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Disaster Management

Tsunami
by

Kichu menon

on 15 September 2013

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Transcript of Disaster Management

Disaster Management:
What Is A Disaster??
=A disaster is a natural or man-made (or technological) hazard resulting in an event of substantial extent causing significant physical damage or destruction, loss of life, or drastic change to the environment.
=A disaster can be ostensively defined as any tragic event stemming from events such as earthquakes, floods, catastrophic accidents, fires, or explosions.
=It is a phenomenon that can cause damage to life and property and destroy the economic, social and cultural life of people.
Tsunami
A tsunami is a series of water waves caused by the displacement of a large volume of a body of water, generally an ocean or a large lake. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.
Causes
Disaster management
(Disaster management) is the discipline of dealing with and avoiding both natural and manmade disasters.
=It involves preparedness, response and recovery in order to lessen the impact of disasters. It may also involve preparedness training by private citizens.
=All aspects of emergency management deal with the processes used to protect populations or organizations from the consequences of disasters, wars and acts of terrorism.
=Emergency management doesn't necessarily avert or eliminate the threats themselves, although the study and prediction of the threats is an important part of the field. The basic level of emergency management are the various kinds of search and rescue activity.
Tsunami waves do not resemble normal sea waves, because their wavelength is far longer. Rather than appearing as a breaking wave, a tsunami may instead initially resemble a rapidly rising tide, and for this reason they are often referred to as tidal waves. Tsunamis generally consist of a series of waves with periods ranging from minutes to hours, arriving in a so-called "wave train". Wave heights of tens of metres can be generated by large events. Although the impact of tsunamis is limited to coastal areas, their destructive power can be enormous and they can affect entire ocean basins; the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was among the deadliest natural disasters in human history with over 230,000 people killed in 14 countries bordering the Indian Ocean.
Tsunamis, also called seismic sea waves or, incorrectly, tidal waves,
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generally are caused by earthquakes,
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less commonly by submarine landslides,
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infrequently by submarine volcanic eruptions and
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very rarely by a large meteorite impact in the ocean.
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Submarine volcanic eruptions have the potential to produce truly awesome tsunami waves.
THANK YOU AND HAVE A
NICE DAY

3. Steering: Water can be steered to strategically placed angled walls, ditches and paved roads. Theoretically, porous dikes can reduce the impact of violent waves.

2. Slow Water: Forests, ditches, slopes, or berms can slow down waves and filter out debris. The success of this method depends on correctly estimating the force of the tsunami.

1. Avoid Inundation Areas: Site Buildings or infrastructure away from hazard area or locate on a high point.

PREVENTION
Traditional houses in many South Asian countries are lifted up on stilts, though the intention has more to do with regional flooding and preventing animal infestations. Areas that rarely are flooded have little practical reason for stilt buildings unless it answers other design considerations. California apartments, for example, are sometimes placed above car garages. This conveniently keeps occupants safe from possible floods.
Tsunami In Japan
Japan was hit by a giant earthquake on March 11,2011, that triggered a deadly 23-foot tsunami in the country's north.
The magnitude of this earthquake was 8.9
Three nuclear
reactors were destroyed in this tsunami.
The economy of japan took a deep dip in this tsunami
Japan also has an early warning system (with regular drills) so that if a big earthquake occurs, they examine whether or not it might cause a tsunami, and if they think it will, they alert the population within minutes of the earthquake occurring.
Also they have an extensive system of coastal barriers so that when high waves come, they are prevented from coming to where people are living.
The Philippine Plate was being subducted below the North American Plate, at an angle of about 15 degrees. This resulted in an earthquake of moment magnitude nine and a rupture of a fault roughly parallel to the east coast of Japan over several hundred kilometres.
PREVENTION
Troughs and Barriers
Troughs and walls both on shore and in the ocean will help absorb the force of the wave, and bounce part of that wave back. The wave will pound against the wall with great friction. Islands with barrier reefs are comparatively safe from tsunamis for this reason.
Underwater explosion

Waves that approach each other from opposite directions in phase eliminate forces of one another. An underwater explosion or some kind of other movement away from shore would create waves that pound into the tsunami wave and cancel some of its force. Unfortunately, it would have to be a large explosion or shifting object to make a significant difference.After the water reaches shore there is little to be done. Most importantly, people need to get to high ground!
Raise levels of hoses

Traditional houses in many South Asian countries are lifted up on stilts, though the intention has more to do with regional flooding and preventing animal infestations. Areas that rarely are flooded have little practical reason for stilt buildings unless it answers other design considerations. California apartments, for example, are sometimes placed above car garages. This conveniently keeps occupants safe from possible floods.
Protect escape routes

Escape roads should be located around barrier that slow down water and away from water channels. These roads must not be straight lines that the water can use as channels. My illustration here is not the best because if water reaches these roads it will flow straight up them.This example directs the water into channels, drainage creeks, where it flows safely inland. Tough barriers at the tips of the wedges, or maybe just berms, help divert water. Off-shore barriers help direct water away before it even reaches these wedges. Evacuation routes are safely protected inside these wedges.
Group Members:-
Gautam - Tsunami (Capt)
Amit - Disaster management
Sakkeeb - What is disaster
Farhaan - Causes
Faizan - Prevention
Neeraj - Prevention
Krishna - Japan tsunami (Prezi)
Allen - Japan tsunami prevention (Prezi)
Learning Objective:-
What is a disaster?
How it can be managed?
Tsunami
Causes
Prevention
Japan Tsunami
Full transcript