Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

ALL CHILDREN DESERVE TO BE SAFE

No description

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of ALL CHILDREN DESERVE TO BE SAFE

?
WHO ARE MANDATORY REPORTERS
Childcare and other early learning professionals

Medical practitioners

Professional school staff, including those working in higher education

Law enforcement

State employees
MANDATORY REPORTERS INCLUDE:
For complete list:

http://apps.leg.wa.gov/rcw/default.aspx?cite=26.44.030
CHILDREN DESERVE TO BE SAFE
Mandatory Reporter E-Learning
WHAT IS CHILD ABUSE OR NEGLECT?
PHYSICAL ABUSE
SEXUAL ABUSE
SEXUAL EXPLOITATION
Throwing, kicking, burning, or cutting a child

Striking a child with a closed fist, shaking a child under age three

Interfering with a child's breathing

Threatening a child with a deadly weapon

Doing anything else that is likely to cause or which does cause bodily harm greater than transient pain or minor temporary marks or which is injurious to the child's health, welfare, and safety
TYPES OF
PHYSICAL
ABUSE
Intentional touching, either directly or through the clothes, the sexual or other intimate parts of a child

Allowing or causing a child to engage in touching the sexual or other intimate parts of another for the purpose of sexual gratification of the person touching the child, the child, or a third party
TYPES OF
SEXUAL
ABUSE
Prostitution

Sexually explicit, obscene or pornographic activity to be photographed, filmed, or electronically transmitted

Sexually explicit, obscene, or pornographic activity as a part of a live performance, or sexual gratification of another person
TYPES OF
SEXUAL
EXPLOITATION
NEGLECT
ABANDONMENT
Failure to provide adequate food, shelter, clothing, supervision, or health care for a child

Actions, failure to act or omissions that result in injury or create a risk of to the physical, emotional and/or cognitive development of a child
TYPES OF
NEGLECT
Deserts the child with the intent to abandon

Leaves the child without food, water, shelter, etc.

Foregoes parental rights, functions, duties and obligations for an extended period of time
TYPES OF
ABANDONMENT
Physical, Behavioral, Statements by Child, Statements by Parent
INDICATORS OF
ABUSE & NEGLECT
Injuries to the back, neck, buttocks, or genitals

Injuries with no explanation or a reason that isn't logical

Difficulty walking or sitting, avoiding the use of an injured part of the body

Ongoing patterns of injuries that appear excessive or easily avoidable under adequate supervision

Medical, dental, vision or mental health needs that appear to go unaddressed, but have been discussed with the parent

Failure to thrive when no clear medical cause can be identified

Frequently dirty or smelly, has poor hygiene or often wears clothes inadequate for the weather

A girl who becomes pregnant at a very young age

A child who has a sexually transmitted infection
Sudden or significant changes in behavior

Learning or attention problems without reasonable explanations

A child who seems to be preparing for something bad to happen

A child who is or becomes extremely withdrawn

A child who is indiscriminately affectionate with adults

Arriving at school early, leaving late or not wanting to go home on an ongoing basis

Frequent absences from school or other activities

The appearance of extreme fatigue on a regular basis
Statements about being alone or unsupervised at home before they can safely care for themselves

Statements that they fear or do not like their parent or caregiver, or that they don’t want to go home

Begging for food or asking others to supply basic necessities

Statements about being afraid when parents or caregivers use alcohol, drugs, fight or display bizarre behavior

Reporting no attachment to the parent or caregiver

Statements that indicate a sophisticated, age-inappropriate understanding about sex

Direct statements about experiencing abuse or neglect by a parent or caregiver
Disregard for the child’s feelings, needs or emotions

Showing little concern for the child

Blaming the child for struggles at school or home

Requesting that teachers or others use harsh or unusual discipline techniques with the child

Seeing the child as entirely bad, evil, worthless or a burden

Describing the child in sexual terms, implying that the child may provoke sexual contact from others

Demanding that the child behave in ways inappropriate to their skills or developmental level

Seeming to purposefully isolate the child, including removing them from school or other activities

Offering conflicting, unconvincing or no explanation for injuries or events

Appears extremely impaired by a mental health, substance abuse or other issue
YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE CERTAIN THAT CHILD ABUSE HAS OCCURRED, OR THAT A CHILD IS IN DANGER TO MAKE A REPORT.
REMEMBER
It is better to report or discuss you concerns with professionals who can help, than to remain silent.
DOMESTIC
VIOLENCE
UNSUPERVISED
OR "LATCHKEY" CHILDREN
CORPORAL
PUNISHMENT
COMMON SITUATIONS
THAT CAUSE CONCERN
FOR MANDATORY REPORTERS
FAILURE TO OBTAIN MEDICAL CARE
PERSONAL BIASES
IN IDENTIFYING CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT
PRENATAL SUBSTANCE USE
The Following video explains what is known about racial disproportionality in the child welfare system, and how you might play a part in correcting this concern in our state.
PREPARING FOR THE REPORT
Having the right information to create a better understanding of the situation
Child's full legal name

Date of birth

Address

Contact information
THINGS TO HAVE:
The more relevant
information the better!
Parents and caregivers full legal names

Contact information

Nonresidential parents

Other Children
Name of school or daycare

The family’s preferred language, and whether an interpreter is needed

Any concerns regarding the safety of a worker assigned to assess the child’s situation

Any indicators of abuse or neglect

History of your concerns about the family

General functioning of the child including medical diagnoses, disabilities or unique care needs
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Statements they have made to you or others about the child or the situation

