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4th American Indian Teacher Education Conference

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Kyle Wilson

on 3 October 2014

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Transcript of 4th American Indian Teacher Education Conference

Final Thoughts
“…Native education must be viewed holistically rather than fragmented with basic skills, Native studies, and other classes taught in isolation from one another… dropout prevention needs to be treated holistically… Too often well meaning add-on remedial programs focus on finding the reason for failure in students and their homes, ‘blaming the victims’… The idea that Native students are ‘culturally disadvantaged’ or ‘culturally deprived’ reflects an ethnocentric bias that should not continue. When schools do not recognize, value, and build on what Native students learn at home, they are given a watered-down, spread out curriculum that is meant to guarantee student learning but which often results in their education being slowed and their being ‘bored out’ of school. The ‘traditional school system’ has failed dropouts rather than they having failed the system.”
--J. Reyner, Plans for Dropout Prevention and Special School Support Services for American Indian and Alaska Native Students (1992)
“Reaching the Unreached”
Context: Providing awareness of disparities with Yaqui community of Guadalupe in Phoenix Metro Area.

Problem: Community members within Guadalupe suffer from poverty, lack of employment, crime, and other forms of marginalization and disenfranchisement

Solution: Disseminate information to increase awareness of situation through documentary/digital media
“Indigenous resilience”
Context: Community building through university NA student orgs.

Problem: Disconnect between Native community because of philosophical ideas.

Solution: Organize a collaborative effort for an event during ASUs Native American Culture Week:
Native Americans Taking Initiative on Success (NATIONS)
American Indian Graduate Student Assoc. (AIGSA)
Council Advocating an Indigenous Manifesto (CAIM)
Pictures of event
Sequential series of assignments
ENG 101
Unit 1: “Personal/Historical” Analysis (Descriptive Narrative Essay)
Unit 2: “Indigenous Issues” (Informative Essay)
Unit 3: “Critical Analysis of Indigenous Rhetoric” (Critical Analysis)

ENG 102
Unit 1: “Evaluation of an Indigenous Issue” (Evaluative Argument)
Unit 2: “Commercialism in Indian Country” (Causal Argument)
Unit 4: “Community Outreach” (Proposal Enactment)
Providing Student Centered Learning
Goals and outcomes
Instructional Goals
Provide culturally sensitive curriculum
Promote student-centered learning
Strengthen communication skills
Foster cross-cultural environment/inter-cultural partnerships
Promote public discourse of issues
Student Learning Outcomes
Prepare students for academic writing
Strengthen students’ research skills
Develop writing aesthetics
Enhance students’ communication skills
Identifying opportunities
Movement from “remedial” to “higher standards” first-year composition course:
Swim with the current
Context, then content

From 1998/2000“an average of 25% of Native Americans were living in poverty”(US Census Bureau)

“I/3 Native American females will suffer sexual assault in their lives…” (The Washington Post, 2007)

“American Indian and Alaska Native students have a dropout rate twice the national average [over 30%]; the highest… of any United States ethnic or racial group.” (Reyner, 1992)
Table of contents
Foundations
Context, then content
Identifying opportunities
Providing student centered learning
Parallel Universes
“Conference on College Composition and Communication” (CCCC)
Regular ENG 101 and 102
Indigenous Rhetoric: 101 and 102
The Assignments
ENG 101
ENG 102
Community Outreach Project: “Indigenous Resilience”
Community Outreach Project: “Reaching the Unreached”
Questions
Thank you
Contact Info

Kyle Grant Wilson
Indigenous Rhetoric Coordinator
Academic Associate
Department of English
Arizona State University
Tempe Campus
Tempe AZ, 85287-0302

kyle.wilson@asu.edu
Appendix
ENG 101 Textbook
http://www.wwnorton.com/college/english/write/fieldguide/writing_toolbar1.asp?pgname=genres1.asp&title=Genres
Blackboard Shell
https://myasucourses.asu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_197506_1
Pres. Bush Defines Sovereignty
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kdimK1onR4o
Course Readings
“Downtown Oklahoma City” V. Bomberry
“School Days of an Indian Girl” Sitkala-Sa
“All the Colors of the Sunset” L. Tapahonso
“Indian Killer” (First 2 chapters) S. Alexie
“The Double-Bind of American Indian Need Based Sovereignty”J. Cattelino
“When Women Throw Down Bundles” P. Allen
“Where I Come from is Like This” P. Allen
“Power Place and Personality” V. Deloria
“Transitional Education” V. Deloria
“Higher Education and Self-Determination” V. Deloria
“Ethics and Responsibilities in Writing American Indian History” D. Fixico
Indigenous rhetoric curriculum
Satisfy Goals and Outcomes of CCCC
Establish rhetorical knowledge
Implement critical thinking and reading
Develop various writing processes
Practice strong writing conventions

