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Figurative Language

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by

Julie Ramer

on 28 August 2018

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Transcript of Figurative Language

Figurative
Language:

Simile
Comparing two different things or ideas by using the words "like" or "as"
Metaphor
compares similar things or ideas WITHOUT using the words "like" or "as"
Personification
Attributing human characteristics to inanimate objects, natural forces, animals, or ideas
alliteration
Assonance
Cliche
Imagery
Oxymoron
Irony
Hyperbole
Idiom
Onomatopoeia
Repetition of a beginning consonant sound within a phrase or sentence
Repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds found within or at the end of words and phrases
An expression that has been used so often that its meaning and impact are no longer effective
The use of figurative language to paint a sensory picture for the reader.
A word or words that sound like the action or thing they describe or represent.
What results when the actual outcome differs from what is expected
Combines two words of contrasting meanings to convey a single idea or thought
Situational Irony
occurs when a character or the reader expects one thing to happen but something else actually happens
Verbal irony
occurs when a writer or character
says one thing but means another
Dramatic
irony
An expression that is clear only to those who are familiar with the language of its origin and cannot be understood based on its literal meaning
low man on the totem pole
rubs you the wrong way
bury the hatchet
beat around the bush
whole nine yards
What do the following idioms mean?
1) My life is a dream
2) I am a rainbow
3) Time is money
4) The team captain is a rock

What is being compared in these metaphors?
What would you see, hear, smell, taste, or feel if you were in these pictures?
the contrast between what a character knows and what the audience knows
Every cloud has a silver lining.
She's like a kid in a candy store.
There are other fish in the sea.

Uses exaggeration to provoke strong emotion, to create humor, to make a point
1. Unfunny clown fish on Little Nemo
2. Sharks are friends of fish
3. Monsters in Monsters, Inc. are scared of children even though their job is to scare them
Silent scream Old news
Found missing Awful funny
Friendly takeover Ill health
Humane slaughter
Consonance
The repetition of consonant sounds within or at the end of words in a phrase or sentence
I will crawl away to the ball.
Toss the glass, boss.
He thrusts his fists against the posts and still insists he sees the ghosts.
Paradox
A statement that initially seems to contradict itself but, in fact, includes a fundamental truth.
Less is more.
War is peace. (1984)
I must be cruel to be kind. (Hamlet)
Euphemism
A polite word or phrase used in place of an offensive or crude word or phrase.
Kick the bucket...instead of dying
Downsizing...instead of firing
Thin on top....instead of bald
Pun
Uses similar words or identical sounding words to create an alternate meaning to the sentence in which it is used.
Parris: ...My, these books are heavy!
Hale: They must be; they are weighted with authority.

The elephant's opinion carries a lot of weight.

When a vulture flies, he takes
carrion
luggage.
Allusion
A direct or indirect reference to a significant person, event, time, work of literature.
I thought the software would be useful, but it was a Trojan horse.

When she lost her job, she acted like a Scrooge and refused to buy anything unnecessary.

He was a real Romeo with the ladies.
Analogy
Compares similar concepts, characters, or works of literature, so the reader better understands a difficult idea.
That movie was a roller coaster of emotions.

Life is like a box of chocolates; you never know what you're going to get.
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