Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Catcher In the Rye-Writing the Essay

No description
by

Richard Kreinbring

on 5 May 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Catcher In the Rye-Writing the Essay







WNB-look at your evidence and claim and pick paragraph types that work to support your claim.
Catcher In The Rye Literary Essay
Write an analysis of the novel that examines a single theme.
it will be 3 paragraphs long and must incorporate the following:
Thesis Paragraph

Required
2 Body Paragraphs
Your choice of the following types:
Summary Example
(I will show you this one in class)
Extended Example
Connected Example
Literary Device
All of these are in your writer’s notebook
You should proceed in the following order--again this is what we worked on all semester and should be in your notebook.
The Process
The Assignment
the struggle to grow up (whatever you think that means)
struggle to find a purpose
salvation-can we save each other?
preserving innocence as you grow up
preserving indelible important moments-what role do they serve?
I. Develop a Claim
On one level Catcher In The Rye is about...(plot)
but on a deeper level it is about...(theme).
recognizing that you can not save innocence
finding something “gold” in a jaded world
accepting death of a loved one
alienation (doing it to ourselves or how others do it to us)
Possible themes include:
These are not the only themes available. You are encouraged to come up with your own.
You have collected bookmarks and examples throughout your WNB. Now you need to organize it in a way that helps you organize your essay to best support your claim.
II. Collect Evidence
Write a 10 sentence summary of the plot picking details that point towards your claim.
III. Summary
This is in your WNB.
IV. Write your Thesis Paragraph.
VI. Write the Body Paragraphs
Reread the last chapter looking for insights and “aha moments.”
Write the conclusion.
V. Decide What Paragraph Types to Use
VII. Conclusion
Review Materials:
Look here if you need help with the different types of paragraphs.
Whi
ch examples seem connected to one another and make a key point to prove the claim? You will need to find at least two examples that connect to one another.

Literary Device-
Which
examples includes a purposeful use of a literary device? The device may be found multiple times across the novel, or it might be found at a key turning point.
Extended Example-
Which piece of evidence is a turning point or a key internal event for the character? This example will likely be your first body paragraph (if you use this type) since it is probably the most important example to support your claim.

Summary-
W
hich examples show how the character changes or deals with conflict? You will need to find at least two examples that illustrate this. These examples give the reader the gist of the character.

Read this.
Your Essay is Due tomorrow.
Today you have time in here to work on your essay. Don't waste it. We will not be back.
Start by making a new document in your Google.docs account. Give it the title
Catcher Essay Draft and your name
. Share it with me richard.kreinbring@avondaleschools.org

You should be ready to write the whole essay from the drafts you have in you WNB. Go ahead and do that, but keep in mind that what you're putting onto the computer is still a draft. Make changes as you go along. Fix things. Ask someone to read it. Make sure you are following the model from your WNB.

Your final essay will be 5 paragraphs long. You need to decide which body paragraphs you want to use. Be prepared to explain that choice-Metacog Baby!
A text reference (so you will need your book!)
Plot summary- not the WHOLE summary, only the important parts. This should be 3-5 sentences long
A transition that moves from the basis plot. summary towards the deeper meaning of the book. 2-3 Sentences.
Claim or Thesis Statement- what YOU believe is the meaning of the story. Make sure it is not a cliche.
Evidence- what you will use to prove the claim is true. You will also use this for your content.
A Thesis Paragraph has all of the following parts-
maybe more.
If you'd like to be able to see this Prezi, search for this:
Catcher In the Rye-Writing The essay

Take A "Color Coding" Worksheet.
Read It-We'll talk about it in a minute
Literary essayists use multiple types of body paragraphs to support their claims. One type is the CONNECTED EXAMPLE body paragraph.

2. Use ex
act words f
rom the text to support the claim.
*
Y
ou should have 2 or 3
quotes,
embedded with your own words and cited in MLA style.

