Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Sentence Basics

An intermediate look into the syntax and setup of sentences.
by

Harmony Uduhiri

on 2 August 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Sentence Basics

Chapter 31: Sentence Basics
Let's take a closer look
Most sentences simply state facts, conjectures, or arguments,
but sometimes they will want to give commands or ask questions.
Sentence Purpose
- forms a statement while providing information about the subject.
Declarative Sentence
a.He watches Sex and the City reruns.
b.He really likes television.
Examples
a. Can I tweet from your page?

b. He let me tweet from his page.
Your turn!
- forms a question about the subject.
Interrogative Sentences
a.Does he watch Sex and the City reruns?

b. Does she know those Apple Bottom jeans are so last year?
Examples
a. Can I go to the mall with Folandria?
b. I need to get the new Apple Bottoms.
Your Turn!
Simple Subjects and Complete Subjects
A noun and its modifiers
Subjects
Compound Subjects
It says something about the subject.
Predicates: Verbs and their objects or complements
- groups of related words that serve as building blocks of sentences on a larger scale than parts of speech.
Phrases and Clauses
- demand something of their subjects.
Imperative Sentences
a.Do not watch reruns of Sex and the City.
b.Give me the pizza if she’s not going to eat it.
Examples
a. I need you to get off of me.

b. Will you please leave me alone?
Your Turn!
I
gave
them the job right away.
Identifies an action that the subject performs or does to somebody or something.
- emphasizes a point or expresses strong emotion.
Exclamatory Sentence
a. I’m really looking forward to watching Sex and the City reruns with you!
b. She better eat that gosh darn pizza!
Examples
a. I've fallen and I can't get up!

b. What should I do for the next hour?
Your Turn!
Simple
- A noun or pronoun that names the topic of the sentence
Complete
-Simple subject plus its modifiers
Examples
1. Three six-year-old
children
solved the puzzle in less than five minutes.
2.
The
dog
ran over the fence.
Your Turn
The cat is in the hat.
Examples
Generous people over 40
always donate money to charities.
Your Turn
Dirty cars need a bath too!
Contain two or more simple subjects connected with a conjunction such as: and.
Original
thinking and bold design
are characteristics of her work.
Examples
Peanut butter and Oreos make a delicious snack.
Your Turn!
Simple
It is the verb of the sentence.
Complete
The verb and its modifiers, objects, or complements.
Examples
Examples
That song
sent chills down my spine.
Transitive
Delivered, signaled, said.
Examples
Intransitive
Describes an action by a subject, but not an action done directly to anything.
Examples
Hit, ran, sat
Appositives rename nouns or pronouns and appear right after the word they rename.
Appositive Phrases
Example:
One researcher,
the widely respected R. S. Smith
, has shown that a child's performance on such tests can be inconsistent.

Computers can rip,
or copy
, audio files
from CDs.

Example:
In this example, the
appositive
renames
the
verb
.

The instructor
,

amazing Professor
Camper,

has successfully taught her
students how to actively engage in text.

Let's test your skills..
Can
YOU
identify the appositive in
this sentence?

Now let's learn about absolute phrases!
Absolute Phrases
modify an entire sentence. They include a noun or pronoun; a participle; and their related modifiers, objects, or complements. They provide details or causes.
The actors took their bows,

their spirits lifted by the
applause.
Here's an example..
So what part of this sentence is the absolute phrase?
The girl smiled at her mother, her heart pounding with the excitement of being a newly-wed.
Now its your turn!
Nouns Phrases and Verb Phrases
Noun Phrases consist of a noun/noun substitute & its modifiers. They function as a subject, object, or subject complement in sentences.
Let's take a closer look!
Subject:
The ancient, dusty library book
was fragile
.
Object:
Michael Phelps swam
the dark, icy waters
of the English Channel
.
Subject Complement:
Ralph Lauren is
an iconic and classical fashion designer
.
Verbals
Verbals are words derived from verbs. They function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs, but they do
NOT
serve as verbs.
Let's examine the different forms
of verbals!
Verbal Noun:
Crawling
comes before walking.
Verbal Adjective:
Chris tripped over the
crawling
child.
Verbal Adverb:
The child went
crawling
across the floor.
Sometimes appositives name
other parts of speech.

also known as subordinate clause
they have a subject and a predicate and cannot stand alone as a complete sentence
dependent clauses
also called relative clauses
adjective clauses modify pronouns or nouns
adjective clauses
adverb clauses
noun clauses
elliptical clauses
other clauses
identifying dependent clauses
Phrases
Verbals may take modifiers, objects, and complements to form three kinds of Verbal Phrases

Participals
Gerunds
Infinitives
Participial phrases begins with either a present participial (ing) or a past participial (ed/en) Function as adjectives and Often utilizes commas
Ex.

Insulted by his comment, Elizabeth refused to dance.
always uses the –ing form of a verb as a noun & commas NEVER follow a gerund phrase that begins a sentence
Ex.

My hobby is cooking steak on the grill.
Infinitive Phrases use the infinitive form( to be/to go/ to live) of a verb. They function as adverbs, adjectives or nouns and can be subject, complement, or direct object of a sentence.
Ex.

His publisher made him finish his novel.
- a group of related words that lack a subject, predicate, or both
Example
"The house at the end of the street caught on fire."
a. "At the end of the street."
b. "Caught on fire."
Clauses
- a group of related words that include a subject and predicate
Dependent Clause
Independent Clause
- can stand as their own sentence
- cannot stand alone;
function in sentences as adjectives, adverbs or nouns
Example:
a. I slept while he drove.
b. It is cold even though it's still summer.
Example
a. I slept.
b. It is cold.
A closer look at what makes a sentence...a sentence.
Gerund Phrases -
Full transcript