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The Punic Wars

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Gina Root

on 13 March 2013

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Transcript of The Punic Wars

The Third Punic War Ancient Carthage Roman Republic The First Punic War The Second Punic War Battle of Carthage (end of the Punic Wars) (Final Battle): 17,000 killed The Second Punic War Battle of the Trebia: Approximately 26,000-28,000, up to 32,000 total casualties Carthage lost 500 ships with an unknown number crew deaths. Battle of the Trebia: 4-5,000 Infantry, Some Elephants Battle of Carthage: 445,000 killed (out of 500,000 defending troops) The Punic Wars Reasons for Roman Involvement Casualties and Deaths 1. Rome interfered in a dispute on the Carthaginian-controlled island of Sicily


2. Rome attacked/invaded by new leader of Carthage


3. Elders of the Roman Senate tried to convince government that Carthage was still a threat to Roman supremacy. The First Punic War Rome lost 700 ships (in part to bad weather) with an unknown number crew deaths. Rome lost about 50,000 citizens during this conflict according to a census in the 3rd century - noted by Adrian Goldsworthy There has been no solid number of noted casualties from the Carthage side Reasons for Carthage involvement Battle of the Metaurus: 2,000 killed Battle of Ilipa: approx. 7,000 killed Battle of Baecula: 2,000 killed Battle of Zama: 2,500 killed Battle of the Metaurus: 10,000 killed Battle of Ilipa: 54,500 men and 32+ Elephants Battle of Baecula: 6,000 killed Battle of Zama: 20,000 killed 1. Rome broke various treaties by becoming involved in the dispute within a Carthaginian province.


2. Since Rome won the first war, the successor of Carthaginian general Hamilcar, Hannibal, was forced to take a blood oath against Rome.

3. Carthage technically broke another treaty with Rome by declaring war against Numidia. 264 - 146 B.C. The Gladius The Corvus Latin for "The Raven"

A military boarding device

System of pulleys below deck to raise and lower the Corvus.

Heavy spike shaped like a bird beak Second Punic War ----- Scipio Africanus

Primarily for stabbing

- Longer weapons not as useful because of lack of room

-easily thrust into vulnerable areas (groin, neck). Became Roman weapon of choice The Third Punic War Rome rises as the
winner in these
wars Prisoners of War ~The estimated amount of Carthaginians who were enslaved/captured during these wars is 50,000 + Prisoners of War According to most sources,
there were almost no POW's
on the roman republic side, but there is not enough documented information to prove this either way ~All were Men, women
and children Scientific Advances Ow! The Roman Republic side lost 300,000 + soldiers
in this war Overall * Please note that these are only some of the battles within this war (there were many more), and these numbers do not add up to the overall amount Overall The Carthage side of this war lost 316,000 + Troops * Please note that these are only some of the battles within this war (there was many more) and these numbers do not add up to the overall amount Overall in every single war:
The Roman Republic side lost
AT LEAST 317,000 + troops Total Amount Total Amount Overall in every single war:
The Carthage side lost
at least 600,000+ troops and civilians and
elephants combined Works Cited

"First Punic War." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 23 Nov. 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Punic_War>.

"Corvus (boarding Device)." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 13 Oct. 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corvus_%28weapon%29>.

"Second Punic War." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 26 Nov. 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Punic_War>.

"Third Punic War." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 24 Nov. 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Punic_War>.

"List of Battles by Casualties." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 23 Nov. 2012. Web. 27 Nov. 2012

<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_battles_by_casualties>.
"Punic Wars: Carthage and Rome in War and Peace." Punic Wars: Carthage and Rome in War and Peace. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Nov. 2012. <http://www.phoenician.org/punic_wars_and_peace.html Fin "Roman Weapons." Roman Weapons. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Nov. 2012. <http://www.ancientmilitary.com/roman-weapons.htm>.
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