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LITERARY ELEMENTS OF LITERATURE

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Briana Wisniewski

on 28 September 2016

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Transcript of LITERARY ELEMENTS OF LITERATURE

LITERARY ELEMENTS OF LITERATURE
Literary Elements
Use the following literary elements to help you analyze a work of literature.
SETTING
WHERE the story takes place. Authors set their characters in a particular "world" of time, space, and culture.
MOOD VS. TONE
Be Careful!! Mood and Tone are VERY similar. Both deal with the emotions centered around a piece of writing.
POINT OF VIEW
(Who’s telling this story anyway?)
-the vantage point from which the story is told.
-determines how much we, the readers, know about the characters.

PLOT
The chain of related events that take place in a story.

Built around conflict, which is a struggle between opposing forces.

1ST PERSON
Narrator is a character in the story.

Narrator uses first-person pronouns, I, me, my, we, us, our to refer to himself or herself.

Narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of one character and speaks directly to reader.

3RD PERSON OMNISCIENT
Narrator does not participate in action of story.

Narrator does not refer to himself or herself.

Narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of all characters; readers get insight into several characters.

3RD PERSON LIMITED
Narrator does not participate in action of story.

Narrator does not refer to himself or herself.

Narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of one character, but readers are able to maintain some emotional distance from the character.

3RD PERSON DRAMATIC
Narrator does not participate in action of story.

Narrator does not refer to himself or herself.

Narrator is OBJECTIVE. He/She does not report on the thoughts/feelings of the character. This view point simply keeps the action moving forward.

"Fly on the Wall" Point of View
MOOD
The ATMOSPHERE or the AMBIENCE of a piece of writing (as a whole).

Mood is the feeling YOU (the reader) feel while you are reading.
TONE
The WAY feelings are expressed.

Tone is the attitude that an author takes toward the audience, the subject, or the character.

Tone is conveyed through the author's words and details.
TEMPORAL
TIME OF SPACE

TIME OF YEAR

TIME OF DAY
LOCALE
WHERE the action takes place.
CHARACTERIZATION
CONFLICT
EXTERNAL

MAN VS MAN
MAN VS. NATURE
MAN VS. SOCIETY
MAN VS. FATE/DESTINY
INTERNAL

MAN VS. HIMSELF
THEME
Time greatly impacts characters' motivation and action.
GEOGRAPHY

PHYSICAL OBJECTS

CLIMATE
TONE is the words.

MOOD is the feeling.
Exposition
Rising Action
Climax
Falling Action/Denouement
Resolution
Why do authors include conflict in their stories?
Protagonist vs. Antagonist
Main/Major vs. Minor
Round vs. Flat
Dynamic vs. Static
Stock/Stereotype Characters
**Two Methods of Characterization**


S
peech,
T
houghts,
E
ffect on others,
A
ctions,
L
ooks

In literature, THEME is a perception about life or human nature that the writer wants to share with the reader.
Themes can be revealed by:

- a story’s title

- key phrases and statements about big ideas

- the ways the characters change and the lessons they learn about life.

Symbolism
A symbol is a person, a place, an activity, or an object that stands for something beyond itself.

Imagery

Diction (Word Choice)
Register (Dialect)
Syntax (Sentence Structure)
Figures of Speech (Personification, Metaphor, Simile)
The medium through which authors tell stories.
STYLE
COLOR

NAME

ANIMAL
Irony
A contradiction between what is expected to happen and what actually happens.
Verbal Irony
Use of words to mean something different than what was actually said.
“Thanks for the ticket officer you just made my day!”
“I can’t wait to read the seven hundred page report.”
Dramatic Irony
When the audience is aware of something that the characters in the story are not aware of.
Situational Irony
When the exact opposite of what is meant to happen, happens.
There is however a difference between situation irony and coincidence or bad luck.

When someone washes his car and it rains, that is just bad luck; nothing led him or her to think that it would not rain. However, when a TV weather presenter gets caught in an unexpected storm, it is ironic because he or she is expected to know the exact weather changes.
Indirect
Shows a character’s personality through five different methods:
Direct
The narrator’s direct comments about a character

FORESHADOWING

A Literary Device Authors Use to Hint at Something That Is To Come
Direct vs. Indirect
Full transcript