Information that leads you to suspect drug or alcohol abuse or possible violence in the home

Indications of cognitive impairments or mental health concerns in the parent

Anything that seems to impact the parents’ ability to adequately and safely respond to the child’s needs

If other concerns have ever been discussed with them, whether by you or someone else, report their reaction and what steps were or were not taken to address the situation.
INFORMATION ABOUT PARENTS
OR FAMILY OF THE CHILD
ALSO REPORT
WHAT IS GOING WELL
IN THE FAMILY
Federal law requires that we identify any Indian ancestry related to the child and their biological parents
HOW TO MAKE A REPORT
When and how to make a report, and what might happen afterwards
48
The law requires that a report of suspected child abuse or neglect be made at the first possible opportunity, and no longer than 48 hours after the mandated reporter has reasonable cause to believe the child had suffered abuse or neglect.
HOURS
Provide your name, relationship to the child or family, and your contact information
HOW TO CONTACT CHILDREN'S ADMINISTRATION TO MAKE A REPORT
This confirms that you have met your responsibility as a mandated reporter and allows Children’s Administration staff to contact you if needed
For complete list:
https://fortress.wa.gov/dshs/f2ws03apps/caofficespub/offices/general/OfficePick.asp
24 Hours A Day, 7 Days A Week, All Year
1-866-EndHarm
(1-866-363-4276)

TDD: 360-902-7906
TYY: 1-800-624-6186
Hearing Impaired Inquiries may be directed to:
during
working
hours
Use the phone number listed as “Toll Free Intake” under the “Phone Numbers” section
You must report
ABUSE or NEGLECT
towards anyone younger than 18.
IT'S THE LAW.
18
Child =
Person under
WHAT WE WILL COVER
Possible Indicators of abuse or neglect
Types of information to gather for your report
Overview of the reporting process and outcomes
MAKING A REPORT
MEETS YOUR OBLIGATION
Information is gathered so a screening can be made
Allegations and concerns meeting CPS criteria are "Screened In"
Reports that don't meet criteria are
"Screened Out"
WHAT HAPPENS DURING THE CALL
FAQ's
MANDATORY REPORTERS ARE LEGALLY OBLIGATED TO MAKE A REPORT
You Need A Clear Link For Certain Circumstances To Constitute Neglect
Substance Abuse Is Given "Great Weight"
Safety of Newborn Children Act
HOW DOES A REPORT SCREEN IN OR OUT?
QUESTION 1
Is The Victim Under 18 Years Of Age?
QUESTION 2
If the allegations/information are true, does the situation minimally meet the the legal definition of child abuse or neglect?
QUESTION 3
Is the alleged subject acting as a parent/caregiver, or is the alleged unknown? OR Is the alleged subject providing care in a facility subject to licensing by DSHS, DEL or state-regulated care?
IMMINENT RISK OF SERIOUS HARM
?
The Worker Assigned May Contact You With Follow Up Questions To Help With Their Investigation
It Is The Role Of CPS To Protect Children From Current And Future Abuse & Neglect
FAQ
Are there penalties for not reporting? If so, what are they?
As a mandatory reporter, you can make a significant positive impact by reporting suspected child abuse and/or neglect.
THANK YOU
https://www.dshs.wa.gov/ca/child-safety-and-protection/how-report-child-abuse-or-neglect
The ultimate goal of intervention is the
safety of the child
and their family
Research suggests that child abuse and neglect occurs across racial and ethnic groups at surprisingly similar rates
More information about racial disproportionality in Washington State’s child welfare system can be found here:
https://www.dshs.wa.gov/ca/advancing-child-welfare/racial-disproportionality

Children's Administration's "Constituent Relations"
360-902-8060
https://www.dshs.wa.gov/ca/2210-office-assistant-secretary/2212-constituent-relations
https://www.dshs.wa.gov/ca/3000-customer-relations-and-communication/3200-citizen-complaints
Office of the Family and Children’s Ombuds:
http://ofco.wa.gov
For the Guide:
https://www.dshs.wa.gov/sites/default/files/SESA/publications/documents/22-163.pdf
Missing routine or follow up medical appointments

A child who cries, cowers or otherwise indicates that they don’t feel safe in the presence of a parent or caregiver

Stealing food or other necessities

Developmental regression, including incontinence when potty training has been well established

Running away from home

Attempting suicide or displaying self-injurious behaviors
Frequently Asked Questions from Mandated Reporters:
http://depts.washington.edu/acwewa/MandatoryReporterToolkitEnglish/Resources/Frequently Asked Questions from Mandated Reporters.pdf
Responding to Children when they Talk about Abuse or Neglect:
http://depts.washington.edu/acwewa/MandatoryReporterToolkitEnglish/Resources/Responding to Children.pdf

The Power of Partnership
The Alliance for Child Welfare Excellence is Washington’s first comprehensive statewide training partnership dedicated to developing professional expertise for social workers and enhancing the skills of foster parents and caregivers working with vulnerable children and families. The Alliance combines the resources of three higher-education institutions - UW School of Social Work, UW Tacoma’s Social Work Program and Eastern Washington University’s School of Social Work - with the expertise of the state’s Children’s Administration, and Partners for Our Children, a policy and analysis group charged with rigorously evaluating training effectiveness over time - a first in the nation.

https://allianceforchildwelfare.org
A presentation by the
Full transcript