Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Multiliteracies Pedagogy

No description
by

Amy McMillan

on 5 August 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Multiliteracies Pedagogy

Means New Literacies.
MULTILITERACIES
Articles 1 - 5
Welcome to my
first ever
Prezi task.


What follows is an annotated account of ten reviewed articles relating to Multiliteracies Pedagogy. My purpose in this collation is to greater understand the place of new literacies in Education, to improve my teaching practice and to promote diversity in my class.

I hope you enjoy it!

Please email any feeback to u1027221@umail.usq.edu.au
Thanks, Amy.
New Pedagogies
Articles 6-10
Overview / Synthesis
ICT Reflection.
References / Credits.
Because New Communications
Students Using Technology. [image]. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/61943191@N05/5637527074/sizes/s/in/photostream/
"Developing Pedagogies for Multi-literacies"
Anstey and Bull (2006) provide an overview of the factors which influence the effectiveness of a teacher’s pedagogy when promoting a multiliterate curriculum. In their article “Developing Pedagogies for Multiliteracies”, the authors refer to the Productive Pedagogies framework and other case studies, emphasising the need for purposeful and explicit teaching strategies which encourage higher order thinking skills and application of knowledge across varied contexts. The impact of social environments on literacy practices is considered, alongside the need for a teacher to cater to the diversity of their students. Guidelines are provided for lesson development, implementation and evaluation (including effective ‘teacher talk’ techniques), which promote teacher reflection, and suggestions are made for ways to improve upon practice.
Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Developing pedagogies for multi-literacies.Teaching and learning multiliteracies: changing times, changing literacies (pp. 56-81). Retrieved from http://coursereadings.usq.edu.au/services/redirect.php?course=EDX3270&year=2013&sem=1&token=u1027221%3A1364190534000%3ALxPJkYMYqWVY8R19PvB41Q%3D%3D&uuid=d287a887-6bbf-0550-f1aa-3ec59e4d7fbd
"Practical Strategies: The Participatory Classroom."
Asselin, M., & Moayeri, M. (2011). Practical strategies, the participatory classroom: Web 2.0 in the classroom. Literacy Learning: The Middle Years, 19(2), Retrieved March 20, 2013,from

