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Ocean of Artistic Ability

6 peices of art done during class with descriptions of each, what they represent, and what went into making them. Also, dimensions, media and ( ) of each piece of art.
by

Mara Isis

on 15 January 2014

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Transcript of Ocean of Artistic Ability

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Evolution
This is a still-life and value study of a school basketball. I have used the techniques Mrs. Mayne taught me in art this semester to create a realistic illustration of a basketball. Using the basic sphere drawing skills I learned last year, and the new shading and stippling skills she taught this year, to complete my drawing. It represents my desire to play a sport that I am incapable of being good at, due to my height. Being a sphere, the eye is drawn around it in a circular motion, taking in all of the prominent writing. I called this piece Evolution, because that is the name of the ball. (Plus, if I could EVOLVE a little more, maybe I would grow to be tall enough to actually play basketball!)
I utilized the techniques the video Mrs. Mayne helpfully provided us with, to make this drawing of an eye. It is a detailed drawing, representing how soulful eyes can be. Illustrated in charcoal pencil, the choppiness and lighter shade of the pencil strokes within the iris show that the colour differs from; the complete blackness and solidness of the pupil. The reflection of light is also there, along with a slight shading of the white of the eye around the corners. All this comes together in a look of clarity, also the name of this piece. The slight front of the brow is shown, along with the back. This draws the viewers’ eye around to the top of the cheekbone, shaded to reality. The cheekbone will lead the glance to the bridge of the nose, separate strokes of the pencil defining the line of shadow from the reflection of light on the nose. Your glance continues in a swirl, until the very center of the eye. The hair is merely there to bring the viewers glance back out of the picture, only to begin all over again with the brow. Everything around the eye has a likeness to reality in it: the eye brow and eye lid both follow the curve of the eye ball. The top of the nose appears three dimensional, and the shading between the side of the nose and the cheekbone was taken from my sister; the cheekbone itself is the exact lines and shadows as it is on my mother. It is only the eye that is not in the least realistic. That is what makes it such a strong piece of art: dramatic and dark, bold and yet, a beautiful combination with the truth that surrounds it.
Feathered Friend

This is a water colour pencil drawing of a chicken. It started as a gesture drawing, and then became more detailed as I studied the shape and texture of the feathers from a distance. The darkest pencil lines show where a) the feathers and b) the sunlight make shadows, and the lightest parts show where the light made a brighter spot on the animal. I added the hay underneath, because it seemed more realistic than the newspaper on the desk. The curved strokes I did with my brush smudged the pencil into feather-like shapes and fluff. The separate bunches of visible feathered areas draw your eye in a swirling pattern; starting from the center of the wing, and ending with the face. The curve of the black beak ends the swirling pattern, drawing the eye towards the hay at the bottom, and my signature. I have the light reflecting off of the beak, making it the most believably three-dimensional part of my drawing. The black eyes match the beak, and though they aren’t nearly as realistic, they go perfectly with it, making the face the indirect center of my picture.

The Masqued Maiden
Line Drawing/Sketch
charcoal pencil
8.5" x 11"
Clarity
charcoal pencil
8" x 2"
Evolution
The Grey Lady
One unit we did in art this year, was portraits. This is a portrait of Mrs. Kennerly, the VP of Port High. Done in charcoal pencil, I wished to convey the responsibility and severity her position in the education and betterment of the students here, puts upon her. It is called ‘The Grey Lady’ because 1) it is done in varying shades of grey; and 2) because though she can be friendly and nice, because of her job, she may also represent ‘punishment’ for many of the students that attend Port Colborne High. The eyes, nose and mouth were drawn with the new techniques Mrs. Mayne taught us this year.
Feathered Friend
Gesture Drawing
water colour pencil
8.5'' x 11''
The Grey Lady
Portrait
charcoal pencil
8.5" x 11"
By Mara Anderson - Pfaff
Value Study&Still Life
charcoal pencil
8.5" x 11"
Clarity
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