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Sparta vs Athens

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Lauren Kennedy

on 29 February 2016

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Transcript of Sparta vs Athens

Suggested Lesson Sequence:
Present the PowerPoint on Sparta and Athens and have the student take notes from the green boxes in their note-taking graphic organizers.
Have the students use the Venn Diagram to further analyze the similarities and differences between Athens and Sparta.
Have the students read the handouts on Athens and Sparta to generate detailed notes for the graphic organizers for each city state.
Present the essay question to the students as a culminating activity for the mini-lesson. Review the process for writing an A+ essay.
Have the students write the essay comparing and contrasting Athens with Sparta. Important! Slides 49-51 should be printed as “landscape” under the design ribbon above under slide orientation! Important! Slides 41-48 should be printed as “portrait” under the design ribbon above under slide orientation! Note! The following slides are the student reproducibles for this mini- lesson! Democratic Athens Totalitarian Sparta In sharp contrast to Athens was its rival Sparta. Sparta had not joined the other Greek cities in trade and colonization but had expanded instead by conquering and enslaving its neighbors. To guard against revolts by the state slaves (helots), who worked the land for their conquerors, Sparta deviated from the normal course of Greek political development and transformed itself into a militaristic totalitarian state.
To this end, the state enforced absolute subordination of the individual to its will. State officials examined all newborn children, and any found sickly or deformed were abandoned to die. Spartan society In ancient Sparta, boys at aged seven years old left their homes and entered the public educational system to devote the rest of their lives to the state. The goal of this system of education was to produce a well-drilled military machine composed of soldiers who were "obedient to the word of command, capable of enduring hardships and victories in battle."

The Spartan system of education was organized by the state and each boy was assigned to a group known as the agela. They lived in a communal style and were made to undergo a curriculum of training that was rigorous and often painful. Enormous discipline was placed on these children as they passed through the hands of teachers, gymnastic coaches and military instructors. The goal of this program was to produce men who were not only physically fit but psychologically disciplined. The Spartan male's education did not end till he reached the age of thirty. In this educational regime, literacy and the arts were not a priority. When they reached the age of eleven, Spartan boys were moved up to the next level of their education.

Sparta's position in the ancient Greek world was that of the lead member of the Peloponnesian league. Through most of it's existence, Sparta was engaged in wars with various states including Persia. By the 6th century BC Sparta was engaged in military excursions in Greece and as well as Asia Minor. The militaristic culture of Sparta fostered values which emphasized the production of "strong, violent, disciplined, unquestioning and ruthless young men, and more or less similar young women" They "prided themselves on brute strength, courage and brevity of speech," and even their religious festivals were characterized by violent competitions where, though unarmed, young men were known to be flogged to the point of unconsciousness, and gangs of youths went at each other with no holds barred. 3. Parthenon – most famous Greek building Art & Architecture Greek “Cultural” Unity 2. Greek alphabet. G0lden Age of athens 3. _________ – most ______ Greek building Art & architecture: 2. ________ art – portray the ____ in _______ form. 1. Desired ______ & _______ in their artwork. Mini-Unit Athens vs. Sparta balance beauty Art & Architecture 1. Desired beauty & balance in their artwork. SPARTA Athens Venn diagram: Athens v. Sparta Name:________________________________ 3. Parthenon – most famous Greek building Art & Architecture mathematics science Art & architecture literature Philosophy Golden age of athens Use the Readings, Your Packet and Your Knowledge of Ancient Greece to Complete the Graphic Organizer! Describe the Duties of a Citizen in Athenian Society :

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______________________________ Describe the Values That Were Important in Athenian Society:

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______________________________ Describe and Give Specific Details About the Type of Government that Existed in Ancient Athens:
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____________________________________________________________________________________________ Athenian society Describe the Accomplishments of Athenian Society:

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______________________________ Athens was the intellectual center of Greece. It was one of the first city-states of its time, and is still world renowned as one of the most famous cities in the world. It was named after Athena, the goddess of wisdom and the city's patron