https://usqdirect.usq.edu.au/usq/items/640c6a6b-5a15-293f-8127-3da5b0edb994/1/?_int.id=3
Asselin and Moayeri (2011) note that as high users of web 2.0 technology the ‘Net Generation’ should be contributing to and creating these literacies, in a shift from a 'consumer' to a 'producer' of texts. In doing so, students develop participatory literacy skills such as criticality, metacognition and reflection, amongst other publishing and editing techniques which can help to reduce inequities across the population. Some implications of new literacies are discussed, such as the many possible interpretations of texts across the online environment, and the need to carefully select the words and images being used. Several web 2.0 tools are reviewed and suggestions are made on how to best utilise these to encourage creativity and collaboration from students.
Article 1
Article 2.
Article 3.
“A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: Designing Social Futures."
The New London Group (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies : designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review, 66 (1), 60-93. Retrieved from http://coursereadings.usq.edu.au/services/redirect.php?course=EDX3270&year=2013&sem=1&token=u1027221%3A1364434901000%3AucRQlqBW8wOvdnfhvzF6yQ%3D%3D&uuid=fbab6a24-9cd8-bcbe-dd5a-7573ed3af17a
The New London Group (1996) present a detailed report on the need for literacy education to embrace the cultural and social diversity of modern life to improve the learning experiences and future prospects of students. The Multiliteracies framework is based on theories which suggest that knowledge develops within social and cultural contexts, and that everyone is a designer of their own meaning. Four types of pedagogy are suggested, namely: Situated Practice, Overt Instruction, Critical Framing and Transformed Practice. In addition, strategies are provided for encouraging the use of meta-language amongst students which can enhance understanding in the six areas of making meaning; linguistic, audio, visual, gestural, spatial and multimodal.
Article 4.
"Multiliteracies: Teachers and
Students at Work in
New Ways with Literacy."
Healy, A. (2006). Multiliteracies: teachers and students at work in new ways with literacy. In R. Campbell & D. Green (Eds.), Literacies and Learners (pp 191-207). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia.
Healy (2006) describes the changes occurring to literacy practices and texts alongside the growing use of multimedia in society. Her chapter “Multiliteracies: teachers and students at work in new ways with literacy” takes on an almost liberationist view, whereby the future prospects of students are dependent upon the inclusion of new literacies in the classroom. Reference is made to
the social and cultural influences on interpretation, creation and use of literature, and several case studies are supplied which demonstrate this across societies. However, her discussion of multiliteracies seems somewhat restricted to the inclusion of digital media and information technologies in the modern classroom.
Article 5.
"Multiliteracies in Torres Strait : a Mabuiag Island State School Diabetes Project."
Osborne, B., & Wilson, E. (2003). Multiliteracies in Torres Strait : a Mabuiag Island State School diabetes project. The Australian Journal of Language and Literacy, 26 (1), 23-38. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.usq.edu.au/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=94a8e5cb-9efd-431e-80d6-1b27638e2bb2%40sessionmgr15&vid=2&hid=20
In their paper “Multiliteracies in Torres Strait: a Mabuiag Island State School Diabetes Project”, Osborne and Wilson (2003) demonstrate the effectiveness which an inclusive muliliteracies pedagogy can have in reducing the gap of educational achievement for Indigenous Students. The authors encouraged student motivation by making connections with the students’ lives, by including their cultural language in the process and by addressing the needs of their community. As such, students were able to build a literacy understanding based on their own world, and in doing so addressed curriculum outcomes over several key learning areas. Some of the teaching strategies encouraged in this report included using authentic learning with collaboration amongst students, as well as the provision of a welcoming educational environment.
Article 6.
"Using the Four Resources
Model Across the Curriculum."
Santoro, N. (2004). Using the four resources model across the curriculum. In A. Healy, & E. Honan (Eds.), Text next : new resources for literacy learning (pp. 51-67). Retrieved from https://usqdirect.usq.edu.au/usq/items/d06f93e2-b4b1-847a-8320-223533e9fedd/1/Santoro_2004_51.pdf.
Santoro (2004) encourages teachers to use the Four Resource Model to help students understand subject specific literacies which are essential in accessing the content of different curriculum areas. The author suggests that despite variation of text types across the board, many subject areas have ‘main genres’, and suggests that teachers should reflect on their units of work and map out tasks to ensure that each of the four roles of code breaker, text participant, text user and text analyst are being incorporated. In using students’ prior understandings with explicit teaching of text types from multiple perspectives, it is argued that students will identify the vocabulary, graphics, purpose and viewpoint of the texts being explored.
Article 7.
"Expanding the Four Resources
Model: Reading Visual and
Multi-modal Texts."
Serafini, F. (2012). Expanding the four resources model: reading visual and multi-modal texts. Pedagogies: An International Journal, 7(2), 150-164. doi: 10.1080/1554480X.2012.656347
Serafini (2012) aims to build upon the Four Resources Model (Luke and Freebody,1990, as cited in Serafini, 2012) to include the additional skills required when constructing meaning from multi-modal texts. In his adaptations to this original framework, Serafini (2012) suggests that a ‘reader-viewer’ adopts the roles of ‘Navigator’, ‘Interpreter’, ‘Designer’ and ‘Interrogator’ to create their own meaning from texts which involve much more than written language alone. Although these roles are quite similar to those suggested by Luke and Freebody (1990, as cited in Serafini, 2012), there is a stronger emphasis on the need for the ‘reader-viewer’ to understand visual literacy; including design elements, art theory, spatial composition, and how these can influence various socio-cultural perspectives across contexts.
Article 8.
"Breaking Down the Barriers: Using Critical Literacy to Improve Educational Outcomes for Students in the 21st century Australian Classrooms."
Sharp, K. (2012). Breaking down the barriers: using critical literacy to improve educational outcomes for students in the 21st century Australian classrooms. Literacy Learning: the Middle Years, 20(1), 9-15. Retrieved from http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.usq.edu.au/fullText;dn=189963;res=AEIPT