Simultaneously giving privilege to Indigeneity
Provide a contemporary and historical context
Privilege Indigenous knowledge and values
Identifying problems and providing feasible solutions
Stress idea of ethos is gained in Indigenous context
Ultimately, implement social embeddedness as core of curriculum
Mission
Indigenous Rhetoric courses provide ENG 101/102 curriculum that is culturally responsive to Indigenous worldviews. Open to all students, these courses aim to increase student success by utilizing diverse texts and learning strategies in the teaching of English writing skills. Curriculum in these courses offer varied cultural perspectives, ideas, and experiences as the foundation of learning and practicing writing aesthetics.
Identifying Opportunities
Conditions in which we exist:

“American Indian and Alaska Native students have a dropout rate twice the national average; the highest… of any United States ethnic or racial group. About three out of every ten Native students drop out of… high school both on reservations and in cities”. J. Reyner, Plans for Dropout Prevention and Special School Support Services for American Indian and Alaska Native Students (1992)
Context, Then content
“…Dropout prevention starts with caring teachers who give students every chance for success in the classroom through interactive and experiential teaching methodologies, relevant, and culturally appropriate curriculum. At risk students need peer support through cooperative instructional methodologies and peer counseling programs. Dropout prevention also includes support services outside of the classroom from school administrators and counselors who work closely with parents…”

J. Reyner, Plans for Dropout Prevention and Special School Support Services for American Indian and Alaska Native Students (1992)
Writing and teaching a culturally responsive curriculum
Kyle Grant Wilson

Arizona State University
Indigenous Rhetoric at
Arizona State University

Training Staff in Native Based Content to Provide Accessibility and Increase Student Success Rates
Kyle Grant Wilson

Arizona State University
Unity: Journalists of Color Conference (2006)
Defining Sovereignty
Indigenous Rhetoric @ Arizona State University
Foundations
Context, then content
Overview of first 5 years of program
Prospectus on next 5 years
Resourcing Technology
How to make an entire library fit in your pocket (QR codes)
Wordpress archive webpages
Mobile devices in classroom
Social media (Facebook, Twitter, and Pixable) in classroom
Training staff
Assignment example
Students as "knowledge gatherers"
From Arizona State University's Mission Statement
by Samuel Lee
"Reaching the Unreached"
This project is a film student's documentary about conditions existent within the Yaqui community of Guadalupe, AZ meant to provide insight and raise awareness of a marginalized group very near campus.
Addressing Problem of Disconnect
Context, then Content
Context, then Content

From 1998/2000“an average of 25% of Native Americans were living in poverty”(US Census Bureau)

“I/3 Native American females will suffer sexual assault in their lives…” (The Washington Post, 2007)

“American Indian and Alaska Native students have a dropout rate twice the national average [over 30%]; the highest… of any United States ethnic or racial group.” (Reyner, 1992)
Context, Then Content
“…Dropout prevention starts with caring teachers who give students every chance for success in the classroom through interactive and experiential teaching methodologies, relevant, and culturally appropriate curriculum. At risk students need peer support through cooperative instructional methodologies and peer counseling programs. Dropout prevention also includes support services outside of the classroom from school administrators and counselors who work closely with parents…”

J. Reyhner, Plans for Dropout Prevention and Special School Support Services for American Indian and Alaska Native Students (1992)
Swim with the current
ASU Downtown Phoenix campus
15,000 students

