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Iris Greek Goddess of Rainbows

6th grade greek project
by

Alex Sung

on 25 May 2013

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Transcript of Iris Greek Goddess of Rainbows

Iris The Goddess of Rainbows IRIS was the goddess of the rainbow, the messenger of the Olympian gods. She was often represented as the handmaiden and personal messenger of Hera. Iris was a goddess of sea and sky--her father Thaumas "the wondrous" was a marine-god. So the goddess was believed to replenish the rain-clouds with water from the sea. Iris had no distinctive mythology of her own. In myth she appears only as an errand-running messenger and was usually described as a virgin goddess. Iris appears in ancient Greek vase painting as a beautiful young woman with golden wings, a herald's rod , and sometimes a water-pitcher in her hand. In the Homeric poems she appears as the minister of the Olympian gods. She carries messages from Ida to Olympus, from gods to gods, and from gods to men. Iris does not appear as the goddess of the rainbow, but the rainbow itself is called iris. Citations

Atsma, Aaron. "Iris." IRIS : Greek Goddess of the Rainbows. Theoi Project, n.d. Web. 9 May 2012. <http://www.theoi.com/Pontios/Iris.html>. Document: Citations Documents:

Hamilton, Edith. "IRIS." Iris -- Goddess of the Rainbow. Brown and Company, n.d. Web. 9 May 2012. <http://orderwhitemoon.org/goddess/Iris2/>. She was usually depicted standing beside Zeus or Hera, sometimes serving nectar from her jug. As cup-bearer of the gods Iris is often indistinguishable from Hebe in art. Her mother Elektra "the amber" a cloud-nymph. For the coastal-dwelling Greeks, the rainbow's arc was most often seen spanning the distance beteween cloud and sea. This brilliant phenomenon in tile skies, which vanishes as quickly as it appears, was regarded as the swift minister of the gods. Iris's Family Tree Photo Citations:

Iris 1:
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://n.nshrine.com/1955/iconurl.jpg&imgrefurl=http://nshrine.com/shrine/Iris&usg=__lYC6tKWaOcTeZVnR2YSHqwm1Vus=&h=1421&w=1069&sz=401&hl=en&start=2&zoom=1&tbnid=ucJ0GCO4TlyhPM:&tbnh=150&tbnw=113&ei=e9-rT4rKB4Segwfd0ajgDw&prev=/search%3Fq%3Diris%2Bthe%2Bgreek%2Bgoddess%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Dactive%26gbv%3D2%26tbm%3Disch&itbs=1

Iris 2:
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://n.nshrine.com/1955/iconurl.jpg&imgrefurl=http://nshrine.com/shrine/Iris&usg=__lYC6tKWaOcTeZVnR2YSHqwm1Vus=&h=1421&w=1069&sz=401&hl=en&start=2&zoom=1&tbnid=ucJ0GCO4TlyhPM:&tbnh=150&tbnw=113&ei=e9-rT4rKB4Segwfd0ajgDw&prev=/search%3Fq%3Diris%2Bthe%2Bgreek%2Bgoddess%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Dactive%26gbv%3D2%26tbm%3Disch&itbs=1

Iris 3:
http://jlelanddavis.blogspot.com/2010/11/greek-gods-ii.html

Iris's Family Tree:
http://meadhall.homestead.com/aboutmyth.html By: Alex Sung I Hope Enjoyed My Prezi-tation!
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