Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Persuasive Techniques for Poetry Speech

Techniques to use for Persuasive writing and speaking. Suitable for highschool students
by

Zoey Grills

on 28 April 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Persuasive Techniques for Poetry Speech

Rhetorical Questions
Rhetorical questions work in two ways - either the answer is so obvious that it cannot be disagreed with (loaded question); or the question leads the listener to the next element of your argument.

Alliteration
A series of words starting with the same letter.
Draws attention to the phrase and helps it to stick in the reader's/listener's mind.
Exaggeration (hyperbole)
Makes the issue seem more important or urgent than it may otherwise be considered. Exaggerating the scale of an issue can provoke and/or draw an emotional response from a listener.


Persuasive Techniques
-Poetry Speech Yr 9

example...

This is a poem that everyone will fall in love with.


The alliteration will be stuck in your mind for weeks.
examples
Who wouldn't be able to picture this in their mind?

Why is it that teenagers don't read poetry?



examples
Teenagers today are more interested in socialising with school friends on Snapchat than reading poetry.

Simile
A simile is a  comparison between two different things. It is a device that helps to explain things (an object, event, process, etc.) to the listener.

The rhythm will rattle around in your head like a marble in a piggy bank.

examples
Repetition – RULE OF THREE
Three is the most effective number for repetition. It is often called ‘the rule of three’ because three is the smallest number of elements required to create a pattern. The ‘rule of three’ makes writing more memorable. More memorable = more persuasive!

examples...
This poem uses simile, metaphor and alliteration.

The description of the cake allows readers to see, smell and taste it.
EXPERT OPINION
To make a speaker's position seem more credible, they may quote the opinions of experts or authority figures that correspond with their own.

examples...
Edgar Allan Poe describs poetry as "the rhythmical creation of Beauty."

ANECDOTES
Connect with your audience to give them a relateable story. Be careful, because anecdotes are not always as persuasive as facts.

e.g. I can tell you that, as a single father of two, I received very little in the way of financial support from Centrelink during my attempts to return to fulltime work.

Statistics and facts
Facts and statistics can be used to make an argument seem more conclusive, a speaker's opinion more valid. They can be twisted, so try to stay legit.

A recent survey found that 90% of students favoured no school uniforms at all.

USE OF 2ND PERSON
2nd person – use of the word “you” – may be effective as it directly addresses the listener and involves them in the issue.

e.g You must read this poem.



EMOTIVE LANGUAGE
A speaker will carefully choose language which is designed to create an emotional response for the audience (sadness, guilt, happiness, enthusiasm, excitement, anger…)

This inspirational poem will help you live a better life with healthier relationships.

The tragic grief of an unfair experience sparked the poet to write this incredibly dark and gloomy work

IMAGERY
Stretch out on the cool grass, under a big oak tree on a warm Summer's day with your favourite poem.



The speaker may use language or terminology related to a particular topic. The use of this terminology will add to the credibility and persuasive effect of the article. Be careful not to alienate the audience.

For example...
Poet
Alliteration
Simile
Metaphor
Imagery
Personification
Onomatopoeia
Assonance
Meter
Repetition
Rhyme
Stanza

IMPERATIVES
Imperatives are statements which contain a high degree of certainty or forcefulness. For example, “must” has a higher degree of forcefulness than “should”.

example...
You should probably read this poem.
You might like it.
vs

You must read this poem.
You will love it.
SUBJECT SPECIFIC LANGUAGE
Full transcript