In the year 507 B.C., the Athenian leader Cleisthenes introduced a system of political reforms that he called demokratia, or “rule by the people.” Although this Athenian democracy would survive for only two centuries, Cleisthenes’ invention was one of ancient Athen’s most enduring contributions to the modern world. In 508 BC, Athens became one of the first societies in ancient times to formally establish a democracy. This form of government was used at a meeting place which the Athenians called the Assembly. Here the citizens of Athens met monthly and discussed the affairs of state. There were no decisions made by government without first asking the Assembly. Athenian society Reading History EYES ON TEXT The ancient Athenians were a unique people. They believed that individuals should be free as long as they acted within the laws of Athens. This allowed them the opportunity to excel in any direction they chose. Individuality, as the Athenians viewed it, was the basis of their society. The ability to strive for excellence, no matter what the challenge, was what the Athenians so dearly believed in. This strive for excellence was the method from which they achieved such phenomenal accomplishments. These accomplishments astound us to this day. They also believed in the balance of mind and body. Although many of them strove to become soldiers and athletes, others ventured into philosophy, drama, pottery and the arts. The two most important concepts which the ancient Athenians followed were found inscribed on the great shrine of Delphi, which read "Nothing in excess" and "Know thyself". This philosophy greatly impacted Athenian society. perfect body Lifelike Art & Architecture 2. Lifelike art – portray the body in perfect form. Greek “Cultural” Unity The Persians 4. Fear of the Persian Empire. food shortages Athens Vs. Sparta Use the Readings, Your Packet and Your Knowledge of Ancient Greece to Complete the Graphic Organizer! Describe the Duties of a Citizen in Spartan Society :

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______________________________ Describe the Values That Were Important in Spartan Society:

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______________________________ Describe and Give Specific Details About the Type of Government that Existed in Ancient Sparta:
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_____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Spartan society Describe the Accomplishments of Spartan Society:

