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People VS. Planet

This Prezi is titled People VS. Planet. It contains world population projections that show evidence of the world becoming overly populated. The evidence is ALL around us.
by

Madeline McGee

on 9 March 2015

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Transcript of People VS. Planet

YOU
McGeeMadeline
January 28, 2012
AP Language & Composition
Block Four

“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” Analysis
Martin Luther King Jr. wrote an extensive reply to eight clergymen from Alabama in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in response to harsh criticism of his civil rights efforts. King establishes a cordial yet forcefully persuasive tone, urging his audience to “rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood,” (para9) and join him in pursuit of ending segregation.
King begins his letter, “My dear fellow clergymen... I feel that you are men of genuine good will... [and] your criticisms are sincerely set forth...”, (para1) preparing his audience to listen with open minds to his words of wisdom in a sincere and respectful introduction. He introduces himself, “as [the] president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference”, (para2) using ethical appeal, gradually assuring his ‘fellow clergymen’ of his credibility and trustworthiness. These statements characterize King as a noble, honest, God-driven activist, optimistic of a future of equality.
King proceeds to include one of his many Biblical references, “[as] Paul...carried the gospel of Jesus Christ...I am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom...Like Paul, I must constantly respond...for aid." (para3) reminding his audience of knowledge in his religious occupation and personifying himself as Paul himself. Paul was a Christian, an apostle, and a prophet in the New Testament who wrote letters from jail to his followers and to churches. The more Paul wrote, the more people respected and trusted him. Sound familiar? That’s precisely the intentions of King in incorporating these similarities in his letter to his followers of freedom, compelling them to move, “...with a sense of great urgency towards the promised land of racial justice.” (para24) This statement is in reference to Moses of Egypt, leading the Israelites [the Jews] to the promised land God provided for them. King portrays this biblical statement as equality being the state that God intended for our nation as a whole by including, “...let him march, let him make prayer pilgrimages... let him go.” (para24) not simply by coincidence, but pertaining to Moses’ creed in the Old Testament, “Let them [my people] go!” [Exodus 9:1 NIV] to exclaim his cause: “Let my people [African Americans] go!”, free from slavery. Such a substantial amount of Biblical statements implicates that The Word of the Lord is helping to wage King’s war and will withstand against any weaponry of slavery that is set against him.
In the twelfth paragraph, King provides a vivid analogy, “...for more than 340 years [we’ve waited] for our constitutional and God given rights...[the] nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jet-like speed... [yet] we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a a lunch counter.” (para12). This illustration emphasizes the dire need for progression in segregation, adding to King’s elaboration that the time for change has been greatly surpassed. King beckons his audience to join him in battle against prejudice as it continually has restrained our nation from the promising future of freedom that’s within grasp if only there’s the desire to join in combat to fight for freedom.
King appears to read the minds of his audience by rhetorically asking questions as he does in paragraph 12, “How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?” King proceeds,“The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust.” (para12). King retains his audience’s attention in justifying his ‘civil disobedience’ by elaborating on the issue of racial segregation and presenting evidence that encourages others to join him. This tactic of rhetorical questions is yet another technique of King’s clarifying that he has the utmost and “highest respect for the law.” (para16) King’s reasoning and probing serves to directly answer questions and accusations written within the letter of criticism that he received.
At this point, King instructs his audience exactly what actions and approaches should be taken, “Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform... into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.” These allusions and contrasting terminology serve to provoke citizens, promise of a greater future, and leave them with the vision King expresses so vividly. King’s dream lingers within the mind of the reader with a satisfactory feeling of being a part of something greater, something to be remembered for, something that will make a difference, and overall something that urges King’s audience to participate and support the movement of fighting for civil rights.
The narrative alludes countless times to The Bible, but later refers to numerous intellectual scholars and influential leaders, ethically earning his audience’s trust. King refers to past historic events such as the Boston Tea Party as being, “a massive act of civil disobedience.” (para17) but positively changing the course of history. Some actions and risks have to be taken with only the best intentions in mind. This is precisely what King is doing as an activist. King speaks of history being a potential guide to refer to while forming new history, rather than repeating similar mistakes again and again, continuing the eternal cycle without progression being made.
Such wisdom stated in a calm and persuasive tone of determination throughout King’s narrative thoroughly convinces the audience of his sincerity and good will. King skillfully expresses his view of segregation communicating with clarity the evident progress that has yet to take place. Segregation and civil rights are of great significance to King and are presented in a way that obligates his audience to take action as King ignites and evokes emotions for the conclusion of racial injustice.

Works Cited
King Jr., Martin L. "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Letter to Eight Clergymen in Alabama. 16 Apr. 1963. Why We Can't Wait. New York: New American Library, 1963. 64-84. African Studies Center. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 25 Jan. 2012. <htttp://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html>.
McGeeMadeline
January 28, 2012
AP Language & Composition
Block Four