Sharp (2012) refers to literacy as a social construction to which meaning is both given and taken through cultural contexts. The author also suggests that literacy is closely linked to power and privilege, and that cultural differences often act as a barrier to meaning making and to success in education systems. It is recommended that by incorporating critical literacies and multiliteracies pedagogies, a teacher is encouraging their students to be analytical of texts as well as their school environment; thus revealing the 'hidden curriculum’ and reducing cultural barriers between home and school life. Teacher strategies are provided which include ongoing self reflection, adopting a facilitator role, using explicit questioning, engaging students in analytical activities and including multimodal texts with various perspectives.
Article 9.
"Using Multiliteracies to Facilitate Culturally Relevant Pedagogy in the Classroom".
Smolin, L. I., and Lawless, K. (2010). Using multiliteracies to facilitate culturally relevant pedagogy in the classroom. In D. R. Cole & D. L Pullen (Eds.), Multiliteracies in Motion. (pp.173-187). Retrieved from EBL Database.
Smolin and Lawless (2010) suggest that multiliteracies pedagogy must submerge students in culturally relevant social practices to maximise its effectiveness. This chapter discusses the strengths of inviting culture into the classroom, and how this student centred practice creates links between school and the community, and involves the class in authentic tasks which provide essential life skills. The authors categorise the required multiliteracies of a global society and emphasise the importance of being able to identify the currency, credibility and bias of different text types. Several pedagogical challenges are discussed, and it is recommended that teachers participate in ongoing professional training and tailor their lessons by finding out which issues are relevant to their students’ lives.
Article 10
"Literacies and Numeracy."
van Kraayenoord, C. E., & Elkins, J. (2009). Literacies and numeracy. In A. Ashman and J. Elkins (Eds.) Education for Inclusion and Diversity (pp. 235-271). Frenchs Forest, New South Wales: Pearson Education Australia
When discussing literacies and numeracy education in Australia, van Kraayenoord and Elkins (2009) analyse several of the difficulties which an educator can face when addressing diverse needs in these areas. The authors acknowledge that all forms of literacies are a social and cultural practice, and therefore agree that challenges related to student differences in language and culture, gender, motivation and assessment practices will present themselves in the classroom. In catering for this diversity, an educator can decrease the gap in educational outcomes and improve the overall self efficacy of their students. Details of strategies are provided which can inform teacher practice and planning, including the Universal Design for Learning, which provides students with multiple methods of receiving, expressing and engaging with information.
(Cope & Kalantzis,2009)
On review of the multiliteracies literature, it becomes apparent that what constitutes ‘literacy’ has changed dramatically over time as communication methods and employment requirements have changed (Cope& Kalantzis, 2009; The New London Group, 1996). Reference has been made to the need for people to speak ‘Multiple Englishes’, and be confident in comprehending and utilizing a variety of discourses across different genres, in order to be an active contributor to society (Cope& Kalantzis, 2009; The New London Group, 1996). In such technological times where many students are coined as “…Digital Natives….” (Prensky, 2001, as cited in Smolin & Lawless, 2010, p.175) it is essential that teachers utilise multimodal texts and a variety of genres in literacy education; providing opportunities for students to not only explore these, but to critically analyse them and become producers of such texts themselves (Asselin & Moayeri, 2011; Smolin & Lawless, 2010).
1.
There are many ways of being literate, and it is agreed that these multiliteracies are learned as a social practice, strongly influenced by culture and the individual needs or likes of a person (van Kraayenord & Elkins, 2009; The New London Group, 1996; Sharp, 2012). The multiliteracies framework suggests using Situated Practice, Overt Instruction, Critical Framing and Transformed Practice as pedagogical strategies, guiding learners to make meaning through the use of authentic tasks, scaffolding and critical thinking (Cope & Kalantzis, 2009; The New London Group, 1996). If these are utilized well and the teacher is aligning the lessons and assessment practices to the diverse needs of their students, gaps in cross cultural education can be lessened (Asselin & Moayeri, 2011, Sharp, 2012; van Kraayenoord & Elkins, 2009; Obsourne, 2003; Smolin & Lawless, 2010). One such example of this is provided in the work of Osbourne (2003) who demonstrated that Situated Practice and Overt Instruction strategies promoted the success of students who were highly engaged in culturally relevant tasks which involved their community, language, and multimodal texts.
2.
In multiliteracies pedagogy meaning is not taken from language or text, but is created by the reader who designs their own understanding based on knowledge, experiences and their interaction with the text (Cope & Kalantzis, 2009; The New London Group, 1996). It is recommended that teachers and students use metalanguage, and engage with texts in such a way as to access the different linguistic, visual, audio, gestural and spatial processes of information found within (Cope & Kalantzis, 2009; The New London Group, 1996). This aligns with Antsey & Bull’s (2006) effective pedagogy theory, as it requires higher order explicit discussions over varied contexts.
3.
In addition to this, Luke and Freebody’s (1990) four resources model (as cited in Serafini, 2012) is recommended so that readers take on the roles of Code Breaker, Text Participant, Text User and Text Analyst as they progress, to access different levels of information (Serafini, 2012; Santoro, 2004). Serafini (2012) suggests an update to the four resource model to reflect the multimodality of texts and the growing need for critical reflection on visual literacy, such as design elements and images.
4.
Overall, the literature emphasises the importance for effective citizens to be able to critically analyse texts; which is demonstrated by the similarities in the Text Analyst role and the Critical Framing pedagogy from different frameworks. Both of these strategies uncover hidden social contexts or bias in texts, encouraging people to acknowledge multiple perspectives and realise the power of language and manipulation (Santoro, 2004, Sharp, 2012). This aligns with the perspective that a multiliteracies approach to education provides students with the tools for success later in life, and helps to eradicate inequities across social and cultural differences (Healy, 2006; Sharp, 2012).
5.
In completing this task, I opted for challenge and set a personal goal for learning something new; creating a multimodal presentation using Prezi software. I believe it is important to keep updating ICT choices in the classroom to prevent students becoming bored, and I found Prezi to be different from programs I had used in the past.


