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Theme: Nature

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by

Marimar Mateo

on 21 February 2016

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Transcript of Theme: Nature

Theme: Nature

Theme:Nature
Page 7
Spring, the sweet spring, is the year's pleasant king,
Then blooms each thing, then maids dance in a ring,
Cold doth not sting, the pretty birds do sing:
Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-wee, to-witta-woo!

The palm and may make country houses gay,
Lambs frisk and play, the shepherds pipe all day,
And we hear aye birds tune this merry lay:
Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-wee, to-witta-woo!

The fields breathe sweet, the daisies kiss our feet,
Youngs lovers meet, old wives a-sunning sit.
In every street these tunes our ears do greet:
Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-wee, to-witta-woo!
Spring, the sweet spring!
"The Processions of The Seasons"
Edmund Spenser
So forth issued the season of the year.
First, lusty Spring, all dight in leaves of flowers
That freshly budded and new blooms did bear,
In which a thousand birds had built their bowers
That sweetly sung to call forth paramours,
And in his head, as fit for warlike stours,
A gilt-engraven morion he did wear ,
That, as some did him love, so others did him fear.

Then came the jolly Summer, being dight
In a thin silken cassock coloured green
That was unlined all, to be more light,
And on his head a garland well beseen
He wore, from which as he had chafed been
Thee sweat did drop; and in his hand he bore
A bow and shafts, as he in forest green
Had hunted late the leopard or the boar
And now would bathe his limbs, with labour heated sore.
Theme:Nature
Page 16
Then came the Autumn all in yellow clad
As though he joyed in his plenteous store,
Laden with fruits that made him laugh, full glad
That he had banished hunger, which to fore
Had by the belly oft him pinched sore;
Upon his head a wreath, that was enrolled
With ears of corn of every sort, he bore,
And in his hand a sickle he did hold
To reap the ripended fruits the which the earth had yold

Lastly came Winter clothed all in frieze,
Chattering his teeth for cold that did him chill,
Whilst on his hoary beard his breath did freeze;
And the dull drops that from his purpled bill,
As from a limbeck, did adown distil.
In his right hand a tipped staff he held
With which his feeble steps he stayed still,
For he was faint with cold and weak with eld
That scarce his loosed limbs he able was to wield.


"Song: Spring, The Sweet Spring"
Thomas Nashe
"From Underwoods"
Ben Jonson
Theme: Nature
Page 11
It is not growing like a tree
In bulk, doth make man better be,
Or standing long an oak, three hundred year,
To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere:
A lily of a day
Is fairer far in May
Although it fall and die that night;
It was the plant and flower of light.
In small proportions we just beauties see,
And in short measures life may perfect be.
Summary of Poem
Speaker and Subject
Theme: Nature
Page:7
Theme: Nature
Page:7
Structure
Style
Theme:Nature Page 16
When Sweet Spring comes, joy radiates from all
the surroundings. The end of the cold season and death, welcomes the arrival of warmth and opportunities for "young lovers [who] meet." Their happiness and new beginning is shown after they meet when "the fields breathe sweet [and] the daisies kiss [their] feet."
Rhyme Scheme:

AAAB CCCB DDDBE this represents a more joyful and soothing mood through out the poem.
Punctuation
:

The appliance of commas, exclamation points, and colons allow the reader to slowly read the poem and capture his mood.
Repetition:
At the end of each stanza he repeats the sounds of birds when they sing. This helps one imagine the surroundings and hear the music.
Spring, the sweet spring
,
is the year's pleasant
king
,
Then blooms each thing
,
then maids dance in a
ring
,
Cold doth not sting
,
the pretty birds do
sing
:

Cuckoo
,
jug-jug
,
pu-wee
,
to-witta-
woo
!

The palm and may make country houses
gay
,
Lambs frisk and play
,
the shepherds pipe all
day
,
And we hear aye birds tune this merry
lay
:
Cuckoo
,
jug-jug
,
pu-wee
,
to-witta-
woo
!

The fields breathe sweet
,
the daisies kiss our
feet
,
Young lovers meet
,
old wives a- sunning
sit
,
In every street these tunes our ears to
greet
:
Cuckoo
,
jug-jug
,
pu-wee
,
to-witta-
woo
!
Spring, the sweet spring
!
Personification:
The human characteristics that are applied to the flowers represent the pleasure that spring brings the speaker and the others around him.

