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Of Mice and Men George

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Justine Ho

on 18 June 2014

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Transcript of Of Mice and Men George

Like Lennie, John Steinbeck is able to describe George with a few specific characteristics, being "small and quick, dark of face, with restless eyes and sharp, strong features. Every part of him was defined: small, strong hands, slender arms, a thin and bony nose." (pg 19)

He has a strong ideals, fighting to one day live the American Dream and this influences other characters to wish the same, including Lennie, Candy, and Crook. Although short-tempered and rude to Lennie, as the novel develops, it's revealed that not only does Lennie need George, George also needs Lennie, for he is scared of loneliness.

George is also the leader between himself and Lennie, shown in the quote “Even in the open one stayed behind the other.” However, even with the commitment of George trying to protect Lennie, he doesn't realize just how strong and out of control Lennie is, leading their American Dream to collapse and the fatal tragedy.

Throughout the novel, George Milton is shown to be one of the characters who change and develop. In the beginning of the novel, he expresses his vision of his American Dream, as shown in the quote "we'll have a big vegetable patch and a rabbit hutch and chickens," (pg 33) but at the end, he finally accepts that their American Dream is an unrealistic fantasy, showing his development and his growing maturity, unlike Lennie who practically stays the same within the whole novel.
Summary
Key quote 2
“ “Lennie!” he said sharply. “Lennie, for God’s sakes don’t drink so much.” pg 20


Who he interact with
Lennie
Even from the beginning of the novel, George is known to be the leader between both himself and Lennie, as shown in the quote
"They had walked in single file down the path, and even in the open on stayed behind the other." page 19
Further into the book, it is revealed that this leadership is not a shallow relationship, but is quite dangerous, as shown in the quote
"I turn to Lennie and says, "Jump in" An' he jumps. Couldn't swim a stroke." pg 66.

Not only does Lennie need George, George is also seen to need Lennie. In the beginning of the novel, George is shown to be scared to be alone, as seen in the quote
"Cause I want you to stay with me." pg 31.


Slim
There is a strong relationship between George and Slim. Slim is very understanding, he knows the importance of the relationship between Lennie and George, as can be seen in this quote
''He ain't mean,' said Slim. 'I can see Lennie ain't a bit mean.''
George shows a symbol of trust within Slim, since he's the only one that he open to about the incident of Lennie and the Red Dressed Girl on the ranch, as seen on
pg 68.


of Mice and Men
George Milton Analysis
Key quote 1
“The first man was small and quick, dark of face, with restless eyes and sharp, strong features. Every part of him was defined: small, strong hands, slender arms, a thin and bony nose.” pg 19



Key quote 3
"I should of knew … I guess maybe way back in my head I did." pg 130
Key quote 4
" 'No, Lennie. Look down there acrost the river, like you can almost see place,' " pg 147
George doesn’t treat Lennie very nicely
He is trying to warn Lennie not to get sick
This sets their relationship of George as the leader and Lennie as the follower.
Shows his commitment in protecting his friend.

Key quote 5
" With us it ain't like that. We got a future." pg 32
Total opposite of Lennie.
Even if he is small, his features are sharp, defined, thin and bony. (opposite of the big blob Lennie)
When you think of that, it makes them think of knives, sharp and deadly.
“Small, strong arms” - Even though his arms are small, he has a lot of responsibilities.
“Restless Eyes” - His eyes are always looking out for trouble (show leadership)

George knew that this will happen someday back in his head, something even worse than what happened in Weed
He accepted the fact that the American Dream will not be able to continue without Lennie
He knew the dream will never happen because it is just a dream. He didn't want to be the spoiler so he didn't say anything although he knew in the back of his head
Shows the development of character
Instead of Lennie dying painfully and sadly by the hands of other, George wants him to die peacefully and his own hand (unlike Candy and his dog.)
Shows that George does what's best for Lennie, even though he himself doesn't like it.
Shows their strong relationship between them - supporting one and another
Friendship
Although they've got no family, they treat each other like brothers and sisters
Their American Dream = their future
They think they will succeed in their dream when it is impossible
Chapter 1
Sets the scene
Introducing Lennie and George
(comparison)
American Dream

Chapter 2
Tyler Ranch
Curly fight
Curley's wife enters
Slim enters

Chapter 3
Red Dressed Girl story
Magazine (American Dream)
Candy (American Dream)

Chapter 4
Crooks Enter
Crooks says George won't come back.
Racial Inequality
Candys wife verbal fight.

Chapter 5
Lennie kills Curleys wife
Hunt for Lennie Begins

Chapter 6
George kills Lennie.
Full transcript