ASU Polytechnic campus
15,000

ASU Tempe campus
50,000

ASU West campus
15,000

ASU Online
100,000 learners
Access and quality for all
To establish ASU as the model for a
New American University, measured
not by who we exclude, but rather by
who we include; pursuing research
and discovery that benefits the public
good; assuming major responsibility
for the economic, social, and cultural
vitality and health and well-being of
the community.
ASU Vision
Center for the Future of Arizona
University as Entrepreneur
Stardust Center for Affordable Homes and the Family
Morrison Institute
Social Embeddedness Initiative
Decision Theater
ASU Technopolis
University School Partnerships Initiative
Phoenix Urban Research Laboratory
Math and Science Teacher Initiative
Enhance our local impact and social embeddedness
Improve local and regional linkages with social and community development groups
Establish and strengthen local, regional and national linkages with NGOs, government and public agencies, and private sector organizations with a focus on community development
Undertake applied sustainability research that impacts the social, environmental and economic evolution of the Southwest United States
Provide ongoing and objective monitoring of the region’s progress through the ASU indicators project
Enhance our local impact and social embeddedness
Liberal Arts>25 schools and departments
Public Service4-5 schools
Education1 school (teacher focused)
Engineering 2 schools
Design and the Arts7 schools
Law >1 school
Science3-4 schools
Business and Management1 school
Sustainability1 school
Medicine Nursing and >2 schools
Health Innovations
Establish national standing in academic quality and impact of colleges and schools in every field

Attain national standing in academic quality for each school
Achieve national standing in the value added to graduates in each school
Become the leading university, in terms of academics, faculty, discovery and research, in at least one core subject within each school or college
Establish national standing in academic quality and impact of colleges and schools in every field
Expand university access to match Arizona’s growth and diversification
Improve freshmen persistence to 90 percent
Boost the university’s graduation rate to 70-75 percent as soon as possible
Develop an ASU culture that represents a commitment to quality and community outreach
Enroll 100,000 continuing education and degree completion students (including AZUN)
Increase baccalaureate degree production by enhancing linkages with Arizona community colleges
Enhance individual student learning and student development
Access and quality for all
Research Infrastructure Projects
New Computer Science Complex
Biodesign Building A
Biodesign Building B
Interdisciplinary Science & Technology Building IV
Biodesign Buildings C-D
Intersdisciplinary Science & Technology Building VI-X
Arts and Business Gateway
MacroTechnology Works
W. P. Carey School campus
Sandra Day O’Connor Law School campus
National comprehensive university by 2012
Transdisciplinary schools
SkySong
Mayo Partnership
Biodesign Institute
Faculty Expansion
Global Institute for Sustainability
Biomedical Informatics
Global Health
Public Health
Arizona Technology Enterprises (AZTE)
National comprehensive university by 2012
Become a leading center for interdisciplinary science and technology discovery and development
Become a leading center for discovery and scholarship in the social sciences, arts and humanities
Increase research and discovery competitiveness to more than $350 million (2006 dollars) in annual research expenditures
Augment regional economic competitiveness through research and discovery and value-added education programs
National comprehensive university
by 2012
Leveraging our place
Transform society
Value entrepreneurship
Conduct use-inspired research
Enable student success
Fuse intellectual disciplines
Be socially embedded
Engage globally
Design aspirations for a
New American University
August 2010
Vision, Mission and Goals
Building a Longstanding Program
Feasibility and Opportunity
ENG 101/102: Indigenous Rhetoric
Mission
Indigenous Rhetoric courses provide ENG 101/102 curriculum that is culturally responsive to Indigenous worldviews. Open to all students, these courses aim to increase student success by utilizing diverse texts and learning strategies in the teaching of English writing skills. Curriculum in these courses offer varied cultural perspectives, ideas, and experiences as the foundation of learning and practicing writing aesthetics.
Contact Info
Thank you
Kyle Grant Wilson
Indigenous Rhetoric Coordinator
Academic Professional
Department of English
Arizona State University
Tempe Campus

kyle.wilson@asu.edu
Jon Reyhner, Plans for Dropout Prevention and Special School Support for American Indian and Alaskan Native Students (1992)
Final Thoughts
“…Native education must be viewed holistically rather than fragmented with basic skills, Native studies, and other classes taught in isolation from one another… dropout prevention needs to be treated holistically… Too often well meaning add-on remedial programs focus on finding the reason for failure in students and their homes, ‘blaming the victims’… The idea that Native students are ‘culturally disadvantaged’ or ‘culturally deprived’ reflects an ethnocentric bias that should not continue. When schools do not recognize, value, and build on what Native students learn at home, they are given a watered-down, spread out curriculum that is meant to guarantee student learning but which often results in their education being slowed and their being ‘bored out’ of school. The ‘traditional school system’ has failed dropouts rather than they having failed the system.”