Imagery/Sensory Details:
Sensory details allows readers to visualize, hear, and even smell the season approaching by the details that are included in the poem. This reels the readers in and makes them feel as if they are actually there.

Symbolism
: This demonstrates the conclusion of the frost season that brings forth death and the inauguration of spring which favors warmth and life.

The Power of Nature
Theme:Nature
Page 7
Theme: Nature
Page 7
Theme:Nature
Page 7
Summary of Poem
Theme: Nature
Page 11
Speaker and Subject
Structure
Theme: Nature
Page 11
Style
Theme: Nature
Page 11
Tone/ Word Choice
Theme: Nature
Page 11
Summary of Poem
Theme: Nature
Page 16
Speaker and Subject
Theme: Nature
Page 16
Structure
Theme: Nature
Page 16

Theme: Nature
Page 16
Tone/ Word Choice
Theme: Nature
Page 16
This poem is describing a brief life of a friend
of the speaker. The speaker utilizes nature and its elements to demonstrate that he appreciates that even though his companion had a short-lived life it was not a waste of time due to it being worthwhile. He will always feel sorrow for the friend passing away but will be grateful that he or she at least did not have a long, dreadful, and boring one instead.
"It was the plant and flower of light,"
Spring, the sweet spring, is the year's pleasant king,
Then blooms each thing, then
maids dance in a ring,

Cold doth not sting, the pretty birds do sing:
Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-wee, to-witta-woo!

The palm and may make country houses gay,
Lambs frisk and play, the shepherds pipe all day,
And
we hear aye birds
tune this merry lay:
Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-wee, to-witta-woo!

The
fields breathe sweet
,
the daisies kiss our feet
,
Young lovers meet, old wives a- sunning sit,
In every street these tunes our ears to greet:
Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-wee, to-witta-woo!
Spring, the sweet spring!
Tone/ Word Choice
"To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere:"
Theme:Nature
Page11
The speaker has lost a dear friend that lived a short
but satisfying life. He is being optimistic towards the lost instead of being pessimistic. He overlooks the negative and realizes the positive fact that he passed away content. The subject in this case would be those that are in grief of losing someone or something important in their lives.
POV: Through out the beginning lines of the poem until the second to last it is third person because of the use of 'it' but he also utilized the word 'we' once which sets a first person plural POV.
Spring, the sweet spring, is the year's pleasant king,
Then blooms each thing, then
maids dance in a ring
, Cold doth not sting,
the pretty birds do sing
:
Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-wee, to-witta-woo!

The palm and may make country houses gay,
Lambs frisk and play
, the shepherds pipe all day,
And we hear aye birds tune this merry lay:
Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-wee, to-witta-woo!

The fields breathe sweet, the
daisies kiss our feet
,
Young lovers meet, old wives a- sunning sit,
In every street these tunes our ears to greet:
Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-wee, to-witta-woo!
Spring, the sweet spring!
Theme: Nature
Page 7
The entire poem demonstrates a state of
excitement and delight which welcomes the spring with open arms. This tone appliance attracts the listeners mind into the world of, "the sweet spring!" that is completely packed with ambitions, hopes, and love.
So forth issued the season of the
year
.
First, lusty Spring, all dight in leaves of
flowers
That freshly budded and new blooms did
bear
,
In which a thousand birds had built their
bowers

That sweetly sung to call forth
paramours
,
And in his head, as fit for warlike
stours
,
A gilt-engraven morion he did
wear
,
That, as some did him love, so others did him
fear
.

Then came the jolly Summer, being
dight
In a thin silken cassock coloured
green
That was unlined all, to be more
light
,
And on his head a garland well
beseen

He wore, from which as he had chafed
been

Thee sweat did drop; and in his hand he
bore
A bow and shafts, as he in forest
green

Had hunted late the leopard or the
boar

And now would bathe his limbs, with labour heated
sore
.
Then came the Autumn all in yellow
clad
As though he joyed in his plenteous
store
,
Laden with fruits that made him laugh, full
glad
That he had banished hunger, which to
fore
Had by the belly oft him pinched
sore
;
Upon his head a wreath, that was
enrolled
With ears of corn of every sort, he
bore
,
And in his hand a sickle he did
hold
To reap the ripended fruits the which the earth had
yold
.