I am satisfied with the finished product, as it demonstrates all I have learned about including and editing text, changing, moving or adding sounds, images and frames in the sequence. Most of this was learned through trial and error; however tutorial videos were available to help me through stages of confusion, such as when I struggled to change the name of my presentation or upload sound. At one stage I realised that I didn’t have enough graph space to include all the information I had intended, and that I was still following a similar format to that of Powerpoint. It took me a little while then to challenge myself further and utilize the zoom feature on Prezi to redesign the layout of the text, and change the level of engagement with the program for the viewer. It also turned out that Prezi did not have all the capabilities I had initially thought which meant I had to change my original plans as I progressed. This time consumption is something that will need to be considered when planning units including ICT, as students will be learning as they go. There is still much for me to learn in Prezi, such as the ability to invite editors to my presentation, as well as sharing on social networks and blogs.


When I next use this program it will probably be as a visual aid to support speech, with less text and more voice overs. I will also make sure that I complete and edit all written work in a different document before transferring it into my Prezi to make formatting easier, and prevent having to edit several documents at once. I would gladly utilize Prezi in my classroom, as it is an excellent tool for teachers and students to collaborate, collect, share and present information.
References:

Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Teaching and learning multiliteracies: changing times, changing literacies (pp. 56-81). Retrieved from http://coursereadings.usq.edu.au/services/redirect.php?course=EDX3270&year=2013&sem=1&token=u1027221%3A1364190534000%3ALxPJkYMYqWVY8R19PvB41Q%3D%3D&uuid=d287a887-6bbf-0550-f1aa-3ec59e4d7fbd

Asselin, M., & Moayeri, M. (2011). Practical strategies: the participatory classroom: Web 2.0 in the classroom. Literacy Learning: The Middle Years, 19(2), Retrieved March 20, 2013, from https://usqdirect.usq.edu.au/usq/items/640c6a6b-5a15-293f-8127-3da5b0edb994/1/?_int.id=3

Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). “Multiliteracies”: New literacies, new learning. Pedagogies: An International Journal, (4), 164-195. doi: 10.1080/15544800903076044

Healy, A. (2006). Multiliteracies: teachers and students at work in new ways with literacy. In R. Campbell & D. Green (Eds.), Literacies and Learners (pp 191-207). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia.

