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ELLB4: Writing A Band Six Commentary

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by

Paul Hanson

on 3 December 2014

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Transcript of ELLB4: Writing A Band Six Commentary

ELLB4: Band Six Commentaries
What are the four main aspects of the commentary that you need to cover? Clue: these are the four different sections on the mark scheme.
Answers
The four main aspects of the commentary are:
the
discourses
(purposes, contexts, audiences, forms/genres, structures and themes) of the source and the new text
your
analytical comments
on your changes to the source
Understanding of
linguistic choices
and appropriately used
terminology
good
range
of comment
Shakespeare's Style
Linguistic:
archaic to the modern reader (lexically and syntactically)
Juliet's language converges with Romeo's
Elision and omission to aid metre and synthesise 'talk in life'
turn-taking
length of turn
a wide variety of grammatical constructions
pre-modification (e.g. epithets)
Shakespeare's Style
Literary (language):
metaphor and extended metaphor
simile
biblical and classical allusions
contrast and oxymoron
sound patterning
wordplay
Shakespeare's Style
Formal
/
structural
:
free verse for high status ch.
prose for low status ch.
sonnets for R&J
alternating from comedy to romance to action and tragedy and back again
rhyming couplets for transitions and key moments
characters finishing each other's couplets
asides and soliloquies
antithesis
foreshadowing
dramatic irony
Discourses
Purposes
: what was the purpose of R&J' and of your new text?
Audience
: who were the intended audience of R&J' and of your new text? How did Sh. and you achieve your intended effects?
Context
: what do you know about the contextual factors influencing Shakespeare? And, you?
Form/genre
: what form did Shakespeare employ? And, you? And, why for both?
Themes
: what are the key themes of both texts?
Self-review
Which aspects of Shakespeare's style did you emulate?

Guide your partner through your writing.
Exemplars
Let's look at a couple of sections from some very successful commentaries.
Discourses
You are going to write the opening paragraph of the commentary, including your comments on the following for both the source and the new text:
the purposes
the audiences
the contexts
the forms
the themes

First, you have some thinking, planning time and then you are going to explain your writing to your partner.
Green Pen Marking
Swap with your partner and then underline the strengths with regards the following:
the purposes
the audiences
the contexts
the forms
the themes

Make a note of any omissions.
Style
Pick an aspect of style (linguistic, literary, formal or structural) and now write one section commenting on the sources and the new text.

Green Pen Marking
Swap with your partner and then underline the strengths with regards the following:
range and quality of comment (choices and effects) made
the use of evidence from both texts
appropriate terminology

Make a note of any omissions.
Full transcript