Lastly came Winter clothed all in
frieze
,
Chattering his teeth for cold that did him
chill
,
Whilst on his hoary beard his breath did
freeze
;
And the dull drops that from his purpled
bill
,
As from a limbeck, did adown
distil
.
In his right hand a tipped staff he
held
With which his feeble steps he stayed
still
,
For he was faint with cold and weak with
eld
That scarce his loosed limbs he able was to

wield
.

The speaker in this poem is very
joyous and descriptive, while the subjects are the listeners that are able to hear this fantastic description of spring.
POV: First Person plural because he utilizes the words 'we', 'our', and 'ours'.
In this poem Edmund Spenser applies personification
to compare and describe the cycle of the seasons, in which he incorporates metaphors to correlate the four stations of the year to the life cycle of humans. The illustration of birth in "[l]usty Spring" to death in "Winter clothed all in frieze,.." portrays the transition from birth to death.
Imagery/sensory details:
This allows readers
to visualize the flowers beautiful and glorious life rather then the tree's unpleasant and dreadful one.
It is not growing like a tree
In bulk, doth make man better be,
Or standing long an oak, three hundred year
,
To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere:
A lily of a day
Is fairer far in May
Although it fall and die that night;
It was the plant and flower of light.
*
In small proportions we just beauties see,
And in short measures life may perfect be.
It is not growing like a tree
In bulk
,
doth make man better be
,
Or standing long an oak, three hundred year
,
To fall a log at last
,
dry
,
bald, and sere
:
A lily of a day
Is fairer far in May
Although it fall and die that night
;
It was the plant and flower of light
.
In small proportions we just beauties see
,
And in short measures life may perfect be
.
Analogy:

The tree and the flower stands for the
two different ways that you can live life. It shows the reader that you can either live a life dull and boring or exciting and enjoyable. This allows us to see that the authors friend died a short but accomplished life.

The speaker is being contemplative based
on the way we grow and what we accomplish in our lives while comparing humans to the seasons. The speaker is also calm as he thoroughly expresses what every season describes in our lives. The subject of this poem would be those reading or listening to this piece.

POV: Third person because he employs the words 'their', 'he', and 'his'.
Punctuation:
Ben Jonson employs commas and semi colons to slow down the poem. This is done so that the reader of the poem can really take the time to grasp onto his emotions.
Shift:
The poem began with the representation of aging and dying after a long lived life. As it continues it shifts into describing the beauty of a lily that even though its life was short it shined with all its might. This shift teaches the audience that the person who died lived a satisfying life.

Starts here
The tone in this poem is heart-rending and
sorrowful but transitions into Ben Jonson being at ease with his loss. This is done to show the transition of his grieving process and at the end finding peace within the situation.

"Or standing long an oak, three hundred year, to fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere."
- Sorrowful
"And in short measures life may perfect be."
- At peace
Rhyme Scheme:
Symbolism
: The "javelin" represents the fact that he is young and is ready to face anything in his path. Next, the 'bow and shafts' symbolize that he is growing as time passes and must work to put food on the table.The 'sickle' means that he is aging as the leaves fall and death is near. Last but not least, the 'tipped staff' demonstrates that he needs support because of his age, and the fact that death is just around the corner. This allows the audience to recognize and imagine the transition from young to old through out the poem.
Imagery
: These descriptions grant the readers with an image of what each season brings with its arrival.
Spring= Flowers, life, youth, love
Summer= Family, work, heat
Autumn= Food, thanksgiving, aging
Winter= Death, cold, snow
Personification
: This allows the reader to sense what each season has to offer and what it represents in our lives.
Extended Metaphor: The entire poem is a metaphor that thoroughly compares the seasons to the life cycle.
This makes the reader contemplate about their own precious life and what exactly they have been doing with it.
Hyperbole:
This exaggeration in 'Spring' accentuates the youthful state that he is in and the many things that he will accomplish in the future. While, the hyperbole in 'Autumn' describes what he has achieved in his life.