“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” Analysis
Martin Luther King Jr. wrote an extensive reply to eight clergymen from Alabama in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in response to harsh criticism of his civil rights efforts. King establishes a cordial yet forcefully persuasive tone, urging his audience to “rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood,” (para9) and join him in pursuit of ending segregation.
King begins his letter, “My dear fellow clergymen... I feel that you are men of genuine good will... [and] your criticisms are sincerely set forth...”, (para1) preparing his audience to listen with open minds to his words of wisdom in a sincere and respectful introduction. He introduces himself, “as [the] president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference”, (para2) using ethical appeal, gradually assuring his ‘fellow clergymen’ of his credibility and trustworthiness. These statements characterize King as a noble, honest, God-driven activist, optimistic of a future of equality.
King proceeds to include one of his many Biblical references, “[as] Paul...carried the gospel of Jesus Christ...I am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom...Like Paul, I must constantly respond...for aid." (para3) reminding his audience of knowledge in his religious occupation and personifying himself as Paul himself. Paul was a Christian, an apostle, and a prophet in the New Testament who wrote letters from jail to his followers and to churches. The more Paul wrote, the more people respected and trusted him. Sound familiar? That’s precisely the intentions of King in incorporating these similarities in his letter to his followers of freedom, compelling them to move, “...with a sense of great urgency towards the promised land of racial justice.” (para24) This statement is in reference to Moses of Egypt, leading the Israelites [the Jews] to the promised land God provided for them. King portrays this biblical statement as equality being the state that God intended for our nation as a whole by including, “...let him march, let him make prayer pilgrimages... let him go.” (para24) not simply by coincidence, but pertaining to Moses’ creed in the Old Testament, “Let them [my people] go!” [Exodus 9:1 NIV] to exclaim his cause: “Let my people [African Americans] go!”, free from slavery. Such a substantial amount of Biblical statements implicates that The Word of the Lord is helping to wage King’s war and will withstand against any weaponry of slavery that is set against him.
In the twelfth paragraph, King provides a vivid analogy, “...for more than 340 years [we’ve waited] for our constitutional and God given rights...[the] nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jet-like speed... [yet] we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a a lunch counter.” (para12). This illustration emphasizes the dire need for progression in segregation, adding to King’s elaboration that the time for change has been greatly surpassed. King beckons his audience to join him in battle against prejudice as it continually has restrained our nation from the promising future of freedom that’s within grasp if only there’s the desire to join in combat to fight for freedom.
King appears to read the minds of his audience by rhetorically asking questions as he does in paragraph 12, “How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?” King proceeds,“The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust.” (para12). King retains his audience’s attention in justifying his ‘civil disobedience’ by elaborating on the issue of racial segregation and presenting evidence that encourages others to join him. This tactic of rhetorical questions is yet another technique of King’s clarifying that he has the utmost and “highest respect for the law.” (para16) King’s reasoning and probing serves to directly answer questions and accusations written within the letter of criticism that he received.
At this point, King instructs his audience exactly what actions and approaches should be taken, “Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform... into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.” These allusions and contrasting terminology serve to provoke citizens, promise of a greater future, and leave them with the vision King expresses so vividly. King’s dream lingers within the mind of the reader with a satisfactory feeling of being a part of something greater, something to be remembered for, something that will make a difference, and overall something that urges King’s audience to participate and support the movement of fighting for civil rights.
The narrative alludes countless times to The Bible, but later refers to numerous intellectual scholars and influential leaders, ethically earning his audience’s trust. King refers to past historic events such as the Boston Tea Party as being, “a massive act of civil disobedience.” (para17) but positively changing the course of history. Some actions and risks have to be taken with only the best intentions in mind. This is precisely what King is doing as an activist. King speaks of history being a potential guide to refer to while forming new history, rather than repeating similar mistakes again and again, continuing the eternal cycle without progression being made.
Such wisdom stated in a calm and persuasive tone of determination throughout King’s narrative thoroughly convinces the audience of his sincerity and good will. King skillfully expresses his view of segregation communicating with clarity the evident progress that has yet to take place. Segregation and civil rights are of great significance to King and are presented in a way that obligates his audience to take action as King ignites and evokes emotions for the conclusion of racial injustice.

Works Cited
King Jr., Martin L. "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Letter to Eight Clergymen in Alabama. 16 Apr. 1963. Why We Can't Wait. New York: New American Library, 1963. 64-84. African Studies Center. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 25 Jan. 2012. <htttp://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html>.
McGeeMadeline
January 28, 2012
AP Language & Composition
Block Four

“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” Analysis
Martin Luther King Jr. wrote an extensive reply to eight clergymen from Alabama in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in response to harsh criticism of his civil rights efforts. King establishes a cordial yet forcefully persuasive tone, urging his audience to “rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood,” (para9) and join him in pursuit of ending segregation.
King begins his letter, “My dear fellow clergymen... I feel that you are men of genuine good will... [and] your criticisms are sincerely set forth...”, (para1) preparing his audience to listen with open minds to his words of wisdom in a sincere and respectful introduction. He introduces himself, “as [the] president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference”, (para2) using ethical appeal, gradually assuring his ‘fellow clergymen’ of his credibility and trustworthiness. These statements characterize King as a noble, honest, God-driven activist, optimistic of a future of equality.
King proceeds to include one of his many Biblical references, “[as] Paul...carried the gospel of Jesus Christ...I am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom...Like Paul, I must constantly respond...for aid." (para3) reminding his audience of knowledge in his religious occupation and personifying himself as Paul himself. Paul was a Christian, an apostle, and a prophet in the New Testament who wrote letters from jail to his followers and to churches. The more Paul wrote, the more people respected and trusted him. Sound familiar? That’s precisely the intentions of King in incorporating these similarities in his letter to his followers of freedom, compelling them to move, “...with a sense of great urgency towards the promised land of racial justice.” (para24) This statement is in reference to Moses of Egypt, leading the Israelites [the Jews] to the promised land God provided for them. King portrays this biblical statement as equality being the state that God intended for our nation as a whole by including, “...let him march, let him make prayer pilgrimages... let him go.” (para24) not simply by coincidence, but pertaining to Moses’ creed in the Old Testament, “Let them [my people] go!” [Exodus 9:1 NIV] to exclaim his cause: “Let my people [African Americans] go!”, free from slavery. Such a substantial amount of Biblical statements implicates that The Word of the Lord is helping to wage King’s war and will withstand against any weaponry of slavery that is set against him.
In the twelfth paragraph, King provides a vivid analogy, “...for more than 340 years [we’ve waited] for our constitutional and God given rights...[the] nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jet-like speed... [yet] we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a a lunch counter.” (para12). This illustration emphasizes the dire need for progression in segregation, adding to King’s elaboration that the time for change has been greatly surpassed. King beckons his audience to join him in battle against prejudice as it continually has restrained our nation from the promising future of freedom that’s within grasp if only there’s the desire to join in combat to fight for freedom.
King appears to read the minds of his audience by rhetorically asking questions as he does in paragraph 12, “How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?” King proceeds,“The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust.” (para12). King retains his audience’s attention in justifying his ‘civil disobedience’ by elaborating on the issue of racial segregation and presenting evidence that encourages others to join him. This tactic of rhetorical questions is yet another technique of King’s clarifying that he has the utmost and “highest respect for the law.” (para16) King’s reasoning and probing serves to directly answer questions and accusations written within the letter of criticism that he received.
At this point, King instructs his audience exactly what actions and approaches should be taken, “Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform... into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.” These allusions and contrasting terminology serve to provoke citizens, promise of a greater future, and leave them with the vision King expresses so vividly. King’s dream lingers within the mind of the reader with a satisfactory feeling of being a part of something greater, something to be remembered for, something that will make a difference, and overall something that urges King’s audience to participate and support the movement of fighting for civil rights.
The narrative alludes countless times to The Bible, but later refers to numerous intellectual scholars and influential leaders, ethically earning his audience’s trust. King refers to past historic events such as the Boston Tea Party as being, “a massive act of civil disobedience.” (para17) but positively changing the course of history. Some actions and risks have to be taken with only the best intentions in mind. This is precisely what King is doing as an activist. King speaks of history being a potential guide to refer to while forming new history, rather than repeating similar mistakes again and again, continuing the eternal cycle without progression being made.
Such wisdom stated in a calm and persuasive tone of determination throughout King’s narrative thoroughly convinces the audience of his sincerity and good will. King skillfully expresses his view of segregation communicating with clarity the evident progress that has yet to take place. Segregation and civil rights are of great significance to King and are presented in a way that obligates his audience to take action as King ignites and evokes emotions for the conclusion of racial injustice.

