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Acting for Film

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by

Kady Le

on 18 October 2013

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Transcript of Acting for Film

ACTING FOR FILM
Icebreakers
Let's introduce ourselves!
ACTIVITY
With the people around you, discuss the following...
Have you had prior experience with acting (film or stage)? Do you prefer one over the other?
1.
3.
What do you think makes acting easy for some people and others?
5.
What does it mean to "get into character"?
Do you have techniques for getting into your role?
4.
What is the importance of voice and body to an actor?
How do actors convey emotion and character using just those two?
2.
Why are you here and you hope to gain from this workshop?
ACTING 101
ACTING FOR FILM
What did we just learn?
What they tell you in Drama 1
Stage Acting vs. Film Acting
Expressing emotion
Portraying a character, know 5Ws and H.
Sharing/telling a story
Getting audience to care
Working with an objective
1.
Loud volume and projection needed to reach the back row… the actor must reach the audience.
Use big gestures and facial expressions.
Transitioning from
STAGE to SCREEN
I really had no idea what to put.
Pitfalls of Stage Actors Moving to Film
1. Be careful not to overact. “Less is more” on film.
FILM ACTING
TECHNIQUES

Inner Monologue
Act with the eyes,
not the face.
Listen actively,
engage the eyes.
DISCUSSION
ACTIVITY
"Over There"
Know your character.
Create a back story
Figure out his/her objectives
Listen.
Don't just act, but react.
Always ask yourself "Why?"
Project your voice and enunciate your words.
Pay attention to detail.
Develop physical habits or mannerisms for your role. It truly immerses you in your character.
TIPS
People-walk. It sounds creepy but it's a great way to pick up mannerism for your character.
Improvise and roll with the punches.
It's okay to mess up. Just don't let the audience know.
5 Key Lessons from Michael Caine
1.
When speaking to an actor off-camera, look into one eye and stick with it.
2.
Film acting is, in large part, reacting and listening.
3.
4.
5.
While rehearsing something with a fellow actor, if a crew member can come up and recognize you’re rehearsing vs. having a real conversation, then you aren’t doing it right.
An actor relaxes in front of the camera by concentrating, and knowing that you have no enemies on set, everyone’s on your side and doing their best to make you look your best for the movie.
The camera catches everything you do, so don’t be afraid to play things subtley.
2.
3.
Using the stage through blocking.
4.
Focus is on performing and speaking.

1.
Speak in a normal voice since the microphone is right there… The camera comes to the actor.
2.
Be still. Acting with your eyes.
3.
Hitting your mark for the camera shot to work.
4.
Focus is on listening.
Don’t move around or use big gestures. You will move out of the camera shot. BE STILL.
2.
3.
Use regular volume.
4.
Not liking the way you look on film; camera image may be hard to accept
5.
Don’t act. Just be yourself.

1. So which is easier? Why?
Acting for film?
Acting for stage?
2. Which is "better" and why?
TOPICS
Film (and stage) actors need to carry on an inner monologue with themselves.

The camera stays on the actor’s face during filming, allowing the audience to see the actor’s thoughts clearly.
If an actor is thinking in character, his or her mind is active, and his or her thoughts are engaged.
It works the same way in life—when we are concerned, it shows on our face.

The acting is in the eye, which can become as large as eight feet wide on a big screen.

Imagine the emotions and thoughts flowing out from the eyes, keeping the face still.

In a close up, even a blink registers as a ten on the Richter scale. So there is a certain amount of stillness required in film acting, especially in a close up.

Listen with the eyes.

While listening is important in theatre acting, it’s even more crucial in film acting since there is less text. Theatre tells the story with words; film narrates with images.

How often is the camera on the person who is listening rather than the person who is speaking? Listening is interesting.

Listening and reacting in character is at the heart of effective screen acting.
Full transcript