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Women of The Civil War

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kaitlin riley

on 13 February 2014

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Transcript of Women of The Civil War

1865
1861
Women of The Civil War
What was The Civil War?
The Civil War was a fight between the Northern (Union) and Southern(Confederate) United States. This war was fought because The North wanted to preserve the Union and emancipate the slaves; and the south wanted to keep slavery and protect homes and family.

Women of The Civil War
Before war came a woman's only role in society was to create a home for her and her family, but when war approached women were suddenly looked at quite differently, as The Civil War marks the first time that women were known to play an active role in society.
A Woman's Role in The Civil War
Women had many roles that involved them in The Civil War, some of these roles took place at home, at a separate meeting location, or on the actual battle field.
Nurses
As The Civil War started recruiting soldiers, they also started to get women to sign up at nurses.
African American Women
Women Soldiers
Women were not legally suppose to be fighting in the war, but it is now know that many women did participate by changing their names to ones more masculine, and disguising themselves as men.

Most women were discovered as a casualty or when they were injured and needed medical attention.
Spies
The first nurses of The Civil War were men, but as the war started army leaders discovered that they did not have enough nurses and decided to start recruiting women to be nurses on the battle field.
The First Nurses
Menial Tasks
Frances Clayton
By Kaitlin Riley
Clara Barton
Clara Barton was a famous nurse that served in the Civil war and is know in regards to The Red Cross. Barton first introduced the The Red Cross to The U.S. when she traveled to Europe where The Red Cross officially started. When she returned from England with The Red Cross they helped the injured soldiers recover, and Clara was later named “Angel of the Battle Field.”
Women often played a vital role in the process of gaining valuable knowledge about the opposing sides attack plans by spying.

Women would host a party and invite either the Union or the Confederate soldiers, depending on what information they needed to get, they would then go around and socialize with the soldiers and receive information about their attack plans and anything else they needed to get.

They would also receive information by flirting the soldiers around town.
Free African American women played some of the same roles as White women did, with some exceptions of their duties being more strenuous.
Free African American (Black) Women served in The Civil War as nurses, but most of the time they were only allowed to tend to the injured black soldiers, or the patients that were sevearly ill.
Nurse
Free Black women were also subjected to preforming menial tasks like cooking for soldiers and doing laundry.
Soldiers
Like many other women, Black women also server as disguised soldiers, or they would stand by the sides of their husbands in war and act as if she was his nurse or launderer.
Enslaved Women
Women in the south that were still enslaved had to execute their daily duties on the plantations, and they also had to fulfill the duties of the enslaved men that were out at war.
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