Works Cited
King Jr., Martin L. "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Letter to Eight Clergymen in Alabama. 16 Apr. 1963. Why We Can't Wait. New York: New American Library, 1963. 64-84. African Studies Center. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 25 Jan. 2012. <htttp://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html>.
McGeeMadeline
January 28, 2012
AP Language & Composition
Block Four

“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” Analysis
Martin Luther King Jr. wrote an extensive reply to eight clergymen from Alabama in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in response to harsh criticism of his civil rights efforts. King establishes a cordial yet forcefully persuasive tone, urging his audience to “rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood,” (para9) and join him in pursuit of ending segregation.
King begins his letter, “My dear fellow clergymen... I feel that you are men of genuine good will... [and] your criticisms are sincerely set forth...”, (para1) preparing his audience to listen with open minds to his words of wisdom in a sincere and respectful introduction. He introduces himself, “as [the] president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference”, (para2) using ethical appeal, gradually assuring his ‘fellow clergymen’ of his credibility and trustworthiness. These statements characterize King as a noble, honest, God-driven activist, optimistic of a future of equality.
King proceeds to include one of his many Biblical references, “[as] Paul...carried the gospel of Jesus Christ...I am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom...Like Paul, I must constantly respond...for aid." (para3) reminding his audience of knowledge in his religious occupation and personifying himself as Paul himself. Paul was a Christian, an apostle, and a prophet in the New Testament who wrote letters from jail to his followers and to churches. The more Paul wrote, the more people respected and trusted him. Sound familiar? That’s precisely the intentions of King in incorporating these similarities in his letter to his followers of freedom, compelling them to move, “...with a sense of great urgency towards the promised land of racial justice.” (para24) This statement is in reference to Moses of Egypt, leading the Israelites [the Jews] to the promised land God provided for them. King portrays this biblical statement as equality being the state that God intended for our nation as a whole by including, “...let him march, let him make prayer pilgrimages... let him go.” (para24) not simply by coincidence, but pertaining to Moses’ creed in the Old Testament, “Let them [my people] go!” [Exodus 9:1 NIV] to exclaim his cause: “Let my people [African Americans] go!”, free from slavery. Such a substantial amount of Biblical statements implicates that The Word of the Lord is helping to wage King’s war and will withstand against any weaponry of slavery that is set against him.
In the twelfth paragraph, King provides a vivid analogy, “...for more than 340 years [we’ve waited] for our constitutional and God given rights...[the] nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jet-like speed... [yet] we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a a lunch counter.” (para12). This illustration emphasizes the dire need for progression in segregation, adding to King’s elaboration that the time for change has been greatly surpassed. King beckons his audience to join him in battle against prejudice as it continually has restrained our nation from the promising future of freedom that’s within grasp if only there’s the desire to join in combat to fight for freedom.
King appears to read the minds of his audience by rhetorically asking questions as he does in paragraph 12, “How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?” King proceeds,“The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust.” (para12). King retains his audience’s attention in justifying his ‘civil disobedience’ by elaborating on the issue of racial segregation and presenting evidence that encourages others to join him. This tactic of rhetorical questions is yet another technique of King’s clarifying that he has the utmost and “highest respect for the law.” (para16) King’s reasoning and probing serves to directly answer questions and accusations written within the letter of criticism that he received.
At this point, King instructs his audience exactly what actions and approaches should be taken, “Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform... into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.” These allusions and contrasting terminology serve to provoke citizens, promise of a greater future, and leave them with the vision King expresses so vividly. King’s dream lingers within the mind of the reader with a satisfactory feeling of being a part of something greater, something to be remembered for, something that will make a difference, and overall something that urges King’s audience to participate and support the movement of fighting for civil rights.
The narrative alludes countless times to The Bible, but later refers to numerous intellectual scholars and influential leaders, ethically earning his audience’s trust. King refers to past historic events such as the Boston Tea Party as being, “a massive act of civil disobedience.” (para17) but positively changing the course of history. Some actions and risks have to be taken with only the best intentions in mind. This is precisely what King is doing as an activist. King speaks of history being a potential guide to refer to while forming new history, rather than repeating similar mistakes again and again, continuing the eternal cycle without progression being made.
Such wisdom stated in a calm and persuasive tone of determination throughout King’s narrative thoroughly convinces the audience of his sincerity and good will. King skillfully expresses his view of segregation communicating with clarity the evident progress that has yet to take place. Segregation and civil rights are of great significance to King and are presented in a way that obligates his audience to take action as King ignites and evokes emotions for the conclusion of racial injustice.

