if we're writing to a text, what will we be reading? How can I plan my argument? (Step #3) We will plan our arguments by carefully organizing them with a flee (tree+flow) map. Atrgumentative writing is a type of writing in which you are creating an argument to support a position with convincing reasons and evidence. What is ARGUMENTATIVE writing? For this essay, we will be analyzing cyber-bullying. What is PAC/F? How can I form my argument? (Step #2) You can form your argument by analyzing the pros and cons (by first looking at both sides of the argument).

Use a divided circle map! What is the purpose of argumentative writing? People use argumentative writing on a daily basis to:
1. To change a rule or policy
2. To change a person's attitude/behavior
3. To change a situation
4. To ask for money or votes
5. To ask for a privilege
6. To ask for support of a cause PAC is purpose, audience, context (situation), and format. Why do I need to consider PAC before I write? What will our prompt choices be? 1. Because of the recent outbreak in cyber-bullying (resulting in teen depression and suicide), Facebook is considering raising the required age of all Facebook users to 18.

Write to persuade Mark Zuckerberg whether or not he should consider this new rule. 2. Jarman Middle School has been experiencing an outbreak of cyber-bullying.

Write a letter to your school convincing your classmates why they should not be bullying each other online. Discuss your answer with your shoulder partner! How can I analyze PAC? You will analyze PAC using a tree map! Let's Practice! What are the parts of a persuasive introduction? There are three parts to a persuasive introduction: interest catcher, opinion sentence, and thesis statement. What is an interest catcher? An interest catcher is something the author does to peak the reader's interest and make them want to read more. What are the different types of interest catchers? What is the opinion sentence? What is the thesis statement? Example: "I step into the classroom, uncomfortable in my own skin. I can feel everyone staring at my too-large wool sweater. The green sweater itches, and I can see kids, a couple of girls, smirking at me." The opinion sentence is the sentence you write to explain your position on the topic. Example: "Dr. Cartwright, if you've ever felt uncomfortable in your clothes, you'll understand why we need uniforms at Howard Middle School." Your thesis will consist of arguments that you put forward to your reader, which you will go on to prove in your essay. Example: "Not only would uniforms be less expensive than designer clothes, but they would also reduce bullying, and help students focus more at school." Now let's practice putting persuasive introductions together with a game! Rules:
1. You will be working with your shoulder partner to piece together four different introductions.
2. So, we will have four rounds.
3. When you and your partner have solved the paragraph, raise your hand.
4. The first partner group to solve the paragraph correctly will win a prize! What are the parts of a body paragraph? Every body paragraph *must* have a topic sentence, explanation, and example. The topic sentence is your argument in a complete sentence. The explanation is a re-wording of your topic sentence. The example is an example of your topic sentence. Example of a body paragraph:
Uniforms are less expensive than designer clothes.
In other words, uniforms are more cost effective for families on a tight budget.
For example, a pair of designer jeans at Lucky cost $100. But, a pair of uniform khakis could cost as little as $20. How do you transition from one paragraph to another in the essay? We are going to practice the topic sentence, explanation, and example parts of a body paragraph with some art! What adjective could we use to describe this person? Topic Sentence: Marilyn was a vivacious kind of person.
Explanation: In other words, Marilyn was full of life and excitement.
Example: For example, she loved to travel and explore the world. Now, you're going to write the beginning of a body paragraph on this piece of art with your shoulder partner. "Turquoise Marilyn" By: Andy Warhol "Mona Lisa" By: Leonardo DaVinci Topic Sentence: Mona was a ___________ kind of person. Directions for Project:
You are going to write a detailed body paragraph, beginning with a topic sentence about "Mona." What else is necessary in a body paragraph? After the topic sentence, explanation, and example, you must include elaborations. What are the expository elaborations? We will use five expository elaborations:
1. Describe with literal language
2. Describe with figurative language
3. Cause and Effect Sentence
4. Compare and Contrast Sentence
5. Anecdote Let's Practice the Expository Elaborations: 1. Describe with literal language:
Marilyn's wardrobe was a mixture of bright, vivid colors, provocatively showing lots of skin. 2. Describe with figurative language:
Marilyn is like a lioness, fierce and proud. 3. Cause and Effect Sentence:
Because Marilyn is so fierce, she is never scared of any adventure. 4. Compare and Contrast Sentence:
She is different than most people because her confidence is intimidating. 5. Anecdote:
Once, Marilyn went on an African safari and camped beside a pride of lions. What are the persuasive elaborations? The persuasive elaborations are:
1. Authoritative Quotes
2. Facts and Statistics
3. Expert/Witness Statement
4. Counter Argument
5. Rhetorical Question Let's practice the persuasive elaborations! 5. Rhetorical Question:
Wouldn't you love a vivacious friend like Marilyn? 1. Authoritative Quotes:
John F. Kennedy was once quoted as saying that "I would rather be at one of Marilyn's parties than anywhere else in the world." 2. Facts and Statistics:
It is a little known fact that Marilyn has sailed her gigantic yacht across the Bermuda triangle - all by herself! 3. Expert/Witness Statement:
Marilyn's personal doctor once told me that she liked to dive with sharks on a regular basis. 4. Counter Argument:
Some people have claimed that Marilyn is a boring and dull person; however, all of her friends agree that they have never met a more adventurous person. Still don't believe that Marilyn was a vivacious person? In your essay, you must include transitional words to move your read through one paragraph to another.

Let's look at our handout! Why do you think transitions are important? How do I wrap up my essay? You need to finish your essay with a conclusion as your last paragraph. What are the parts of a conclusion? The parts of a conclusion are: Restate argument, Summarize Arguments, Solicit Support. What does it mean to solicit support? When you solicit support, you are asking your reader to do something for you now that you've persuaded them. Conclusion Example:
Restate Argument: Dr. Cartwright, it is my firm belief that we need uniforms at Howard.
Summarize Arguments: As I've stated, uniforms will be cost efficient, decrease bullying, and help students pay attention in class.
Solicit Support: Please consider researching all the positive benefits of uniforms, and I'm sure that you will also find them necessary for our school!
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