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Seaborgium

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by

Daniel Pearson

on 6 September 2013

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Transcript of Seaborgium

A Little History
Seaborgium is a synthetic element not found in nature or present in the environment at all. Elements such as seaborgium can be created artificially in particle accelerators, the first report of the element came in 1974 from the Soviet Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and were followed later by others from Berkeley in California, USA.
Basic Information
Name:
Seaborgium
Symbol:
Sg
Atomic

Number:
106
Atomic

Weight:
[266 u (atomic mass units)]
Standard

State:
Presumably a solid
at 298 kelvins (76.73 Fahrenheit)
Number of Protons/Electrons:
106
Number of Neutrons:
157
Group

In

Periodic

Table:
6
Period

in

Periodic

Table:
7
Color:
unknown, but probably metallic
and silvery white or grey in appearance.
Classification:
Metallic
Physical and Chemical Properties
Physical:
There is no data on the melting and boiling points of Seaborgium. The density of the solid though is 23200 (predicted) 1kilogram/cubic meter.

Chemical:
a transuranium element, meaning it is unstable and decays radioactively into other elements. All elements greater than 92 (uranium) own these properties.
More Information
There are no current uses for seaborgium. The only relationship between the element and humans, if even, is simply filling in the space of 106 on the periodic table. Only very small amounts of it have ever been made, and isolation of an observable quantity of seaborgium has never been achieved.

Element 106 is named after Glenn T. Seaborg, who discovered many of the transuranium elements. Because of his many achievements, he was awarded a Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
Seaborgium
By: Daniel Pearson, Mr. Levrault's 6th hour Chemistry
Glenn T. Seaborg
Sources
http://www.webelements.com/seaborgium/
http://www.chemicalelements.com/elements/sg.html

Thank you!
Full transcript