Works Cited
King Jr., Martin L. "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Letter to Eight Clergymen in Alabama. 16 Apr. 1963. Why We Can't Wait. New York: New American Library, 1963. 64-84. African Studies Center. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 25 Jan. 2012. <htttp://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html>.
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McGeeMadeline
January 28, 2012
AP Language & Composition
Block Four

“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” Analysis
Martin Luther King Jr. wrote an extensive reply to eight clergymen from Alabama in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in response to harsh criticism of his civil rights efforts. King establishes a cordial yet forcefully persuasive tone, urging his audience to “rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood,” (para9) and join him in pursuit of ending segregation.
King begins his letter, “My dear fellow clergymen... I feel that you are men of genuine good will... [and] your criticisms are sincerely set forth...”, (para1) preparing his audience to listen with open minds to his words of wisdom in a sincere and respectful introduction. He introduces himself, “as [the] president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference”, (para2) using ethical appeal, gradually assuring his ‘fellow clergymen’ of his credibility and trustworthiness. These statements characterize King as a noble, honest, God-driven activist, optimistic of a future of equality.
King proceeds to include one of his many Biblical references, “[as] Paul...carried the gospel of Jesus Christ...I am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom...Like Paul, I must constantly respond...for aid." (para3) reminding his audience of knowledge in his religious occupation and personifying himself as Paul himself. Paul was a Christian, an apostle, and a prophet in the New Testament who wrote letters from jail to his followers and to churches. The more Paul wrote, the more people respected and trusted him. Sound familiar? That’s precisely the intentions of King in incorporating these similarities in his letter to his followers of freedom, compelling them to move, “...with a sense of great urgency towards the promised land of racial justice.” (para24) This statement is in reference to Moses of Egypt, leading the Israelites [the Jews] to the promised land God provided for them. King portrays this biblical statement as equality being the state that God intended for our nation as a whole by including, “...let him march, let him make prayer pilgrimages... let him go.” (para24) not simply by coincidence, but pertaining to Moses’ creed in the Old Testament, “Let them [my people] go!” [Exodus 9:1 NIV] to exclaim his cause: “Let my people [African Americans] go!”, free from slavery. Such a substantial amount of Biblical statements implicates that The Word of the Lord is helping to wage King’s war and will withstand against any weaponry of slavery that is set against him.
In the twelfth paragraph, King provides a vivid analogy, “...for more than 340 years [we’ve waited] for our constitutional and God given rights...[the] nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jet-like speed... [yet] we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a a lunch counter.” (para12). This illustration emphasizes the dire need for progression in segregation, adding to King’s elaboration that the time for change has been greatly surpassed. King beckons his audience to join him in battle against prejudice as it continually has restrained our nation from the promising future of freedom that’s within grasp if only there’s the desire to join in combat to fight for freedom.
King appears to read the minds of his audience by rhetorically asking questions as he does in paragraph 12, “How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?” King proceeds,“The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust.” (para12). King retains his audience’s attention in justifying his ‘civil disobedience’ by elaborating on the issue of racial segregation and presenting evidence that encourages others to join him. This tactic of rhetorical questions is yet another technique of King’s clarifying that he has the utmost and “highest respect for the law.” (para16) King’s reasoning and probing serves to directly answer questions and accusations written within the letter of criticism that he received.
At this point, King instructs his audience exactly what actions and approaches should be taken, “Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform... into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.” These allusions and contrasting terminology serve to provoke citizens, promise of a greater future, and leave them with the vision King expresses so vividly. King’s dream lingers within the mind of the reader with a satisfactory feeling of being a part of something greater, something to be remembered for, something that will make a difference, and overall something that urges King’s audience to participate and support the movement of fighting for civil rights.
The narrative alludes countless times to The Bible, but later refers to numerous intellectual scholars and influential leaders, ethically earning his audience’s trust. King refers to past historic events such as the Boston Tea Party as being, “a massive act of civil disobedience.” (para17) but positively changing the course of history. Some actions and risks have to be taken with only the best intentions in mind. This is precisely what King is doing as an activist. King speaks of history being a potential guide to refer to while forming new history, rather than repeating similar mistakes again and again, continuing the eternal cycle without progression being made.
Such wisdom stated in a calm and persuasive tone of determination throughout King’s narrative thoroughly convinces the audience of his sincerity and good will. King skillfully expresses his view of segregation communicating with clarity the evident progress that has yet to take place. Segregation and civil rights are of great significance to King and are presented in a way that obligates his audience to take action as King ignites and evokes emotions for the conclusion of racial injustice.

Works Cited
King Jr., Martin L. "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Letter to Eight Clergymen in Alabama. 16 Apr. 1963. Why We Can't Wait. New York: New American Library, 1963. 64-84. African Studies Center. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 25 Jan. 2012. <htttp://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html>.
McGeeMadeline
January 28, 2012
AP Language & Composition
Block Four

“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” Analysis
Martin Luther King Jr. wrote an extensive reply to eight clergymen from Alabama in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in response to harsh criticism of his civil rights efforts. King establishes a cordial yet forcefully persuasive tone, urging his audience to “rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood,” (para9) and join him in pursuit of ending segregation.
King begins his letter, “My dear fellow clergymen... I feel that you are men of genuine good will... [and] your criticisms are sincerely set forth...”, (para1) preparing his audience to listen with open minds to his words of wisdom in a sincere and respectful introduction. He introduces himself, “as [the] president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference”, (para2) using ethical appeal, gradually assuring his ‘fellow clergymen’ of his credibility and trustworthiness. These statements characterize King as a noble, honest, God-driven activist, optimistic of a future of equality.
King proceeds to include one of his many Biblical references, “[as] Paul...carried the gospel of Jesus Christ...I am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom...Like Paul, I must constantly respond...for aid." (para3) reminding his audience of knowledge in his religious occupation and personifying himself as Paul himself. Paul was a Christian, an apostle, and a prophet in the New Testament who wrote letters from jail to his followers and to churches. The more Paul wrote, the more people respected and trusted him. Sound familiar? That’s precisely the intentions of King in incorporating these similarities in his letter to his followers of freedom, compelling them to move, “...with a sense of great urgency towards the promised land of racial justice.” (para24) This statement is in reference to Moses of Egypt, leading the Israelites [the Jews] to the promised land God provided for them. King portrays this biblical statement as equality being the state that God intended for our nation as a whole by including, “...let him march, let him make prayer pilgrimages... let him go.” (para24) not simply by coincidence, but pertaining to Moses’ creed in the Old Testament, “Let them [my people] go!” [Exodus 9:1 NIV] to exclaim his cause: “Let my people [African Americans] go!”, free from slavery. Such a substantial amount of Biblical statements implicates that The Word of the Lord is helping to wage King’s war and will withstand against any weaponry of slavery that is set against him.
In the twelfth paragraph, King provides a vivid analogy, “...for more than 340 years [we’ve waited] for our constitutional and God given rights...[the] nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jet-like speed... [yet] we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a a lunch counter.” (para12). This illustration emphasizes the dire need for progression in segregation, adding to King’s elaboration that the time for change has been greatly surpassed. King beckons his audience to join him in battle against prejudice as it continually has restrained our nation from the promising future of freedom that’s within grasp if only there’s the desire to join in combat to fight for freedom.
King appears to read the minds of his audience by rhetorically asking questions as he does in paragraph 12, “How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?” King proceeds,“The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust.” (para12). King retains his audience’s attention in justifying his ‘civil disobedience’ by elaborating on the issue of racial segregation and presenting evidence that encourages others to join him. This tactic of rhetorical questions is yet another technique of King’s clarifying that he has the utmost and “highest respect for the law.” (para16) King’s reasoning and probing serves to directly answer questions and accusations written within the letter of criticism that he received.
At this point, King instructs his audience exactly what actions and approaches should be taken, “Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform... into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.” These allusions and contrasting terminology serve to provoke citizens, promise of a greater future, and leave them with the vision King expresses so vividly. King’s dream lingers within the mind of the reader with a satisfactory feeling of being a part of something greater, something to be remembered for, something that will make a difference, and overall something that urges King’s audience to participate and support the movement of fighting for civil rights.
The narrative alludes countless times to The Bible, but later refers to numerous intellectual scholars and influential leaders, ethically earning his audience’s trust. King refers to past historic events such as the Boston Tea Party as being, “a massive act of civil disobedience.” (para17) but positively changing the course of history. Some actions and risks have to be taken with only the best intentions in mind. This is precisely what King is doing as an activist. King speaks of history being a potential guide to refer to while forming new history, rather than repeating similar mistakes again and again, continuing the eternal cycle without progression being made.
Such wisdom stated in a calm and persuasive tone of determination throughout King’s narrative thoroughly convinces the audience of his sincerity and good will. King skillfully expresses his view of segregation communicating with clarity the evident progress that has yet to take place. Segregation and civil rights are of great significance to King and are presented in a way that obligates his audience to take action as King ignites and evokes emotions for the conclusion of racial injustice.

