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Patrick Combs

on 6 November 2013

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Transcript of Crystalization

Different Types of Crystals
Crystals in Nature
Crystals in Technology
Mr. Combs' sl
What is a Crystal?
How do Crystals Form?

There are four different types of crystals, covalent, metallic, ionic and molecular. They are categorized by their physical and chemical properties.
Covalent Crystals
This is a crystal which has real chemical covalent between all of the atoms in the crystal. So really a single crystal of a covalent crystals is really just one big molecule. An example of this is a crystal like diamond or zinc sulfide. Covalent crystals can have extremely high melting points.
Ionic Crystals
This is a crystal where the individual atoms don't have covalent bonds between them, but are held together by electrostatic forces. An example of this type of crystal is sodium chloride (NaCl). Ionic crystals are hard and have relatively high melting points.
Molecular Crystals
This is a crystal where there are recognizable molecules in the structure and the crystal is held together by non-covalent interactions like van der Waals forces or hydrogen bonding. An example of this type of crystal would be sugar. Molecular crystals tend to be soft and have lower melting points.
Metallic Crystals
Individual metal atoms sit on lattice sites while the outer electrons from these atoms are able to flow freely around the lattice. Metallic crystals normally have high melting points and densities.
Full transcript