3. Determine the relationship of the examples: Either comp
arison/contrast or
caus
e/effect.
*
Use transitional words to connect the examples and/or indicate the sequence of the events.
3. Briefly
summarize the context for each moment
in the sequence of the story.
*The context should be discussed after before or after each quote. •
4. Explain (
interpret/warrant)
how the line(s) connect to each other and support the claim.
*The Warrant is like your commentary on the how the quote supports your claim.
5. End with a concluding sentence that
echoes or repeats words
from your topic sentence.
1. Write a
topic sentence
that
connects three (3) events/details from across
the text that support the claim.
*Across text means that you find examples from the beginning, middle, and end that connect.
*Look for moments that show how
the characters change or the story shifts
.
Wait, Wait. what's a
topic sentence
again?

A topic sentence identifies the main idea of the paragraph. It also states the point the writer wishes to make about that subject.

Generally, the topic sentence appears at the beginning of the paragraph. It is often the paragraph’s very first sentence. A paragraph’s topic sentence should work in
two directions
. It should
connect to you thesis
, and give your reader
an idea about what the paragraph will be about.
Paragraph Types and How to Write them
CONNECTED EXAMPLE



Connected Examples (CE)
- Which examples seem connected to one another and make a key point to prove the claim? You will need to find at least two examples that connect to one another.
Extended Example (EE)
- Which piece of evidence is a
turning point or a key internal event
for the character? This example will likely be in your
first body paragraph
since it is probably the most important example to support your claim.
Paragraph Types That You Will Use
Literary Device (LD)-
Which example(s) includes a purposeful use of a literary device? The device may be found multiple times across the novel, or it might be found at a key turning point.
Summary (S)-
Which examples show how the character changes or deals with conflict? You will need to find at least two examples that demonstrate this. These examples give the reader the gist of the character.
Since your body paragraphs will be organized in order or importance, choose transition words from the following list to be included in your topic sentences:
additionally
again
also
as well
besides
equally important
further
furthermore
in addition
moreover
then
Session 5/6
Topic Sentence Transitions
The Extended Example Body Paragraph
In Session 5 you made decisions about which types of paragraphs you wanted to use and the order that best fit them to support your claims. In Session 6 you will learn how to write an extended body paragraph the uses your chosen evidence.
Literary essayists use multiple types of body paragraphs to support their claims. One type is the Extended Example body paragraph.
1. Read the paragraph types.
2. Now look at your quotes/examples.
3. In the Paragraph Type column, write in the paragraph type.
Next:
Rank your examples with a partner. Which example/quote is MOST important? Consider your types of paragraphs and where they will fall in the body of your paper when ranking. Start with #1 being
MOST
important and on from there.
*We won't be using this one!*
Session 7
Summary Body Paragraph
Literary essayists use multiple types of body paragraphs to support their claim. One type is the summary body paragraph.
Step 1-
Write a topic sentence that identifies either how the CHARACTER CHANGES or DEALS WITH CONFLICT
over the course of the novel
in order to
support the claim
.
Step 2-
Summarize the events;
don't be vague
--think about how you might write this paragraph on a final exam, if you did not have your book to provide evidence.
Step 3-
Connect the summaries with time-order transitions to indicate the sequence of the events.
Step 4-
Explain (interpret) how the list of events connect to each other and support the claim.
Examples of Time-Order Transitions:

First...
Initially...
Next....
Then...
Finally...
After...
Before...
Previously...
Lastly...
Exchange Extended Example (EE) Paragraphs with a partner.

Read it through once.

Read it through a second time.
Label/Highlight the parts we talked about yesterday. If you can't find a part make a note of that.
Session 6

Write your claim on the top of the Extended Example and label the paragraph "EE."
Copy this in your WNB
or see handout
This is NOT a "general" summary; this summary should be specific to your claim and support it.
Order of Your Paper1. Thesis Paragraph2. Extended Example Body Paragraph3. Summary Body Paragraph4. Connected Example Body Paragraph5. Conclusion
Step Fi
ve: Repeat key words from the topic (or opening) sentence to connect and explain the important moment. What does this moment show?
EXTENDED EXAMPLE PARAGRAPH
TURN AND TALK: Editing

Does your partner's extended example paragraph do these things?
1. Topic sentence to introduce the most important moment in the story that supports claim.
2. Set up the quote by putting it in context. Embed the quote with your own words and cite PAGE NUMBER in MLA style!
3. Summarize what happened in the quote
4. Connect this quote to your claim. This is interpreting/warranting. This shows your thinking!
5. Connect to topic sentence to explain the important moment--keep it connected to overall claim!
Claim:Steinbeck uses Curley's anger and temper to show that significant others influence the choices we make.