Works Cited
King Jr., Martin L. "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Letter to Eight Clergymen in Alabama. 16 Apr. 1963. Why We Can't Wait. New York: New American Library, 1963. 64-84. African Studies Center. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 25 Jan. 2012. <htttp://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html>.
If the population
of human beings continues its trend in growing at this rate, then when will the world reach its mark of
122 billion people
?
Formula
Formula
Population [6.1 B]= n
Time [unknown]= t
Rate [1.4%]= r
2.72= e
n (t) = n e
r t
122
b
= 6.1
e
.014(
t
)
6.1 6.1
20 = e
ln
20 = .014
t
t
=
ln
20
.014
time
=
(cc) photo by theaucitron on Flickr
MORE
Jobs...
MORE

traffic...
MORE
pollution ...
MORE
trash and
dump sites...

MORE
Housing...
MORE

farms
for food...
MORE
water...
MORE
natural resources...
Effects of Overpopulation
The "Root" of the Problem
We're simply

the
IGNORING
China's law of one child per family sounds absurd, but it's rather rational.
STOP
START
Let's

ignoring the situation and

taking action.
So What's Next?
People panic ,
(
but only at first
)
and begin thinking , '
what if
'
the world
does
become overly populated
as they see the words :


appear at home , right there
on their T.V. screens ...
BREAKING NEWS : POPULATION REACHED
7 BILLION PEOPLE
Every few years , yet another landmark will be hit concerning the population .
Eventually though , the
"

7 Billion in World Population "
deal becomes old news , just as it did many times before when in 1999
the world hit 6 billion , or in 1987 when
5 billion was reached .
We're well aware

MORE
farms
don't just
'grow overnight'...
Preparations
have to start
being made...
It doesn't matter
how
we go about it, but ways
have

to be found to limit
the human population
or the human race
won't continue to
survive.
Population
Year
1B
1804
123 years
elapsed
1974
1960
1927
33 years
elapsed
14 years
elapsed
1999
1987
13 years
elapsed
12 years
elapsed
20_ _
2012
UNKNOWN
TIME
This may be a bit of a disturbing analogy but it is one that shows how imperative the situation is to tend to.

Many of you have probably heard of the show called 'Hoarders'. If you haven't then you're really in for a shocker. I'll show a quick clip of one episode that stands out from the rest in a minuete but first I'll summarize it for you. This episode is not simply trash, junk, and odds and ends here and there. The home is also infested... with cockroaches, black widows, and who knows what else.

When the daughter of the hoarder was asked how she deals with the bugs crawling about all over the place, she replied, " I simply pretend that they don't exist. I know they're there, but I ignore them. As I see one crawl across the counter, I'll just flick it away as if it were a june bug.







The purpose of this gruesome example was an anology.

The population of the Earth is growing, as we speak.

In the video, the family was aware of the growing problem and the infestation of cockroaches in the home. However, the ongoing issue was continually ignored and as time went on, the population of cockroaches and the amount of trash kept growing and growing and growing.

"Things started to accumulate..."
"By then it was too far gone for any one to fix."
"Things just started building up and piling up..."
"It got to the point where it is and it's really, really bad." {4:05}

In the same way, we are aware of the ongoing issue of over populating the planet with human inhabitants. However, we are'nt taking action and simply ignoring the situation. Meanwhile, we're standing by as the population grows, and grows, and grows some more.

