Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Sika Deer

No description
by

Lily Zaspel

on 27 April 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Sika Deer

By Lily Zaspel and Cassie Teece
Characteristics:
The Sika Deer is brown or tan and becomes grey in the winter.
They have white spots and a black stripe down their backs
Adult males have their antlers pointed forward
They range from about 70-90 pounds
They breed in late fall or early winter around late September, and then the calves are born in May
Usually give birth to one calf but twins and even triplets are common.
Location:
The deer originated in Japan, Taiwan, and Eastern Asia
They were introduced to the U.S. in the 1900's when six of them were released onto James Island
Now they are found in Texas, Virginia, and the Eastern shore of Maryland
How are they controlled?
The Sika deer are being managed by legalized hunting with proper permits from wildlife authorities and local parks
The Sika Deer cause significant damage to vegetation natural and commercial.
The deer have become more of a problem because they occupy a similar niche as the whitetail deer and the red deer
Because the deer have similar ecological niches, the deer hybridize, which causes the gene pool to be less diverse
Cervus nippon: Sika Deer
`
Invasive Species:
Habitat:
Sika deer prefer habitats that have an abundance of vegetation for feeding as well as forests for shelter
Today they live in the piney forests in Texas as well as marshlands and forested wetlands.
Sources:
http://www.tsusinvasives.org/home/database/cervus-nippon



http://www.dnr.state.md.us/naturalresource/summer2003/sika.html
Full transcript