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Untitled Prezi

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Psychology Adhd

on 15 July 2013

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ADHD
What is
A
D
H
D
?
The brain
How is a child evaluated for ADHD?
Medications and Treatment
A
ttention
D
eficit
H
yperactivity
D
isorder (ADHD)
A Walk Into the Past
M
elchior
A
dam Weikard (German Physican) wrote a book called "
D
er Philosophical Arzt"
According to Diagnostic and statistical manual 1968- "
H
yperkinetic Reaction of Childhood"
1980- Attention-Deficit Disorder
1989 it was changed to A
D
HD
Statistics
Difficulties With Self control
Impulse Behavior
VERY Active
It begins with....PARENTS OBSERVATION
CHILD BEHAVIORS
impulsivity

excitability
restless
aggressive
fidgety
hyperactivity
off task
inattentive
Other instruments used to evaluate a child?

-Barkley Home Situations Questionnaire
-Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL)
-Conners' Parent Rating Scale
-Scale of Behavioral Problems


Academic Performance Rating Scale
-Child Behavior Checklist (Teacher)
-Connors' Teacher Rating Scale
-Self-Control Rating Scale
-School Problem Inventory
-Teacher Rating of Academic Achievement Motivation Scale
-School Problem Inventory
-Iowa Conners Teaching (TRAAM)
Rating Scale (compares ADHD w/ ODD
-Comprehensive Teacher Rating (ACTeRS)
-SKAMP(10-item scale)

Studies from 1997-2006
a
ccor
d
ing to t
h
e Center for
D
isease Control (CDC)
Annual increase was by a Percent
Brain:
Grey matter
White matter
Neurotransmitters
References
parent loses temper often
verge of
excessive physical discipline
or harm to child
fatigued, exhausted, depressed in managing raising child
more time spent on
keeping child safe
than other parents
INTERACTION W/OTHERS
other children
do not like to play

avoided by peers
because excessive active, emotional, aggressive
adult caretakers observations

-
Downloading...
Boys were most likely then girls to be diagnosed with
A
DHD
Mothers education plays a role on child's A
D
HD
Hispanic children were less likely then non-
H
ispanic black and white children to have ADH
D

What type of professional
should a
parent call?
MEDICAL DOCTOR
CHILD PSYCHOLOGIST
Parent Surveys
& Questionnaires
SCHOOL
ADHD EVALUATION PROCESS
CHILD HAS A POSITIVE ADHD DIAGNOSIS

Physical evaluation
looks for other coexisting disorders
interviews parent

-conducts DSM-IV
-interviews parents
-meets w/child 3-6 X
-collaborates with school officials

Individuals with DisabilityAct (IDEA)
Number of children 3-17 years of age ever diagnosed with ADHD: 5.2 Million
Percent of Boys 3-17 years of age ever diagnosed with ADHD: 12.0%
Girls: 4.7%
Difference between normal and ADHD brain
-Conners' Parent Rating Scale
-Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL)
-school teacher
-school psychologist
-counselor
-administrators

Parents
Teachers
Barkley, Russell A. Taking Charge of ADHD: The Complete, Authoritative Guide for Parents. New York: Guilford, 1995. Print.
Ritalin
Cylert
Pemoline
Clonidine
antidepressants

Side effects
http://what-when-how.com/neuroscience/overview-of-the-central-nervous-system-gross-anatomy-of-the-brain-part-2/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuron
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7134/7882371814_982b3b632f_z.jpg
Neurotransmitter - Dopamine
Brain Cortex - Grey and White Matter
Neuron - Grey and White Matter
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children. (March 5th, 2013). Retrieved on July 10th, 2013 from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/adhd/DS00275/DSECTION=complications
Slide show: How your brain works. (March3rd, 2013.) Retrieved on July 10th, 2013 from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/brain/BN00033&slide=8
Nass, R., Leventhal F. (2010). 100 Questions and Answers About Your Child’s Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Jones & Bartlett Publishers
Decrease appetite
Insomnia
stomach aches
Headaches
Anxiousness

Ritalin

It stimulates the central nervous system, with effects similar to but less potent than amphetamines and more potent than caffeine. Ritalin has a notably calming effect on hyperactive children and helps them to focus better.
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/Sr10_237.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/Sr10_237.pdf
PARENT-CHILD interaction

DSM-IV Criteria for ADHD
I. Either A or B:
A.
Six or more of the following symptoms
of inattention have been present for
at least 6 months that is inappropriate for developmental level:

INATTENTION
1. Often does not give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in
schoolwork, work, or other activities.
2. Often has trouble keeping attention on tasks or play activities.
3. Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
4. Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties.
5. Often has trouble organizing activities.
6. Often avoids, dislikes, or doesn't want to do things that take a lot of mental effort for a long period of time (homework).
7. Often loses things needed for tasks and activities (e.g. toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools).
8. Is often easily distracted.
9. Is often forgetful in daily activities.

B.
Six or more of the following symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity
have been present
for at least 6 months, disruptive & inappropriate for developmental level:


HYPERACTIVITY
1. Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat when sitting still is expected.
2. Often gets up from seat when remaining in seat is expected.
3. Often excessively runs about or climbs when and where it is not appropriate
(adolescents or adults may feel very restless).
4. Often has trouble playing or doing leisure activities quietly.
5. Is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor".
6. Often talks excessively.

IMPULSIVITY
1. Often blurts out answers before questions have been finished.
2. Often has trouble waiting one's turn.
3. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games).
Wright, Jim. ADHD: A school-based Evaluation Manual. Retrieved on July 10, 2013 from http://www.interventioncentral.org
Barkley, Russell A. Taking Charge of ADHD: The Complete, Authoritative Guide for Parents. Ch. 6 Deciding to Have Your Child Evaluated for ADHD (pp. 103-110) New York: Guilford, 1995. Print.
Centers for Disease Control, CDC (2010, December) ADHD Symptoms and Diagnosis, DSM-IV Criteria for ADHD
Retrieved on July 13, 2013 from http://cdc.org/
Hill, B & Van Haren, J (2005), The ADHD Book, New York, NY: Pengiun Group Publishers.
Kutscher, M. (2008), ADHD, Living without Brakes. Philadelphia, PA: Jessica Kingsley Press.
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) Home | APA DSM-5. (n.d.). DSM-5. Retrieved July 7, 2013, from http://www.dsm5.org/Pages/Default.aspx
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