The problem is becoming bigger...
POPULATION GROWTH 1800's - 2012
Do we build
Do we build
Do we build
and up?
and up
and up
that's the only way to build isn't it?
<
<
<
<
We could live on water, there's plenty of it - covering over of the earth.
But instead of building
UP
and instead of building
OUT
...
We could live in
outer space
as they did in the movie
WALLE
when the world was in detriment...
in spaceships
And that's only a few of the
MANY
things we'll need
MORE
of...
The population of the world in 2000 was
6.1 Billion
,
the estimated relative growth rate is
1.4% per year
. {based on the 2004 statistics}
The
EOPLE
2010
2005
1348-1350
Black Death
this is the last big dent in global population on record
Death Toll :
4 Million
1798
Small Pox Vaccine
Vaccination discovered, saving millions of lives
as a result ...
"Until disease , famine ,
or war reduces
the global population ,
it will continue to grow."
-Thomas
Malthus
This
INDIA
38 years (1952)
64 years (2011)
CHINA
41 years (1952)
73 years (2011)
Death Toll :
4 Million
This was the
last dent on the global population
in history .
"Population can
not
continue to soar."
-Malthus
Cities
became
safer
and more
sanitary
.
Black Death
1798
As Medication
spread
,
Population
.
Human waste
was
channeled away
from drinking
water.
Diseases
like cholera
and typhus
decreased

in quantity.
Along with this
discovery came
multiple other
antibotics.
The Small Pox
Vaccination was discovered saving

of lives .
Nutrition and
sanitary conditions were continually improving.
DOUBLED
VS
LANET
AUSTRALIA
47 years (1952)
84 years (2011)
1800's
Risks

were being
Reduced
.
P
P
UP?
UP?
Those who would've
died as children
are now living to
DEATH
RATE
B RTH
RATE
The global
Birth Rate
is gradually
spiraling
out of control and
growing
as we speak...
B RTH
RATE
B RTH
RATE
B RTH
RATE
BIRTH
RATE

The
Birth Rate
is greatly outweighing the
Death Rate
...
BIRTH
RATE

BIRTH
RATE

All this talk of living in

space

and on
water
sounds crazy,

but
...
at a rate of over

per year...
you could say that the
EOPLE
VS
LANET
P
P
problem isn't going too well on the
People
or
Planet's
side....
so let's face it,
The Earth's
NOT
going to take care of itself.
The is in hands...
W RLD
OUR
The is in hands...
These homes would help make up for the lack of land.
214 YEARS
14 years
elapsed
RIGHT
NOW
.
8O MILLION
2B
3B
4B
5B
6B
7B
?B
<
HAVE
POPULATION
2000
in
was
6.1
BILLION
with a growth rate of
1.4 %
the world
[based on 2004 statistics]
This trend will continue ,
soon reaching
122
BILLION
people ...
THE
>>
Math
Work
The
W RLD
hits another
BILLION...
and nothing is ever done to help solve the
problem
.
BREAKING NEWS
>>
becomes the
old news
every few years,
at first,
P
eople
anic,
P
>>
.014(
t
)
but soon the
+
MILLIONS
70%
214 YEARS
Effects of Overpopulation
REZI
ESENTATION
R
&
>>
PICTURE
BIG
1350
American Fact Finder. U.S. Census Bureau. Web. <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t>.
"The Black Death of 1348 to 1350." History Learning Site. Web. <http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/black_death_of_1348_to_1350.htm>.
Clark, Dorie. "Developed Nations May Be Paying People to Have Babies, but Having Fewer People Doesn’t Mean Having More Resources." The Portland Phoenix. 12 Apr. 2001. Web. <http://www.portlandphoenix.com/archive/features/01/04/13/feat_population.html>.
"Current U.S.A. Population." About.com Geography. About.com, 21 July 2011. Web. <http://geography.about.com/od/obtainpopulationdata/a/uspopulation.htm>.
"Life Expectancy - United States." Data 360. Web. <http://www.data360.org/dsg.aspx?Data_Set_Group_Id=195>.
"Life Expectancy Trends - Australia." Australian Bureau of Statistics. 28 June 2011. Web. <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4102.0Main Features10Mar 2011>.
"List of Countries by Life Expectancy." Wikipedia. 15 May 2012. Web. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_life_expectancy>.
"Overpopulation and Denial." Go11. Blogspot.com, 5 May 2011. Web. <http://go-11.blogspot.com/2011/05/overpopulation-and-denial.html>.
"Overpopulation Problems - Earth's Overpopulation Problems." Overpopulation Problems. Tribes of the Orange Sun. Web. <http://www.booksaboutthefuture.com/overpopulation-problems.htm>.
"Plague." National Geographic. Web. <http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/health-and-human-body/human-diseases/plague-article/>.
"Population Association of America: PAA Is a Non-profit, Scientific, Professional Organization That Promotes Research on Population Issues." Population Association of America. Web. <http://www.populationassociation.org/>.
Population in the U.S. - Google Public Data Explorer. Google. Web. 17 May 2012. <http://www.google.com/publicdata/explore?ds=kf7tgg1uo9ude_>.
"Sustainability, Carrying Capacity, Overcomsumption." World Population Awareness. Overpopulation.org, 25 Mar. 2012. Web. <http://www.overpopulation.org/solutions.html>.
TED: Ideas worth Spreading. Web. 17 May 2012. <http://www.ted.com/>.
"U.S. & World Population Clocks." U.S. & World Population Clocks. United States Census. Web. 17 May 2012. <http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html>.
W
C
orks
ited
American Fact Finder. U.S. Census Bureau. Web. <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t>.
"The Black Death of 1348 to 1350." History Learning Site. Web. <http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/black_death_of_1348_to_1350.htm>.
Clark, Dorie. "Developed Nations May Be Paying People to Have Babies, but Having Fewer People Doesn’t Mean Having More Resources." The Portland Phoenix. 12 Apr. 2001. Web. <http://www.portlandphoenix.com/archive/features/01/04/13/feat_population.html>.
"Current U.S.A. Population." About.com Geography. About.com, 21 July 2011. Web. <http://geography.about.com/od/obtainpopulationdata/a/uspopulation.htm>.
"Life Expectancy - United States." Data 360. Web. <http://www.data360.org/dsg.aspx?Data_Set_Group_Id=195>.
"Life Expectancy Trends - Australia." Australian Bureau of Statistics. 28 June 2011. Web. <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4102.0Main Features10Mar 2011>.
"List of Countries by Life Expectancy." Wikipedia. 15 May 2012. Web. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_life_expectancy>.
"Overpopulation and Denial." Go11. Blogspot.com, 5 May 2011. Web. <http://go-11.blogspot.com/2011/05/overpopulation-and-denial.html>.
"Overpopulation Problems - Earth's Overpopulation Problems." Overpopulation Problems. Tribes of the Orange Sun. Web. <http://www.booksaboutthefuture.com/overpopulation-problems.htm>.
"Plague." National Geographic. Web. <http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/health-and-human-body/human-diseases/plague-article/>.
"Population Association of America: PAA Is a Non-profit, Scientific, Professional Organization That Promotes Research on Population Issues." Population Association of America. Web. <http://www.populationassociation.org/>.
Population in the U.S. - Google Public Data Explorer. Google. Web. 17 May 2012. <http://www.google.com/publicdata/explore?ds=kf7tgg1uo9ude_>.
"Sustainability, Carrying Capacity, Overcomsumption." World Population Awareness. Overpopulation.org, 25 Mar. 2012. Web. <http://www.overpopulation.org/solutions.html>.
TED: Ideas worth Spreading. Web. 17 May 2012. <http://www.ted.com/>.
"U.S. & World Population Clocks." U.S. & World Population Clocks. United States Census. Web. 17 May 2012. <http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html>.
C
orks
ited
American Fact Finder. U.S. Census Bureau. Web. <http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t>.
"The Black Death of 1348 to 1350." History Learning Site. Web. <http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/black_death_of_1348_to_1350.htm>.
Clark, Dorie. "Developed Nations May Be Paying People to Have Babies, but Having Fewer People Doesn’t Mean Having More Resources." The Portland Phoenix. 12 Apr. 2001. Web. <http://www.portlandphoenix.com/archive/features/01/04/13/feat_population.html>.
"Current U.S.A. Population." About.com Geography. About.com, 21 July 2011. Web. <http://geography.about.com/od/obtainpopulationdata/a/uspopulation.htm>.
"Life Expectancy - United States." Data 360. Web. <http://www.data360.org/dsg.aspx?Data_Set_Group_Id=195>.
"Life Expectancy Trends - Australia." Australian Bureau of Statistics. 28 June 2011. Web. <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4102.0Main Features10Mar 2011>.
"List of Countries by Life Expectancy." Wikipedia. 15 May 2012. Web. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_life_expectancy>.
"Overpopulation and Denial." Go11. Blogspot.com, 5 May 2011. Web. <http://go-11.blogspot.com/2011/05/overpopulation-and-denial.html>.
"Overpopulation Problems - Earth's Overpopulation Problems." Overpopulation Problems. Tribes of the Orange Sun. Web. <http://www.booksaboutthefuture.com/overpopulation-problems.htm>.
"Plague." National Geographic. Web. <http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/health-and-human-body/human-diseases/plague-article/>.
"Population Association of America: PAA Is a Non-profit, Scientific, Professional Organization That Promotes Research on Population Issues." Population Association of America. Web. <http://www.populationassociation.org/>.
Population in the U.S. - Google Public Data Explorer. Google. Web. 17 May 2012. <http://www.google.com/publicdata/explore?ds=kf7tgg1uo9ude_>.
"Sustainability, Carrying Capacity, Overcomsumption." World Population Awareness. Overpopulation.org, 25 Mar. 2012. Web. <http://www.overpopulation.org/solutions.html>.
TED: Ideas worth Spreading. Web. 17 May 2012. <http://www.ted.com/>.
"U.S. & World Population Clocks." U.S. & World Population Clocks. United States Census. Web. 17 May 2012. <http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html>.
W
WHERE DO STAND
?
P
REZI
ESENTATION
R
This
is brought to you by
M
adeline
cGee
But it
DID
continue to soar...
SURGED
McGeeMadeline
January 28, 2012
AP Language & Composition
Block Four

