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Idioms! -

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by

Nour A. Bozo

on 22 September 2013

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Transcript of Idioms! -

Idioms! -
Figurative Language Continued...

More Idioms:
"A chip on your shoulder" - means you think you know a lot
"Sick as a dog" - means you are very ill
"Break a leg" - means "Good luck!"
"Don't bite more than you can chew" - means don't overwork yourself

http://languagearts.pppst.com/idioms.html

http://voxy.om/blog/index.php/2012/02/top-10-most-common-idioms-in-english/
Idioms Around the Globe:
There are certain things that happen in every culture and there are idioms to deal with them:

In Norwegian and Czech, “walking around hot porridge” refers to beating around the bush, which is also an idiom meaning not getting to the point.

-If you are in Italy or Turkey and you say you are “as hungry as a wolf” then you are starving.

-If it is raining in large amounts, most cultures have an interesting way of saying that:

-In English, it would be “raining cats and dogs”

-In Africa, they might say “it's raining old women with clubs”

-Many languages refer to heavy rain as coming in buckets or as rain coming out of a bucket.

For Example:
Common idioms that refer to people include:

"A piece of cake"- means task was easy

"Costs an arm and a leg"- means item was too expensive

"When pigs fly" - means it's not going to happen


Well, What Is An Idiom???
An idiom is a word or phrase that is not meant to be taken literally.


Comprehension Check: BTW, "literally" means "word for word."
Conclusion:
"Just For The Record"
Idioms are a figure of speech, not to be taken literally, by which describe a situation.

Note: "For the record" is an idiom that means the person is saying it so that people know but do not necessarily agree with or support it. It may go on file, but not an actual record like the one on this screen.
Some Idioms Use Color Words To Convey Other Meanings:
For example, there are several that use the word “blue:”

-“The blues” can refer to both a style of music and feeling sad.
-If something occurs rarely, it is said to happen “once in a blue moon”, because a blue moon is two full moons in one month, which doesn’t happen often.
-“Out of the blue” means something happens that was unexpected.
After watching this video, with your group, brainstorm possible idioms that match the story line.

Finally....
Friendly Advice:
Don't call your kid brother or sister "an idiom." They will tell on you, anyway.

Have a nice day!
Checking
For
Understanding
Directions: Turn to a partner and come up with 10 idioms and explain their meanings.
Ex. "Hit the road" is an idiom for the meaning "get out of here" or "we/you really have to go now."
Full transcript