--J. Reyhner, Plans for Dropout Prevention and Special School Support Services for American Indian and Alaska Native Students (1992)
Instructional Goals

--Provide culturally sensitive curriculum
--Promote student-centered learning
--Strengthen communication skills
--Foster cross-cultural environment/inter-cultural partnerships
--Promote public discourse of Native issues
Intrinsic Value Systems to Empowerment
Student Centered Learning
Primary Directives
Writing, Research, Critical Thinking
Intrinsic Value to Learning
Holistic Writing
Cognitive Awareness
Empowerment
Experiential
Social Embeddedness
Problem Solving
Ancillary Methods
Online Software, Programs and Sources
Digital Media
Expectations
Writing Competencies
Leadership Skills
Social Responsibility
Curriculum Overview
A 25 Year History
Singular V Pluralistic
Rainbow Sections (1984-2005)
Indigenous Rhetoric (2008-pres)
(cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr
-Retention for NA students
-Provide a space for NA students to write about their lives
-Primarily expressive writing and “I-Search” research
-Singular methodology
-Retention for NA students
-Provides a space for all students to research and articulate Indigenous issues
-All research intensive coupled with fundamentals of rhetoric
-Pluralistic methodology
101 and 102
Sequence of Assignments
ENG 101
-Unit 1: “Personal/Historical” Analysis (Descriptive Narrative Essay)
-Unit 2: “Indigenous Issues” (Informative Essay)
-Unit 3: “Critical Analysis of Indigenous Rhetoric” (Critical Analysis)

ENG 102
-Unit 1: “Evaluation of an Indigenous Issue” (Evaluative Argument)
-Unit 2: “Commercialism in Indian Country” (Causal Argument)
-Unit 3: “A Marginalized Proposal” (Proposal Enactment)
All Indigenous Authors
Course Readings
-“Downtown Oklahoma City” V. Bomberry
-“School Days of an Indian Girl” Sitkala-Sa
-“All the Colors of the Sunset” L. Tapahonso
-“Indian Killer” (First 2 chapters) S. Alexie
-“The Double-Bind of American Indian Need Based Sovereignty”J. Cattelino
-“When Women Throw Down Bundles” P. Allen
-“Where I Come from is Like This” P. Allen
-“Power Place and Personality” V. Deloria
-“Transitional Education” V. Deloria
-“Higher Education and Self-Determination” V. Deloria
-“Ethics and Responsibilities in Writing American Indian History” D. Fixico
“Indigenous Resilience”
Context: Community building through university NA student orgs.

Problem: Disconnect between Native community because of philosophical ideas.

Solution: Organize a collaborative effort for an event during ASUs Native American Culture Week:
Native Americans Taking Initiative on Success (NATIONS)
American Indian Graduate Student Assoc. (AIGSA)
Council Advocating an Indigenous Manifesto (CAIM)
Pictures of event
“Reaching the Unreached”
Context: Providing awareness of disparities with Yaqui community of Guadalupe in Phoenix Metro Area.

Problem: Community members within Guadalupe suffer from poverty, lack of employment, crime, and other forms of marginalization and disenfranchisement

Solution: Disseminate information to increase awareness of situation through documentary/digital media
Community Building and Raising Awareness
Student Examples
Next 5 Years of IR @ ASU
Directives: Incorporate more technology within the classroom and provide more classes on other campuses and online.
Resourcing Technology
"Indigenous Rhetoric Library" Initiative
Resourcing Technology
Wordpress Archive Webpages
ENG 101
ENG 102
Resourcing Technology
Social Media
facebook
by Teiyanknei Mae Dale
Indigenous Resilience
Philosophy is that the Indigenous Rhetoric program strives to offer student-centered learning in every available method and in the contemporary context, technology is the direction this program has chosen to provide more accessible instruction in the classroom to increase success rates and education of a more intrisic value.
Full transcript