“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” Analysis
Martin Luther King Jr. wrote an extensive reply to eight clergymen from Alabama in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in response to harsh criticism of his civil rights efforts. King establishes a cordial yet forcefully persuasive tone, urging his audience to “rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood,” (para9) and join him in pursuit of ending segregation.
King begins his letter, “My dear fellow clergymen... I feel that you are men of genuine good will... [and] your criticisms are sincerely set forth...”, (para1) preparing his audience to listen with open minds to his words of wisdom in a sincere and respectful introduction. He introduces himself, “as [the] president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference”, (para2) using ethical appeal, gradually assuring his ‘fellow clergymen’ of his credibility and trustworthiness. These statements characterize King as a noble, honest, God-driven activist, optimistic of a future of equality.
King proceeds to include one of his many Biblical references, “[as] Paul...carried the gospel of Jesus Christ...I am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom...Like Paul, I must constantly respond...for aid." (para3) reminding his audience of knowledge in his religious occupation and personifying himself as Paul himself. Paul was a Christian, an apostle, and a prophet in the New Testament who wrote letters from jail to his followers and to churches. The more Paul wrote, the more people respected and trusted him. Sound familiar? That’s precisely the intentions of King in incorporating these similarities in his letter to his followers of freedom, compelling them to move, “...with a sense of great urgency towards the promised land of racial justice.” (para24) This statement is in reference to Moses of Egypt, leading the Israelites [the Jews] to the promised land God provided for them. King portrays this biblical statement as equality being the state that God intended for our nation as a whole by including, “...let him march, let him make prayer pilgrimages... let him go.” (para24) not simply by coincidence, but pertaining to Moses’ creed in the Old Testament, “Let them [my people] go!” [Exodus 9:1 NIV] to exclaim his cause: “Let my people [African Americans] go!”, free from slavery. Such a substantial amount of Biblical statements implicates that The Word of the Lord is helping to wage King’s war and will withstand against any weaponry of slavery that is set against him.
In the twelfth paragraph, King provides a vivid analogy, “...for more than 340 years [we’ve waited] for our constitutional and God given rights...[the] nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jet-like speed... [yet] we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a a lunch counter.” (para12). This illustration emphasizes the dire need for progression in segregation, adding to King’s elaboration that the time for change has been greatly surpassed. King beckons his audience to join him in battle against prejudice as it continually has restrained our nation from the promising future of freedom that’s within grasp if only there’s the desire to join in combat to fight for freedom.
King appears to read the minds of his audience by rhetorically asking questions as he does in paragraph 12, “How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?” King proceeds,“The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust.” (para12). King retains his audience’s attention in justifying his ‘civil disobedience’ by elaborating on the issue of racial segregation and presenting evidence that encourages others to join him. This tactic of rhetorical questions is yet another technique of King’s clarifying that he has the utmost and “highest respect for the law.” (para16) King’s reasoning and probing serves to directly answer questions and accusations written within the letter of criticism that he received.
At this point, King instructs his audience exactly what actions and approaches should be taken, “Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform... into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.” These allusions and contrasting terminology serve to provoke citizens, promise of a greater future, and leave them with the vision King expresses so vividly. King’s dream lingers within the mind of the reader with a satisfactory feeling of being a part of something greater, something to be remembered for, something that will make a difference, and overall something that urges King’s audience to participate and support the movement of fighting for civil rights.
The narrative alludes countless times to The Bible, but later refers to numerous intellectual scholars and influential leaders, ethically earning his audience’s trust. King refers to past historic events such as the Boston Tea Party as being, “a massive act of civil disobedience.” (para17) but positively changing the course of history. Some actions and risks have to be taken with only the best intentions in mind. This is precisely what King is doing as an activist. King speaks of history being a potential guide to refer to while forming new history, rather than repeating similar mistakes again and again, continuing the eternal cycle without progression being made.
Such wisdom stated in a calm and persuasive tone of determination throughout King’s narrative thoroughly convinces the audience of his sincerity and good will. King skillfully expresses his view of segregation communicating with clarity the evident progress that has yet to take place. Segregation and civil rights are of great significance to King and are presented in a way that obligates his audience to take action as King ignites and evokes emotions for the conclusion of racial injustice.

