Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Creation Myths of Finland

No description
by

Arooj Altaf

on 7 June 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Creation Myths of Finland

Arooj Altaf
Creation Myths
of Finland

Story
Why?
Contemporary Connections (What if?)
At first there was only water and air. Ilmatar (Finnish goddess of air) descended to the primordial sea in search for a resting place.
She swam and floated in the water for 700 years, wishing there was more life.
One day, she noticed a flying teal and raised her knee to let the teal land.
The teal made a nest on Ilmatar's knee and laid 7 eggs: 6 golden and 1 made of iron.
The teal incubated her eggs for 3 days, creating heat. Eventually the heat
burnt Ilmatar's knee causing her to jerk her leg. This motion dislodged the
eggs, which then shattered in the waters.
Earth's land formed from the lower part of one of the eggshells while the sky and the clouds formed from the top. The yolk became
the sun and the whites transformed into the moon and
the stars.
Ilmatar later created beaches by moving her arms,
cliffs and contours just by pointing, and her foot prints
became pools for the fish.
Painting of Ilmatar
Cookie mold by Oldrich Kvapil
Books written by Juha Y. Pentikainen and Willaim .F.
Kirby
Painting being made by Pipka
Left and Right:
Water represents renewal, transformation, purity, and fertility. Symbolically, it is often viewed as the source of life itself. In the
creation myth of Finland life emerged from the primordial waters.
The color Turquoise (color of the Teal) is associated with
meanings of refreshing, energy, ingenuity, and patience.
Ilmatar used her ability of creativity to further create the
wonders of the world.
Teal symbolizes resourcefulness, ecstasy, and freedom (they can walk, swim, and fly). The creation of the world took place after a teal emerged on Ilmatar's knee. Now Ilmatar could not only swim in the water but she could also live on land.

Ilmatar jerked her knee on the third day when she couldn't control the heat
and that's when the earth and land formed. In religious terms, God also
created earth on the 3rd day.
The world evolved from an egg. Egg is a symbol of prosperity, rebirth, and the cycle of life. The different parts of an egg transformed into land, sun, sky etc. In religious terms, the Teal laid 6 golden eggs (they emblematize perfection and physical energy) and God created the world in 6 days, and rested on the 7th day.
How?

Ilmatar's ability of creativity allowed her to create so much. We should try to use our imagination to create something outside the box without any fears of being wrong.
She demonstrated the virtues of patience, self-
reliance, benevolent, and independency. If we
really want to accomplish something in life, we
need to learn to do our work autonomously and
be patient as patience brings rewards.
Before actually establishing something, she had to struggle through pain. We should not forget: No Pain No Gain.
Helping the teal allowed her to do something. We should never hesitate to help others because we rise by lifting others.
Ilmatar committed a mistake by jerking her leg which resulted in a positive outcome. We should appreciate and try to learn from our mistakes as they are a part of human being. They give us life lessons that can only be learned the hard way.
Contemporary Connections (What if?)
Full transcript