Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Translating Tolstoy

No description
by

Rebecca Dix

on 30 September 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Translating Tolstoy

Translating Tolstoy
Russian Proverb:
Вашими уста́ми, да мёд пить.
Literal Russian Translation:
I'd like to drink honey with your lips.
English Equivalent:
It is too good to be true.
Russian Proverb:
Христо́с терпе́л и нам веле́л.
Literal Russian Translation:
Christ endured and told us to.
English Equivalent:
Man was born to trouble.
Russian Proverb:
Держи карман шире!
Literal Russian Translation:
Hold your pocket open wider!
English Equivalent:
Don't try to bite off more than you can chew!

Russian Proverb:
При царе́ Горо́хе.
Literal Russian Translation:
In the times of czar Gorokh (czar from fairy tales).
English Equivalent:
Since Adam was a boy.
Louise and Aylmer Maude (1918):
ALL happy families resemble one another, each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.
Everything was upset in the Oblonskys’ house. The wife had discovered
an intrigue
between her husband and their former French governess, and declared that she would not continue to live under the same roof with him.
Louise and Aylmer Maude (1918):
Constance Garnett (1917):
"So most English-speaking readers glimpse Homer through the filter of Fitzgerald or Fagles, Dante through Sinclair or Singleton or the Hollanders, Proust through Moncrieff or Davis, García Márquez through Gregory Rabassa—and nearly every Russian through Constance Garnett. " - New Yorker
-Russia's voice or Garnett's voice?
English version:
"It was a lousy book, but this Blanchard guy was pretty good. He had this big chateau and all in the Riviera, in Europe, and all he did in his spare time was beat women off with a club.
He was a real rake and all, but he knocked women out.
" - J. D. Salinger, Catcher in the Rye

Russian Translation:
"He had a massive castle in the Riviera, in Europe, and in his free time for the most part he flogged some dames with a stick.
Over all he was courageous and all that, but he’d beat women until they lost consciousness.
" - Rita Rait-Kovaleva, Over the Abyss in Rye
Tolstoy's Writing Style
Russian Translations of American Literature
Pevear & Volokhonsky
"Richard is a native speaker of English. I'm a native speaker of Russian. My task is to explain to Richard what is happening in the Russian text. Then it is up to him to do what he can. The final word is always his. I can say this is not quite what the Russian says." - Ms. Volokhonsky
-Collaboration
-Restored aspects of Tolstoy's writing style, which were lost in earlier translations.
-
Clearly and precisely
recreates emotions and experiences.
-
Clumsy syntax
--willing to ignore grammatical rules, mostly relating to word order, to mimic verbal speech.
-Uses a
variety of idioms
-
Intentionally repeats words and phrases
to suggest moral and unique qualities in his characters.
Discussion Questions
1. How does Tolstoy use repetition to signify changes that have taken place in Anna’s personality?

2. Translators can sometimes misinterpret what the original author of a text meant to say. As a novel is translated, the translator’s interpretations and misinterpretations of the author's words are integrated into a new form of the text, slightly or extensively changing the fictional world in a story. In Part six of Anna Karenina, what role does misinterpretation play between Levin and Kitty at their new estate?

3. In Russian Levin's estate, Pokrovskoe, is associated with the word "Pokrov," which means "The Protective Veil of the Virgin." Vronsky's estate, Vozdvizhenskoe, is associated with "to build, erect" and with the word "Vozdvizhenie," which means "The Exaltation of the Cross." How does this affect your reading of the two different estates in part six?


Rake: noun (Man)
"A man, especially one who is rich or with a high social position, who lives in an immoral way, especially having sex with a lot of women." - Cambridge Dictionary
Translation
Important Terms:
Source text
- The original text
Target text
- The translation of the source text.
Equivalent effect
- When a target text produces the same meaning and influence on readers as the original text.
-EX:
funny original text >> funny target text
Register
- The level of formality or form of language used in the original text.
Three Types of Translation by Russian structuralist Roman Jakobson (On Linguistic Works of Translation, 1959)
1)
Intralingual
– rewording/paraphrasing/summarizing/expanding/commenting on source text within the language that it was written.
2)
Interlingual
– Translation of meaning between languages, from the source text to the target text.
3)
Intersemiotic
– Producing a new form of a written text, such as the film version of Anna Karenina.



Translation
Latin translatio - trans- + fero =
"to carry across,"

"to bring across."
Literary Translation is not literal translation; it involves the
transfer of meaning across different languages and cultures
. Literature employs a creative use of language to produce messages, and the translator must replicate that creativity in a way that appeals to the understanding of a new cultural audience.
In the case of Tolstoy, the translator must recreate Anna Karenina in a way that translates Russian grammar, cultural references, responses, emotions, humor, etc into a text that is understood by those living outside of Russian culture.
The translator essentially rewrites the original text for a new audience.


- Known to leave out passages that she could not translate quickly.
Repetition
‘And are they at home, my dear man?’ Darya Alexandrovna said vaguely, not even knowing how to ask the muzhik about Anna.
‘Should be,’ said the muzhik, shifting his bare feet and leaving a clear, five-toed footprint in the dust. ‘Should be,’ he repeated,
obviously willing to strike up conversation.
‘There’s more guests came yesterday. No end of guests…what is it?’ He turned to a lad who shouted something to him from the cart. ‘Ah, yes! They just passed here on horseback to go and look at a reaper. They should be home by now. And where are you from?...”
‘Far away,’ said the coachman, getting up on the box. ‘So it’s near by?’
‘I told you, it’s right here. Just beyond…’ he said, moving his head on the splash-board.
A young, hale, strapping fellow also came over. ‘Is there any work at the harvesting?’ he asked.
‘I don’t know, my dear.’
‘So just go left and you come straight to it,’ said the muzhik,
obviously wishing to talk and reluctant to let the travelers go.
The coachman started, but they had not sooner made the turn than they heard the muzhik shouting:
‘Wait! Hey, wait, man!’ two voices cried.
The coachman stopped.