Works Cited
King Jr., Martin L. "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Letter to Eight Clergymen in Alabama. 16 Apr. 1963. Why We Can't Wait. New York: New American Library, 1963. 64-84. African Studies Center. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 25 Jan. 2012. <htttp://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html>.
McGeeMadeline
January 28, 2012
AP Language & Composition
Block Four

“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” Analysis
Martin Luther King Jr. wrote an extensive reply to eight clergymen from Alabama in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in response to harsh criticism of his civil rights efforts. King establishes a cordial yet forcefully persuasive tone, urging his audience to “rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism to the majestic heights of understanding and brotherhood,” (para9) and join him in pursuit of ending segregation.
King begins his letter, “My dear fellow clergymen... I feel that you are men of genuine good will... [and] your criticisms are sincerely set forth...”, (para1) preparing his audience to listen with open minds to his words of wisdom in a sincere and respectful introduction. He introduces himself, “as [the] president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference”, (para2) using ethical appeal, gradually assuring his ‘fellow clergymen’ of his credibility and trustworthiness. These statements characterize King as a noble, honest, God-driven activist, optimistic of a future of equality.
King proceeds to include one of his many Biblical references, “[as] Paul...carried the gospel of Jesus Christ...I am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom...Like Paul, I must constantly respond...for aid." (para3) reminding his audience of knowledge in his religious occupation and personifying himself as Paul himself. Paul was a Christian, an apostle, and a prophet in the New Testament who wrote letters from jail to his followers and to churches. The more Paul wrote, the more people respected and trusted him. Sound familiar? That’s precisely the intentions of King in incorporating these similarities in his letter to his followers of freedom, compelling them to move, “...with a sense of great urgency towards the promised land of racial justice.” (para24) This statement is in reference to Moses of Egypt, leading the Israelites [the Jews] to the promised land God provided for them. King portrays this biblical statement as equality being the state that God intended for our nation as a whole by including, “...let him march, let him make prayer pilgrimages... let him go.” (para24) not simply by coincidence, but pertaining to Moses’ creed in the Old Testament, “Let them [my people] go!” [Exodus 9:1 NIV] to exclaim his cause: “Let my people [African Americans] go!”, free from slavery. Such a substantial amount of Biblical statements implicates that The Word of the Lord is helping to wage King’s war and will withstand against any weaponry of slavery that is set against him.
In the twelfth paragraph, King provides a vivid analogy, “...for more than 340 years [we’ve waited] for our constitutional and God given rights...[the] nations of Asia and Africa are moving with jet-like speed... [yet] we still creep at horse and buggy pace toward gaining a cup of coffee at a a lunch counter.” (para12). This illustration emphasizes the dire need for progression in segregation, adding to King’s elaboration that the time for change has been greatly surpassed. King beckons his audience to join him in battle against prejudice as it continually has restrained our nation from the promising future of freedom that’s within grasp if only there’s the desire to join in combat to fight for freedom.
King appears to read the minds of his audience by rhetorically asking questions as he does in paragraph 12, “How can you advocate breaking some laws and obeying others?” King proceeds,“The answer lies in the fact that there are two types of laws: just and unjust.” (para12). King retains his audience’s attention in justifying his ‘civil disobedience’ by elaborating on the issue of racial segregation and presenting evidence that encourages others to join him. This tactic of rhetorical questions is yet another technique of King’s clarifying that he has the utmost and “highest respect for the law.” (para16) King’s reasoning and probing serves to directly answer questions and accusations written within the letter of criticism that he received.
At this point, King instructs his audience exactly what actions and approaches should be taken, “Now is the time to make real the promise of democracy and transform... into a creative psalm of brotherhood. Now is the time to lift our national policy from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of human dignity.” These allusions and contrasting terminology serve to provoke citizens, promise of a greater future, and leave them with the vision King expresses so vividly. King’s dream lingers within the mind of the reader with a satisfactory feeling of being a part of something greater, something to be remembered for, something that will make a difference, and overall something that urges King’s audience to participate and support the movement of fighting for civil rights.
The narrative alludes countless times to The Bible, but later refers to numerous intellectual scholars and influential leaders, ethically earning his audience’s trust. King refers to past historic events such as the Boston Tea Party as being, “a massive act of civil disobedience.” (para17) but positively changing the course of history. Some actions and risks have to be taken with only the best intentions in mind. This is precisely what King is doing as an activist. King speaks of history being a potential guide to refer to while forming new history, rather than repeating similar mistakes again and again, continuing the eternal cycle without progression being made.
Such wisdom stated in a calm and persuasive tone of determination throughout King’s narrative thoroughly convinces the audience of his sincerity and good will. King skillfully expresses his view of segregation communicating with clarity the evident progress that has yet to take place. Segregation and civil rights are of great significance to King and are presented in a way that obligates his audience to take action as King ignites and evokes emotions for the conclusion of racial injustice.

Works Cited
King Jr., Martin L. "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." Letter to Eight Clergymen in Alabama. 16 Apr. 1963. Why We Can't Wait. New York: New American Library, 1963. 64-84. African Studies Center. University of Pennsylvania. Web. 25 Jan. 2012. <htttp://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html>.
the L ife
Expectancy .
CHILDREN
.
BILLIONS
Full transcript