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Do bryophytes have true leaves, stems, and roots?

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Tracy Cantwell

on 14 May 2014

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Transcript of Do bryophytes have true leaves, stems, and roots?

Does Bryophyta produce seeds?
Because Bryophyta do not produce flowers or fruit, it does not produce any seeds.
Do bryophytes have true leaves, stems, and roots?
Vascular Tissue—a network of thick-walled cells joined into narrow tubes that extend throughout the plant body

The Dominant Bryophyta Generation
The most dominant stage in the bryophyte life cycle is the haploid stage.

When did they evolve?
Fossil records of Byrophytes are poor, making it difficult to determine when they evolved.

Common Examples:
Do they produce flowers?
Bryophyta does not produce any flowers.

Common Examples:
NONVASCULAR PLANTS

-Division: Bryophyta

-Common Name: Mosses, Liverworts, and Hornworts

-Characteristics: Small, nonvascular, anchored by rhizoids, gametophyte dominant, flagellated sperm require water to reach egg, mostly moist habitats

-Bryophyta: classes Musci (mosses) and Hepaticae (liverworts)

Division Bryophyta
Bryophytes don’t have vascular tissue. Therefore, they don’t have true leaves, stems, and roots.
In the haploid stage a multicellular haploid gametophyte develops from a spore and produces haploid gametes.
The bryophyta spread through spores.
Instead of using flowers to make seeds, mosses release spores from their leaves.

Water is an essential vector to sexual reproduction.

They usually grow in mid- to late- successional forests very low to the ground with shade. Thus, making it easier to reproduce.

Bryophyta is the Plant Division that contains mosses. Plants in this Division have crude stems and leaves, but no roots. Instead of roots, they have "rhizoids." Rhizoids help anchor the plant to a surface, but they do not absorb nutrients like roots on other plants do. Instead of using flowers to make seeds, mosses release spores from their leaves. Spores can travel by water and make new mosses in new locations. Water is very important to mosses, so they can grow and spread; however, mosses can survive even when they dry out. When they become wet again, they revive and continue growing

Botanically, mosses are non-vascular plants in the land plant division Bryophyta. They are small (a few centimeters tall) herbaceous (non-woody) plants that absorb water and nutrients mainly through their leaves and harvest carbon dioxide and sunlight to create food by photosynthesis.[3][4] They differ from vascular plants in lacking water-bearing xylem tracheids or vessels. As in liverworts and hornworts, the haploid gametophyte generation is the dominant phase of the life cycle. This contrasts with the pattern in all vascular plants (seed plants and pteridophytes), where the diploid sporophyte generation is dominant. Mosses reproduce using spores, not seeds and have no flowers.

-The division Bryophyta has been divided into three classes namely:

Hepaticae
- Commonly called Liverworts.

Anthocerotae
- Commonly called Hornworts

Bryophytes
- Commonly called Mosses

Byrophytes are said to have existed 488 million to 444 million years ago.

First traces were found in Argentinian rocks that dated from the Ordovician Period.

Bryophyta is the Plant Division that contains mosses. Plants in this Division have crude stems and leaves, but no roots. Instead of roots, they have "rhizoids." Rhizoids help anchor the plant to a surface, but they do not absorb nutrients like roots on other plants do. Instead of using flowers to make seeds, mosses release spores from their leaves. Spores can travel by water and make new mosses in new locations. Water is very important to mosses, so they can grow and spread; however, mosses can survive even when they dry out. When they become wet again, they revive and continue growing

Common Examples:
What size are bryophytes?
Bryophytes are small herbaceous plants that grow closely packed together in mats, cushion on rocks, soil, tree trunks and leaves of forest trees.

There 12000 species of moss

They are relatively small compared to most seed bearing plants, most are about 2cm to 5cm tall, If stretch out generally less than 10cm long.
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