The New London Group (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies : designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review, 66 (1), 60-93. Retrieved from http://coursereadings.usq.edu.au/services/redirect.php?course=EDX3270&year=2013&sem=1&token=u1027221%3A1364434901000%3AucRQlqBW8wOvdnfhvzF6yQ%3D%3D&uuid=fbab6a24-9cd8-bcbe-dd5a-7573ed3af17a

Osborne, B., & Wilson, E. (2003). Multiliteracies in Torres Strait : a Mabuiag Island State School diabetes project. The Australian Journal of Language and Literacy, 26 (1), 23-38. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.usq.edu.au/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=94a8e5cb-9efd-431e-80d6-1b27638e2bb2%40sessionmgr15&vid=2&hid=20

Santoro, N. (2004). Using the four resources model across the curriculum. In A. Healy, & E. Honan (Eds.), Text next: new resources for literacy learning (pp. 51-67). Retrieved from https://usqdirect.usq.edu.au/usq/items/d06f93e2-b4b1-847a-8320-223533e9fedd/1/Santoro_2004_51.pdf.

Serafini, F. (2012). Expanding the four resources model: reading visual and multi-modal texts. Pedagogies: An International Journal, 7(2), 150-164. doi: 10.1080/1554480X.2012.656347

Sharp, K. (2012). Breaking down the barriers: using critical literacy to improve educational outcomes for students in the 21st century Australian classrooms. Literacy Learning: the Middle Years, 20(1), 9-15. Retrieved from http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.usq.edu.au/fullText;dn=189963;res=AEIPT

Smolin, L. I., and Lawless, K. (2010). Using multiliteracies to facilitate culturally relevant pedagogy in the classroom. In D. R. Cole & D. Lee (Eds.), Multiliteracies in Motion. (pp.173-187). Retrieved from EBL Database.

van Kraayenoord, C. E., & Elkins, J. (2009). Literacies and numeracy. In A. Ashman and J. Elkins (Eds.) Education for Inclusion and Diversity (pp. 235-271). Frenchs Forest, New South Wales: Pearson Education Australia.
Multimedia:

Animation of Woman Thinking and Getting an Idea. [Image]. Retrieved from
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=thinking&ex=2#ai:MM900323763

Computer With Skills. [Image]. Retrieved from
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=education+technology&ex=1#ai:MC900021356

Conga Drum Roll. [Audio Recording]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=drums&ex=1#ai:MS900388227

Hi! Text in Speech Balloon [Image]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=hi&ex=1#ai:MC900434915

Jigsaw Puzzle Pieces. [Image]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=jigsaw&ex=1#ai:MC900434854

Logical Short. [Audio Recording]. Retrieved from
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=bass+and+drums&ex=1#ai:MS910219198

Students At Computer. [Image]. Retrieved from
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=education+technology&ex=1#ai:MC900060335

Students Using Technology. [image]. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/61943191@N05/5637527074/sizes/s/in/photostream/

Xylo Hit 1. [Audio Recording]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=xylophone&ex=1#ai:MS900116623|mt:4|

Xylo Hit 2. [Audio Recording]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=xylophone&ex=1#ai:MS900116624

Xylo Hit 3. [Audio Recording]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=xylophone&ex=1#ai:MS900116625

Xylo Hit 4. [Audio Recording]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=xylophone&ex=1#ai:MS900116626

Xylo Hit 5. [Audio Recording]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=xylophone&ex=1#ai:MS900116627

Xylophone Up. [Audio Recording]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=xylophone&ex=1#ai:MS900388412

Xylo Slide Up. [Audio Recording]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/results.aspx?qu=xylophone&ex=1#ai:MS900069181
Full transcript