Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

ASL vs PSE vs SEE

No description
by

Morgan Arnold

on 16 September 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of ASL vs PSE vs SEE

ASL, PSE, & SEE
American Sign Language (ASL)
The primary sign language used by deaf and hearing-impaired people in the United States and Canada
Pidgin Signed English (PSE)
A combination of American Sign Language (ASL) and English.
Signed Exact English (SEE)
A system of manual communication that strives to be an exact representation of English vocabulary and grammar.
Pros:
Common language of the cultural Deaf community, and deaf children who learn ASL have easy access to that Deaf community
Proponents claim a solid foundation in one language (ASL) gives them a good basis for learning a second language (English).
Students using ASL can be mainstreamed with use of interpreter
Cons:
Deaf children who can communicate only with ASL limited to using interpreters, communicating with hand-written notes or computer-based translators when dealing with the general population who do not know ASL
Many parents of ASL-signing children never become proficient enough themselves with ASL to be able to communicate with their own child using ASL
Physically hard-of-hearing children placed in ASL-based programs run the risk of becoming functionally deaf
While ASL fluency is increasing in the USA, still relatively few people know ASL
Pros:
Widely used in public schools
Talking while signing is possible
Pros:
Children who have learned english can easily transfer the sentence structure
Widely used in public schools
Cons:
Very few people know signed exact english
Never learn all of the signs
Cons:
It can be hard to sign and talk
Challenge to children who do not know English.
Mixture of ASL and English so could be difficult
Full transcript