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______________________________ The Iliad Troy Helen freedom control strict all regulates Totalitarianism 3. Totalitarianism – government regulates all aspects of society: (Strict government control = no personal freedom) Totalitarian Sparta “Spartans are willing to die for their city because they have no reason to live.” – Non-Spartan
- power glorification Militarism Totalitarian Sparta 2. Militarism – the glorification of military power. soldiers all society Warrior Totalitarian Sparta 1. Warrior society (all resources go into training soldiers). famous Parthenon Art & Architecture Lincoln Memorial 3. Parthenon – most famous Greek building mind human religious worldly Humanism Humanism – focus on worldly rather than religious subjects and the potential of the human mind. 776 B.C. - 393 A.D. Greek “Cultural” Unity 3. The Olympic Games. 508 B.C. democracy Athens United States 1776 England 1600’s 1. Ancient Athens = 1st Democracy in history! 4. 3. 2. 1. Greek “Cultural” unity Strive For an A+ This part is a final check list for you to use to make sure that you have done everything you need to get a 5! Finish with a good conclusion. Restate the theme of the essay and add your own final original thoughts/opinion on the topic! This part tells you what you need to do in the body paragraphs! Be the Historian on this part of the essay. Load up your paragraphs with as much historical detail as possible. This information can be weaved into your introduction but your intro cannot be copied word for word! It must be original! Formal Writing! Introduction, Body Paragraphs and a Conclusion! humanism genius Multifaceted genius (symbolic of the spirit of humanism). Ethics
Government
Metaphysics
Politics
Psychology
Rhetoric
Poetry
Mathematics Anatomy
Astronomy
Embryology
Physics
Zoology
Philosophy
Aesthetics
Economics Aristotle rule educated wisest The wisest and most educated individuals should rule society (anti-democratic). socrates Plato “Man is of all animals the most divine and most civilized; but if he be ill-educated he is the most savage of earthly creatures.”
-Plato Plato Method truth reason questioning logical Be skeptical question everything and seek the truth! “The unexamined life is not worth living”
-Socrates 1. Use logical questioning and reason to seek the truth (Socratic Method). Socrates Democracy To Rule Kratos = people Demos = Iliad Odyssey Homer 2. Homer – Wrote the epic poems the Odyssey & the Iliad. 300 Spartans at 300
spartans 480 B.C. 300,000
Persians Thermopylae 480 B.C. The Battlefield today Military
skills murder Ignore
pain Physical
abuse Kept
hungry Military school age 7 Chosen
to live Spartan military training world reason observation thinkers Philosophy Greek Philosophy
Inquiring Minds ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Philosophy Greek thinkers used observation & reason to understand the world around them. Idiotes! ________ – leader during Athens ___________
(civilization’s ____). 3. _______ Democracy: Only ___ could ___________; not women or slaves. ______ Democracy – government in which
____ citizens participate ________ rather than
through _______ _______________. 1. Ancient ______ = 1st _________ in history! Athens vs. Sparta 2. __________ – the _____________ of military _____. 1. _______ _______ (___ resources go into training ________). Sparta: athens: 3. _______________ – government _________ ___ aspects of society: (______ government _______ =
no personal _______) Polythe-istic Military Training For Boys Trade & Travel Not Allowed Limited Direct Democracy Girls Trained to be Mothers of Soldiers Only Male Citizens Could Vote Trade With Other City-States Olympic Games Laws Made by an Assembly Common Language Monarchy With Two Kings Women Obey Men Military Society comedy tragedy tRAGEDY cOMEDY 1. Theater, plays and the literary themes of tragedy & comedy. Literature peak golden age Pericles “We alone regard a man who takes no interest in public affairs, not as a harmless but as a useless character.” Education Ability Equality Idiotes 4. Pericles – leader during Athens golden age (civilization’s peak). “Our constitution is called a democracy because power is in the hands not of a minority but of the whole people. When it is a question of settling private disputes, everyone is equal before the laws. When it is a question of putting one person before another in positions of public responsibility, what counts is not membership of a particular class, but the ability the man possesses. We alone regard a man who takes no interest in public affairs, not as a harmless but as a useless character.”
-Pericles Athenian Democracy ideas radical death The death of socrates 2. Tried and sentenced to death for promoting radical ideas and challenging the government of Athens. I shall carry out the death sentence myself! participate men Limited “The loom is women’s work, not debate. The man is by nature fitter for command than the female, just as an older person is superior to a younger, more immature person.
-Aristotle Aristotle 3. Limited Democracy: Only men could participate; not women or slaves. Right on Bro! It’s a man’s world you know! Socrates 2. Tried and sentenced to _____ for promoting _______ _____ and challenging the government of Athens. Literature: Aristotle Plato Greek Philosophy: 1. Use _______ ___________ and ______ to seek the _____ (Socratic ______). 2. _____ – Wrote the epic poems the _______ & the _____. 1. Theater, plays and the literary themes of _______ & ______. Multifaceted ______ (symbolic of the spirit of ________). The ______ and most ________ individuals should ____ society (anti-democratic). ________ – focus on _______ rather than _________ subjects and the potential of the _____ ____. __________ Greek ________ used ___________ & ______ to understand the _____ around them. G0lden Age of athens Greek “Cultural” Unity Apollo Poseidon aphrodite athena Hera zeus 1. Worshipped the same gods. The Odyssey This form of culture had its roots in the ancient Greek city-state of
Sparta!!
a form of government that uses force and power to rule a people.
Totalitarianism
all of whom became warriors Spartan males taught to be fit, brave and patriotic Females Helots Slaves Groups Three Within Sparta there existed Newborn males judged to be weak were left to die of exposure
at age 7, boys left home to live in barracks and receive military training from older boys.
The Helots provided the necessary food and labor for Spartan males and females. Boys went barefoot,
wore minimal clothing,
practiced all forms of athletics,
and received military instruction
They married at age 20 but continued to live in the barracks
Athenians eventually abolished slavery and developed a direct democracy where citizens chose the members of the powerful Assembly. were not allowed citizenship Democracy Athenian youth were encouraged to develop artistic and intellectual talents to such a degree that historians refer to their developments in the arts as the "golden Age" however, Slaves and women, All citizens were equal before the law and participated in the government. all citizens participated in governmental activities. In Athens, people government by the What’s wrong with this picture?
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