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Sexual Assault in Fraternity and Sorority Life

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Jon Allen

on 28 April 2014

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Transcript of Sexual Assault in Fraternity and Sorority Life

Whats on the surface?
Sexual Assault
Statistics and
Information
Consequences
Accelerants
Areas of concern
Alcohol
Illegal drugs
"date rape drugs"

How to curb the risk
BYOB
Limiting types of alcohol
Dump out policies and practices
Sober monitors
Mindset
Hypermasculinity is:
Associated with men conforming to typical gender roles including desired physical appearance
Associated with a higher likelihood of violence towards women and sexual aggression
Associated with public displays of homophobia


Opportunity
Areas of concern
Unregulated social events
Chapter houses
Lack of sober monitors


How to curb the risk
Social event registration
Designated social event areas
Live-in advisers
Individualized risk management plans
How to curb hypermasculinity culture
Sexual Assault in Fraternity and Sorority Life
Beyond what you see on the surface
Policies
National
Organization
All national organizations have anti-sexual assault policies.
Fraternal Information and Programming Group (FIPG)
What many fraternities and sororities use as a basis for their risk management policies
Governing
Council
Interfraternity Council (IFC), Multicultural Greek Council (MGC), National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), Panhellenic Council (Panhellenic)
Councils often have anti-sexual assault policies
Institution
Student Code of Conduct
Fraternity and Sorority Life Policies
Chapter
Definitions
Hypermasculinity

Rape Myth

TP
4
E
A psychological term for the exaggeration of male stereotypical behavior, such as an emphasis on physical strength, aggression, and sexuality.
Theory
drives
Philosophy
drive
Policy
drives
Practice
drives
Prevention
drives
Evaluation
It's important to remember that not all
fraternities and fraternity men endorse
a culture where sexual assault can happen.
When approaching this situation it is
important to recognize that a community
cannot be defined by one chapter.
(Humphrey, 2000)
The Current Approach
to Prevention
Using TP4E
Theory:
Student development theories.

Philosophy:
Students should be able to exist in a safe environment and perform better in such environments.

Policy:
Students are not to commit sexual assault and students should be educated on the topic.

Practice:
Provide presentations for students and punish those who do not follow the student code of conduct.

Prevention:
Target high risk groups and provide more education for them.

Evaluation:
Determine if sexual assault reporting its up and if sexual assaults are decreasing.

Classes
University of Missouri hypermasculinity course for fraternity men
Guyland
Becoming a Resonant Leader
New member programming- Think About It
Peer Education
Trained to talk about:
Alcohol/Drugs
Hypermasculinity
Sexual assault
Have it be fraternity men
Put educated people into the community to intervene in situations.
Trainings
Bystander Invention Training (fraternities and sororities)
Giving those who want to intervene the skills to do so
Helping individuals recognize when they need to step in
Education (presentations)
Collaborative programming
Band aid solutions
10.3% of all rapes on college campuses happen in fraternity houses
55% of all gang rapes happen in fraternity houses
Sorority women are 74% more likely to be raped than non-sorority women
Fraternity men are equally as likely to reject Rape Myth Acceptance as their peers
Sorority women are more likely to reject Rape Myth Acceptance
Sorority women are more likely intervene in a potential sexual assault situation than fraternity men

THERE IS
STILL A
PROBLEM
Fraternities
Areas of concern
9 in 10 college women who have been sexually assaulted knew their attacker
Chapter houses
Social events in high risk areas

How to curb the risk
Education
Live-in advisers
Encouraging behaviors that can reduce risk
Not going out alone
Making sure you have someone picking you up and setting up a time to do so
Sororities
Fraternities and Sororities
Sororities
Areas of concern
Lack of reporting
Fear of being a community outcast

Strategies for change
Assigning approachable advisers
Creating anonymous reporting structures
Empowerment campaign
Take Back the Night events
"I Support..." posters
Fraternities
Areas of concern
Lack of reporting
Fear of intervention
Lack of follow up

Strategies for change
Assigning approachable advisers
Education on the consequences of not intervening
Sexual assaults occuring
Chapter being shut down
Lawsuits against the chapter
Values based training
"Real men are..." campaign
Before starting it needs to be noted that this presentation is primarily based on research surrounding sexual assault involving men sexually assaulting women.
Students who exhibit hypermasculinity often do so in social settings around peers and rely on objectification of women and homophobia to assert masculinity. (Harris III, 2008)
Inaccurate beliefs concerning circumstance, situations, and characteristics that place a level of blame on victims of rape.
References

Bannon, S. R., Brosi, M. W., Foubert, J. D. (2013). Sorority women's and fraternity men's rape myth acceptance and bystander attitudes. Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, Vol. 50(1), p72-87.

Foubert, J. D., Newberry, J. T., Tatum, J. L. (2007).
Behavior differences seven months later: Effects of a rape prevention program
. Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, Vol. 44(4), p. 728-749.

Harris III, F. (2008) Deconstructing masculinity: A qualitative study of college men's masculine conceptualizations and gender performance. Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, Vol. 45(4), p 453-474.

Humphrey, S. E. (2000).
Fraternities, athletic teams, and rape
. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Vol. 15, p10-13.

One In Four (2013). Sexual assault statistics. Retrieved from http://www.oneinfourusa.org/statistics.php

U.S. Department of Justice (2000). Sexual victimization of college women (DoJ Publication No. NCJ 182369. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Wechsler, H., Kuh, G., Davenport, A. E. (2009). Fraternities, sororities and binge drinking: Results from a national study of American colleges. Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, Vol. 46(3), p395-416.


Discussion
What do you believe creates a fraternity and sorority life that cultivates a community that is not conducive to sexual assault?
Criticism and Opportunity for Research
The majority of the data collected and used in current research on fraternities and sororities was collect 15-20 years ago. Updated data may yield a better picture of what specific issues are facing fraternity and sorority life today.
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