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The American Soldier

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by

Alexis Anatalio

on 4 December 2013

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Transcript of The American Soldier

The American Soldier
Written By Philip Freneau
He was born in New York and raised in New Jersey.

Philip graduated from Princeton University where his roommate was James Madison. Madison and Jefferson also encouraged Philip to establish the "
National Gazette,"
a newspaper company.

He was very influenced by the political situation of that time period where he eventually pursued his interests in writing. He became a journalist and poet.

Philip wrote a number of anit-British pieces and also about nature

Phil also earned the title of "the poet of the American Revolution."
Analysis
[A Picture from the Life] -
He is going try to give us an idea of how it was like to be a war veteran.


"To serve with love,
And shed your blood,
Approved may be above, -
This is an epigraph quote by Lord Oxford that says that although you may

But here below
be fighting for something good, there may also be some aspects
(Example shew,)
that come along with it that may be disadvantageous.
‘Tis dangerous to be good."

--Lord Oxford
(Analysis Continued...)
Far, far from domes where splendid tapers glare,
‘Tis his from dear bought peace no wealth to win,
Removed alike from courtly cringing ‘squires,
The great-man’s Levee, and the proud man’s grin.
January 2, 1752 – December 18, 1832
Deep in a vale, a stranger now to arms,
Too poor to shine in courts, too proud to beg,
He, who once warred on Saratoga’s plains,
Sits musing o’er his scars, and wooden leg.
The veteran who once fought in the Battle of Saratoga (hasn't held a gun for a long time) is now in poverty but he cannot beg because its too embarrassing. He is left with nothing but his battle scars and a wooden leg.
Remembering still the toil of former days,
To other hands he sees his earnings paid;--
They share the due reward—he feeds on praise.
Lost in the abyss of want, misfortune’s shade.
He still remembers the days of the Revolutionary War. Now, he is losing his earnings to other people as they enjoy their freedom and all he gets is praise for being a war veteran. He has a wretched life of poverty.
Although the American soldier was on the winning side of the war, he is in poverty unlike the British who are in their domes with bright candles lit in their Levees , or parties.
Sold are those arms which once on Britons blazed,
When, flushed with conquest, to the charge they came;
That power repelled, and Freedom’s fabrick raised,
She leaves her soldier—famine and a name!
When the british the troops came firing, the American soldiers fought back and repelled the British forces. America raised its flag of freedom but left the soldiers (who fought) to poverty and famine.
Theme
The American war veteran wasn't rewarded for his service and instead, he was left with poverty and a wretched life of misfortune.
"Too poor to shine in courts, too proud to beg..."
"...Sits musing o’er his scars, and wooden leg."
"...She leaves her soldier—famine and a name!"
"...Lost in the abyss of want, misfortune’s shade."
Support
A Picture from the Life
To serve with love,
And shed your blood,
Approved may be above,
But here below
(Example shew,)
‘Tis dangerous to be good.

--Lord Oxford

Deep in a vale, a stranger now to arms,
Too poor to shine in courts, too proud to beg,
He, who once warred on Saratoga’s plains,
Sits musing o’er his scars, and wooden leg.

Remembering still the toil of former days,
To other hands he sees his earnings paid;--
They share the due reward—he feeds on praise.
Lost in the abyss of want, misfortune’s shade.

Far, far from domes where splendid tapers glare,
‘Tis his from dear bought peace no wealth to win,
Removed alike from courtly cringing ‘squires,
The great-man’s Levee, and the proud man’s grin.

Sold are those arms which once on Britons blazed,
When, flushed with conquest, to the charge they came;
That power repelled, and Freedom’s fabrick raised,
She leaves her soldier—famine and a name!
By Philip Freneau
Full transcript