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Black Law's and Rights

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by

Ian Magee

on 27 April 2010

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Transcript of Black Law's and Rights

Black Rights and Their Laws The Black's Have Been Through Thin and today I'll be showing you the affects that that had and how it was resolved The Blacks Laws Have Never Been fully justified For many reasons one of them being the fact that the Americans and other slave driven countries wanted slaves that would not rebel aginst. And everyone knew that if a slave couldent read laws then a slave couldnt justifi laws. he African-American Civil Rights Movement 1955–1968 refers to the movements in the United States aimed at get rid of racial discrimination against African Americans and restoring Suffrage in some of the states. Before the Civil War the United States Constitution did not provide specific protections for voting. Qualifications for voting were matters which neither the Constitution nor federal laws governed. At that time, although a few northern states permitted a small number of free black men to register and vote, slavery and restrictive state laws and practices led the franchise to be exercised almost exclusively by white males.

Shortly after the end of the Civil War Congress enacted the Military Reconstruction Act of 1867, which allowed former Confederate States to be readmitted to the Union if they adopted new state constitutions that permitted universal male suffrage. The 14th Amendment, which conferred citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States, was ratified in 1868.

In 1870 the 15th Amendment was ratified, which provided specifically that the right to vote shall not be denied or abridged on the basis of race, color or previous condition of servitude. This superseded state laws that had directly prohibited black voting. Congress then enacted the Enforcement Act of 1870, which contained criminal penalties for interference with the right to vote, and the Force Act of 1871, which provided for federal election oversight.

As a result, in the former Confederate States, where new black citizens in some cases comprised outright or near majorities of the eligible voting population, hundreds of thousands -- perhaps one million -- recently-freed slaves registered to vote. Black candidates began for the first time to be elected to state, local and federal offices and to play a meaningful role in their g
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