When Curley threatens Lennie in the bunkhouse, he is displaying behavior that has been influenced by his new marriage. Candy explains to Lennie that Curley has become "worse lately…He got married a couple of weeks ago. Seems like Curley is cockier’n ever since he got married” (Steinbeck 47). Candy confides in George and Lennie that Curley has not always been so ill-tempered but now that he has a wife, he has become increasingly angry and hot-headed. Though Steinbeck never writes about Curley’s past, he shows us that after Curley settles down, he chooses to interact with the men on the ranch differently. Candy’s explanation of Curley’s temper shows how Curley's behavior has changed since his marriage.
EE Model: Of Mice and Men
Step One:
Write a topic sentence that
identifies the key turning point for the character (best example) that supports your claim.
Quickly describe the quote you are about to state. *This should not be a statement about plot; rather, a topic sentence is directly connected to your claim (which is arguable) and tells the reader what the paragraph is about.
Step Two
: Use exact words from the text: add your quote as the next sentence.

*Embed the quote with your own words, in your own sentence. Don't just "plop" the quote into the paragraph.*Cite in MLA style: "Blah, blah, blah" (34).
Step Thre
e: Briefly summarize the context for this moment in the sequence of the story. Where does this quote happen in the story? What is happening at this moment?
Step Fou
r: Explain (interp
ret/warr
ant) how the line is connected to other details in the moment to illustrate the claim. How does what is happening in this moment and quote tie into your claim?
Exchange your rough drafts with anther person.
Read it and, using your notes, find and label all of the parts that should be present in the paragraph.

Talk to the person about the draft.
What's missing?
Use these phrases:
I like how you...
I'd like to see more...
Can you develop/extended/ explain...better by...

Peer Edit and Review
Show me your WNB. You have to have first drafts of all of the paragraph types written out before you can start on the next draft.
At the end of the period make sure I have a copy of your work so I can give you credit for what you did.

You need to bring in a hard copy of the draft you want to turn in to class tomorrow.

You will be asked to find and label all of the parts of your paragraphs.
Writers Workshop
From WNB to the Cloud
(or Computer, but that's so, like, 20th Century.)
Final Review Process
Get out a hard copy of your Catcher essay.

Use the worksheet to help you check that you have all of the parts of the essay. Remember, you'll also be evaluated on how well written it is. Just because all the parts are there doesn't mean it's a great essay, but it gives you a much better chance.
If you're satisfied with the essay, sure it's an A, turn it in at the end of the hour.
If you think you'd like to work it over on more time, keep it until tomorrow. If you chose to wait, both copies of the essay need to be highlighted and you'll need another worksheet. Turn everything in tomorrow.
Show your highlighted essay to a trusted classmate and have her read it. She needs to make suggestions and sign the bottom of the worksheet.
In order to write a Summary body paragraph:

• Write a
topic sentence
that identifies either how the character
changes over the course of the novel or deals with conflict over the course of the novel in order to support the claim.

• Summarize the events showing the evolution of the character or the conflict.

• Connect the summaries with
time-order transitions
to indicate the sequence of the events.

• Explain (interpret/warrant) how the list of events connect to each other and support the claim.

SUMMARY PARAGRAPH
• A topic sentence that identifies a choice the writer makes in his/her writing (e.g., use of motifs, symbols, repetition, metaphors, similes, flashbacks) that supports the claim.
• Use exact words from the text that are examples of this choice.
• Repeat key words from the topic sentence to connect and explain the writer’s choice

Literary Device Paragraph
Full transcript