So forth issued the season of the year.
First, lusty Spring
,

all dight in leaves of flowers
That freshly budded and new blooms did bear,
In which a thousand birds

had built their bowers

That sweetly sung to call forth paramours,
And in his hand,a javelin he did bear,
And on his head, as fit for warlike stours,
A gilt-engraven morion he did wear ,
That, as some did him love, so others did him fear.

Then came the jolly Summer, being dight
In a thin silken cassock coloured green
That was unlined all, to be more light,
And on his head a garland well beseen
He wore, from which as he had chafed been
Thee sweat did drop;
and in his hand he bore
A bow and shafts
, as he in forest green
Had hunted late the leopard or the boar
And now would bathe his limbs, with labour heated sore.
Then came the
Autumn all in yellow clad
As though he joyed in his plenteous store,
Laden with fruits that made him laugh, full glad
That he had banished hunger
, which to fore
Had by the belly oft him pinched sore;
Upon his head a wreath, that was enrolled
With ears of corn of every sort, he bore,
And in his hand a sickle he did hold
To reap the ripended fruits the which the earth had yold.

Lastly came
Winter clothed all in frieze,
Chattering his teeth for cold that did him chill,
Whilst on his hoary beard his breath did freeze;
And the dull drops that from his purpled bill,
As from a limbeck, did adown distil.
In his right hand a tipped staff he held
With which his feeble steps he stayed still,
For he was faint with cold and weak with eld
That scarce his loosed limbs he able was to wield.
The
length
of the sentence could represent either a long or short life.
Ashley Ariza
Kristina Rodriguez
Betty Dheng
Marimar Mateo


Nature represents the life cycle along with all the emotions that come with life. For instance, happiness and melancholy.
Spring= Birth
Summer=Youth
Fall=Aging
Winter= Death

Style
a
b
a
b
cc
aa
Rhyme Scheme:
Rhyme Scheme:
Rhyme Scheme:
a
b
a
bb
c
b
cc
a
b
a
bb
c
b
cc
a
b
a
bb
c
b
cc
Throughout this poem, the speaker utilizes a reflective tone to symbolize his life to the changing seasons.
Spring
-Light and Joyful tone
-Represents a renewal of life.




Then came the
jolly Summer, being dight
In a thin silken cassock coloured green
That was unlined all, to be more light,
And on his head a garland well beseen
He wore, from which as he had chafed been
Thee sweat did drop; and in his hand he bore
A bow and shafts, as he in forest green
Had hunted late the leopard or the boar

And now would bathe his limbs, with labour heated sore.

Lastly came Winter clothed all in frieze,
Chattering his teeth for cold that did him chill,
Whilst on his hoary beard his breath did freeze;
And the
dull drops
that from his purpled bill,
As from a limbeck, did adown distil.
In his right hand a tipped staff he held
With which his
feeble steps he stayed still
,
For he was
faint with cold and weak with eld
That scarce his loosed limbs he able was to wield.
Summer
-Warm and Cheerful tone
-Represents youth
Autumn
-Cooler/ Calm tone
-Represents that life is ending soon
Winter
-Gloomy/ Dark tone
-Represents a sense of closure to life
So forth issued the season of the year.
First, lusty Spring, all dight in leaves of flowers
That
freshly budded and new blooms did bear
,
In which a thousand birds had built their bowers
That
sweetly sung to call forth paramours
,
And in his head, as fit for warlike stours,
A gilt-engraven morion he did wear ,
That, as some did him love, so others did him fear.
Then came the Autumn all in yellow clad
As though he joyed in his plenteous store,
Laden with fruits that made him laugh, full glad
That he had banished hunger, which to fore
Had by the belly oft him pinched sore;
Upon his head a wreath, that was enrolled
With ears of corn of every sort, he bore,
And in his hand a sickle he did hold
To reap the ripended fruits the which the earth had yold.
Effect of rhyme scheme:

The rhyme scheme is to emphasize the transition of tones throughout the poem.
Key:
Symbolism,
Imagery,
Hyperbole
Symbolism:
Lilies are most commonly used in funeral services which symbolizes in the poem the death of his beloved friend. This emphasizes the short life that he or she unfortunately had.
Full transcript