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Dada: Art Movement Report

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by

Lana Sarkisian

on 17 March 2014

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Transcript of Dada: Art Movement Report

"L.H.O.O. Q," 1919 (ready-made) (left)
"Fountain" 1917 (ready-made) (right)
"The Chinese Nightingale" 1920 (photomontage) (left)
"Murdering Airplane" 1920 (photomontage) (right)
"ABCD" 1920 (collage) (left)
"The Spirit of Our Time" 1920 (assemblage) (right)
Marcel Duchamp
Raoul Hausmann
Max Ernst
$1.25
Saturday, March 8, 2014
Vol XCIII, No. 311
What did it influence?
First off, what is it?
Legacy of Dada
By the end of 1920, most protagonists migrated to Paris.



The result of Dada created another art movement, known as Surrealism.



Although Dada only lasted a few years, its impact is unforgettable.



If it's anti-art, why are we discussing their artworks?
What's All the Buzz About Dada?
Dada, or Dadaism, rejected reason and logic.

Dada is an art movement that began in Zurich, Switzerland in 1916.

The authorship of the name Dada has long been contested and there is no hard evidence to support any individual claim. In French, Dada means "hobbyhorse."

Dada influenced the developments of Surrealism, Installations, Action Painting, Pop Art, Happenings, and Conceptual Art.
What about the artists?
Some of the most important artists include Marcel Duchamp, Hugo Ball, Emmy Hennings, Jean Arp, Marcel Janco, Sophie Täuber, Richard Huelsenbeck and Hans Richter.
"Life and Work in Universal City, 12:05 Noon," 1919 (photomontage)
By:
George Grosz
(1893-1959) And
John Heartfield
(1891-1968)
What about the artists?
Some of the most important artists include Marcel Duchamp, Hugo Ball, Emmy Hennings, Jean Arp, Marcel Janco, Sophie Täuber, Richard Huelsenbeck and Hans Richter.
What about my opinion?
How can something not be considered as "art?" What is the dividing line between "art," and "anti-art?"
Full transcript