‘It’s them coming!

There they are!
’ cried the muzhik.
‘See them coming along!’
He said, pointing to four people on horseback and two in a char a’ blanc moving along the road.
- Anna Karenina pt. 6, ch. 17, pg. 609-610


Find the Differences: Part 6, Chapter 13, 595-596
These two joys, the lucky hunting and the note from his wife, were so great that the two minor unpleasantnesses that occurred afterwards passed easily for him. One was that the chestnut outrunner, evidently overworked the day before, was off her feed and looked dull. The coachman said she had been strained.

She was overdriven yesterday, Konstantin Dmitrich,’ he said. ‘Of course, she was pushed hard those seven miles!’

The other unpleasantness that upset his good mood at first, but at which he later laughed a great deal, was that of all the provisions, which Kitty had sent with them in such abundance that it seemed they could not have been eaten in a week, nothing remained. Coming back from the hunt tired and hungry, Levin had been dreaming so specifically of pirozhki that, as he approached their quarters, he could already feel their smell and taste in his mouth, they was Laska could sense game, and he at once ordered Filipp to serve them. It turned out that there were not only no pirozhki but no chicken either.

‘Quite an appetite!” Said Stepan Arkadyich, laughing and pointing at Vasenka Veslovsky, ‘I don’t suffer from lack of appetite myself, but this is astonishing…’
‘Mais c’etait delicieux.’ Veslovsky praised the beef he had just eaten.
‘Well, nothing to be done!” said Levin, giving Veslovsky a dark look.
‘Serve some beef, then, Filipp.’
‘The beef got eaten. I gave the bone to the dogs,’ Filipp replied.
Levin was so upset that he said vexedly:
‘You might have left me at least something!’ and nearly wept.
‘Clean the game,’ he said to Filipp in a trembling voice, trying not to look at Vasenka, ‘and layer it with nettles. And fetch me some milk at least.’
Later on, when he had drunk his fill of milk, he felt ashamed at having shown vexation to a stranger, and he started laughing at his hungry anger.

That evening they hunted in yet another field, where Veslovsky also shot several birds, and at night they returned home.

The way back was as merry as the way there. Veslovsky sang, then recalled with pleasure his exploits with the muzhiks who had treated him to vodka and said ‘No offence’, then his night’s exploits with the nuts and the farm girl, and the muzhik who had asked him whether he was married or not and, on learning that he was not, had told him: ‘ Don’t you go looking at other men’s wives; you’d best get one of your own.’ These words especially made Veslovsky laugh. Pgs 595-96 ch 13

Part 6 Chapter 13 595-596
‘Quite an
(Well, this fellow's)
appetite!” Said Stepan Arkadyich, laughing and pointing at Vasenka Veslovsky, ‘I don’t
(never)
suffer from lack
(loss)
of appetite
myself
, but this
(he's)
is
(really)
astonishing
(marvelous)
…’
‘Mais c’etait delicieux.’ Veslovsky praised the beef he had just eaten (Not in Garnett translation).
‘Well, nothing to
(it can't)
be done
(helped)
!” said Levin, giving
(looking gloomily at)
Veslovsky a dark look.

(Well, Filipp,)
Serve
(give me)
some beef, then,
Filipp.

‘The beef
('s)
got
(been)
eaten
.

(and)

I gave
the bone
(s) (given)
to the dogs,’ Filipp replied
(answered)
.
Levin was so upset
(hurt)
that he said vexedly
(in a tone of vexation)
:
‘You might have left me
at least
something!’ and
(he felt)
nearly
(ready to)
wept
(cry)
.

(And)
Clean
(put away)
the game,’ he said to Filipp in a trembling
(shaking)
voice, trying not to look at Vasenka, ‘and layer
(cover)
it
(them)
with nettles. And fetch me some milk at least
(you might at least ask for some milk for me)
.’
Later on
(But)
, when he had drunk his fill of
(some)
milk, he felt ashamed
(immediately)
at
(and)
having shown vexation
(annoyance)
to a stranger, and he started
(began)
laughing at his hungry anger
(mortification)
.

That
(In the)
evening they
(went shooting)
hunted in yet another field
(again)
, where
(and)
Veslovsky also shot several birds
(has several successful shots)
, and at night they returned
(drove)
home.

The way back
(Their homeward journey)
was as merry
(lively)
as the way
(their drive)
there
(had been)
. Veslovsky sang
(songs)
, then
(and)
recalled
(related)
with pleasure
(enjoyment)
his exploits
(adventures)
with the muzhiks
(peasants)
who had treated
(regaled)
him to
(with)
vodka and said
(to him)
‘No offence’
('Excuse our homely ways')
, then
(and)
his night’s exploits
(adventures)
with the nuts
(kiss in the ring)
and the farm
(servant)
girl, and the muzhik
(peasant)
who had asked him whether
(was)
he
was
married
or not
and, on learning that he was not, had told
(said to)
him: ‘
(Well, mind you)
Don’t
you
go looking at
(after)
other men’s wives; you’d best
(better)
get one of your own.’ These words especially
(particularly)
made Veslovsky laugh
(amused)
. Pgs 595-96 ch 13

A Perspective on Translation

Cultural Differences: Proverbs
Full transcript