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To Kill a Mockingbird Prezi

This prezi will go into detail about the symbolism, setting, and tone of the novel To Kill a Mockinbird.
by

Michael Curran

on 26 May 2011

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Transcript of To Kill a Mockingbird Prezi

To Kill a Mockingbird By Harper Lee Symbolism The Mockingbird The Mockingbird is a symbol of many things, and I believe it to symbolize Tom Robinson the strongest. The mockingbird strongly symbolizes Tom Robinson. The mockingbird is first mentioned in the story when Jem and Scout both get air rifles.
ATTICUS: I'd rather you shoot at tin cans in the back yard, but I know that you'll go after birds. Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.(119)
Miss Maudie goes into detail with Jem and Scout on why it is a sin to kill a mockingbird.
MISS MAUDIE: Mockingbirds don't do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don't eat up people's gardens, don't nest in corncribs, they don't do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.(119) Tom is related to the mockingbird in several diffrent ways.
First of all, Tom Robinson was innocent; he did not beat Mayella Ewell nor did he take advantage of her. Atticus was able to prove to the jury that Tom was innocent; Mayella was beaten on the right side of her face, but Tom has a left arm he is incapable of using. Mayella was not taken to a doctor to make sure she is okay, or to verify that the events of that night occured. Also, the Ewells had no witnesses other than themselves, so it was their word against Tom's. Because of that factor, he lost; it was the word of two white people versus the word of an African-American, who everyone believed to be liars, cheaters, and criminals. This was a losing battle from the start. Tom had lost the case and been sentenced to death, so he decided to make a run for it at the prison. The guards killed him by firing 17 bullets into him. Tom Robinson is the picture perfect image of the mockingbird. He did nothing wrong, , brought no one harm, just like the mockingbird. As a matter of fact, he helped Mayella by doing chores and favors free of charge for her, just like the mockingbird makes sweet music for us to enjoy. In the book it states that it is a sin to kill a mockingbird, and I believe that it was a sin to have killed Tom Robinson; he did nothing wrong, was wrongly convicted, and even though he tried to escape, that is not a reason to have killed a human being, regardless of their skin color. If they just wanted to stop him from escaping, they could have shot him in the leg once, not 17 times. Shooting him that many times wasn't to stop him from escaping, it was to kill him. Setting The setting of this story is in Maycomb, Alabama, during the Great Depression and an era of racism in the south.
SCOUT: Maycomb was an old town, but it was a tired old town when i first knew it. In rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the courthouse sagged in the square. Somehow, it wasw hotter then: a black dog suffered on a summer's day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square. Men's stiff collars wilted by nine in the morning. ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o' clock naps, and by nightfall were soft like teacakes with frosting of sweat and sweet talcum. People moved slowly then. They ambled across the square, shuffled in and out of the stores around it, took their time about everything. A day was twenty-four hours long, but seemed longer. There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go, nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boudaries of Maycomb county.(6) Setting The setting of this story is in the South, during a time of hardship and racism.
The setting is prevelant throughout the book; and the setting also played a part in the behavior of the characters. It's the South, in Alabama, in a small farming community. Many of its inhabitants are country folk; a family with seven children live behind a dump, another barters goods and services instead of using money as payment, the characters speak with a southern twang, many of the men wear a straw hat and a pair of overalls to court, it's one of those "everyone knows everyone" kind of towns, and some families get by by living off the fat of the land. Because of the time, place, and type of people that live in Maycomb, a high percentage rate of the people there are racist. Because of their upcoming and beliefs, when Tom Robinson is accused of beating and raping Mayella Ewell, many of the towns folk believe it is true. Even after Atticus is able to prove Tom's innocence, the hate in the hearts of eight jurors sealed Tom's fate from the moment Bob Ewell accused him of raping and beating Mayella, his daughter. Tone The tone of this story is somewhat naive, and very innocent. This is because the story is told through the eyes of a little girl, Scout, who is only seven years old when this is going on. She is too young to fully understand the trial, and is forced to grow up faster than she should have. Scout is very young, and sees the world looking through a pair of rose colored glasses. She sees the good in everyone, and cannot understand many subjects surrounding her life during the time of the book. She does not understand racism, or why people are gainst Tom Robinson and her father. When she doesn't comprehend a conversation, like when she attended her Aunt Alexandra's luncheon, she zones out. Scout thinks within her age; when she spoke back to the teacher in defense of Walter Cunningham and got in trouble, she saw it as Walter's fault, and took it out on him. During dinner with Walter, she was too young to know not to mock Walter's eating habits. Plus, Scout did not understand that she could not hang out with Walter because he is trashy or that she could not go to Calpurnia's house because Calpurnia was black. Scout cannot make these connections because she is so young, but she does grow and learn as the story progresses. SCOUT: Maycomb was an old town, but it was a tired old town when i first knew it. In rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the courthouse sagged in the square. Somehow, it wasw hotter then: a black dog suffered on a summer's day; bony mules hitched to Hoover carts flicked flies in the sweltering shade of the live oaks on the square. Men's stiff collars wilted by nine in the morning. ladies bathed before noon, after their three-o' clock naps, and by nightfall were soft like teacakes with frosting of sweat and sweet talcum. People moved slowly then. They ambled across the square, shuffled in and out of the stores around it, took their time about everything. A day was twenty-four hours long, but seemed longer. There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go, nothing to buy and no money to buy it with, nothing to see outside the boudaries of Maycomb county.(6)
SCOUT: It was summertime, and two children scampered down the sidewalk toward a man approaching in the distance. The man waved, and the children raced each other to him. It was still summertime, and the children grew closer. A boy trudged down the sidewalk dragging a fishingpole behind him. A man stood waiting with his hands on his hips. Summertime, and his children played in the yard with their friend, enacting a strange little drama of their own invention. IT was fall, and his children fought on the sidewalk in front of Mrs. Dubose's. The boy helped his sister to her feet, and they made their way home. Fall, and his children trotted to and fro around the corner, and the day's woes and triumphs on their faces. They stopped at an oak tree, delighted, puzzled, apprehensive. Winter, and his children shivered at the front gate, sillhoutted against a blazing house. Winter, and a man walked into the street, dropped his glasses, and shot a dog. Summer, and he watched his children's heart break. Autumn again, and Boo's children needed him.(373-374)
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