Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Constructive and Deconstructive Forces

No description
by

Nicole Swartzendruber

on 17 October 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Constructive and Deconstructive Forces

The process of
constructive and
destructive forces
are never ending
DATE: 10-16-13
CREATED BY: Wyatt and Nicole
TEAM: Team Constructo&Deconstructo
Destructive Forces!!!
A force in Earth's crust that destroys or breaks down the land.
Comparison
One example of a constructive and destructive force is a volcano. Volcanoes build up the land when they erupt, but they also destroy houses and other things when the lava melts and burns these objects.
More Contrasting!!!!
Tectonic Plates Vs. Earthquakes
Earthquakes
Destructive Force
Tectonic Plates
Constructive Force!!
Glaciers
Glaciers are a destructive force because they can tear down anything in their path and pick up soil and other sediment as the rolls down a hill, BUT they can also constructive, because they can also deposition when they melt and could build up new landforms.
Animal Impact Vs. Running Water
Running Water.
Destructive and constructive force, because it can weather the land and also erode it, but it can also deposit the sediment, which will build up the land, which is constructive.
Animal Impact
Destructive force, because they dig holes and the land could collapse and destroy the land.
Questions!?!?!?!
Tornado
Wind
Can hollow out areas or breaks down rock, so it is a destructive force. It is also a constructive force because it can build things up like sand dunes.
Is a tsunami a constructive force, destructive force, or both?
YES!
YES!
YES!
NO!
NO!
NO!
WHAT NOW?
More Questions?!?!?!?!?!?!?!
What is a Constructive/Destructive Force?
Are earthquakes a destructive or constructive force or both?
DO CONSTRUCTIVE AND DESTRUCTIVE FORCES STOP AFTER ONE CYCLE?
Contrasting!!
Tsunami
When the giant wave goes over the soil, it scrapes the seafloor sediment and carries it with it until it gets to the shore and the wave crashes, leaving this sediment here. It also can destroy homes, which makes it a destructive force as well.
RiVeR
Rivers can build and destroy the land. The destructive part of this is that the river picks up the sediment and erodes the bottom of the river and then the constructive force part of it is that the river moves the water to a new location and leaves the sediment there.
OcEaN
Both a constructive and destructive force, because it can pull sediment from the ocean floor which is the destructive force and when it is deposited somewhere else and it builds up the land, which is a constructive force.
Constructive Forces!!!
A force that builds up Earth's crust by adding to the crust.

Constructive and Destructive Forces
More comparisons!! :)
Deposition
Tornadoes are an example of destructive force. Deposition is an example of a constructive force.
T
h
e

E
n
d

A constructive force is a force that builds up Earth's crust.
A destructive force is a force that tears down or destroys Earth's crust.
A DESTRUCTIVE FORCE
NOOOOO!!!!!! THEY ARE NEVER ENDING!!!!!!
Full transcript