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"Moving Beyond Slides: Prezi as the Next-Gen Presentation Tool"

ARHU Faculty Tech Talk with Tom Geary. Friday, March 4, 2011, 1-2 p.m. KEY 1102J. College Park, MD.
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Tom Geary

on 14 December 2011

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Transcript of "Moving Beyond Slides: Prezi as the Next-Gen Presentation Tool"

Prezi as the Next-Gen Presentation Tool" "Moving Beyond Slides: ARHU Faculty Tech Talk
March 4, 2011
Tom Geary Back-up workspace:
http://prezi.com/vwtfmsazmocs/moving-beyond-slides-prezi-as-the-next-gen-presentation-tool-collaborative-space/ Winter Workshop 2011 Wednesday, January 12
11 a.m. - 12 p.m.
Tom Geary, Dept. of English Courses I've taught Learning goals and expectations vary by class This excerpt of a student's digital storytelling project is from Tom Geary's fall 2009 English 101 course. Image courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/amoeba/27377948/ “All modes of communication are codependent. Each affects the nature of the content of the other and the overall rhetorical impact of the communication event itself.” --- NCTE's 2005 Position Statement on multimodal literacies Assessment Image courtesy of http://digitalstorytelling.coe.uh.edu/7elements.html Assessing Visual Rhetoric For more information, see my Rhetoric Society of America presentation: http://prezi.com/5-j-skf8o2ot/ Which field of study's "visual rhetoric"? Art and art history
Pscyhology
Communications
English
Web design Whose vocabulary should be used? Kress and Van Leeuwen
Robin Williams
Faigley, George, Palchik, and Selfe
C.S. Peirce (semiotics)
Schneiderman and Plaisant sign, mode, medium, frame, site of display contrast, repetition, alignment, proximity symmetry, layout, emphasis, proportion, color feeling, action, information consistency, usability, feedback, closure Lester Olson: no substantive treatise exists Transduction projects, for example, helped students identify strategies for creating design-texts in new media spaces. There was a disparity in technical expertise, leading to questions of ethos based on content and/or aesthetics. There was also an emphasis on their motion of transduction from script or storyboard to final product. My @ENGL278Z students created a wide range of design-texts, something I couldn't as easily accomplish in a poorly designed hybrid or blended course. Blogspot Wix Vuvox Even a board game iMovie Various criteria and assessment tools were discussed with students prior to the project but there was no consensus for a visual rhetoric language. - Marc Prensky Digital natives Digital immigrants I took my first online class in 2001 as a sophomore in college. In 2005, I started teaching and noticed little advancement in teaching online, not so much in the technology but in the innovative exercises and collaborative activities. UMD: ENGL 101, ENGL 278Z
UMUC: WRTG 101, WRTG 291 Gradual process F2F Blended Hybrid Expectations Ever-evolving The class often helps me construct a contract for assessing participation. Always consider the student perspective I like to try new things for hybrid classes. AGENDA Sept. 27, 2010 1.) Wikis + Twitter
2.) Groups --> Assessing multimodality
a.) Rubrics
b.) Discuss group projects
3.) Digital storytelling + machinima
a.) Creating a multimodal narrative
b.) Why this mode? Transduction?
4.) Kairos + "scholarly" multimodal work HW - Read Wysocki excerpts Chpts. 7 + 9
- Read Burke excerpt
- Tweet #5 on readings
- Digital Remix fragment http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/ “All modes of communication are codependent. Each affects the nature of the content of the other and the overall rhetorical impact of the communication event itself.” --- NCTE's 2005 Position Statement on multimodal literacies Audience expectations delivery pacing tone file size and type colors This excerpt of a student's digital storytelling project is from Tom Geary's fall 2009 English 101 course. This excerpt of a student's digital storytelling project is from Tom Geary's fall 2009 English 101 course. This excerpt of a student's digital storytelling project is from Tom Geary's fall 2009 English 101 course. Photo (cc) courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/hummingcrow/3543041757/ Photo (cc) courtesy of http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctcvistaqueen/421690115/ Seven Elements in Four Minutes This excerpt of a student's digital storytelling project is from Linda Macri's fall 2009 English 101 course. Image courtesy of http://www.public.iastate.edu/~klfulton/MLAStyle.png How does one assess multimodality? Machinima Machine + cinema (sp)
Speedruns / Quake movies
Limitations Why create these movies?
HBO + Molotov Alva
Unpredictable AI results
Like Blair Witch without actors/cameras?
Usually in real time http://ghostrobot.com/directors/tommy-pallotta/in-the-waiting-line-zero-7.html http://www.storycenter.org/resources.html First things first enthymemes Unstated premises underlying an argument
Earlier stases, especially definition
Consider the example of "Silent Murder of Our Children" Maintaining a Positive Stance EWR 241-242 Note which premises your audience will agree with Which assumptions don't need explanation? Argue for, not against something why is this problematic? Workshop space These are participant workspaces. Feel free to explore Prezi's features in your circle. Courses I've taught UMD: ENGL 101, ENGL 278Z
UMUC: WRTG 101, WRTG 291 Gradual process F2F Blended Hybrid Ever-evolving "Prezi is a web-based presentation application and storytelling tool that uses a single canvas instead of traditional slides. Text, images, videos and other presentation objects are placed on the infinite canvas and grouped together in frames. The canvas allows users to create non-linear presentations, where users can zoom in and out of a visual map. A path through different objects and frames can be defined, representing the order of the information to be presented. The presentation can be developed in a browser window, then downloaded so that an Internet connection is not needed when showing the presentation." - "Prezi," Wikipedia.org Linear, slide-based, limited, pay Canvas, zooming, spatial, freemium Slide by slide Contextual relationships Affordances of using Prezi Limitations of using Prezi collaborative notetaking
invention process
flexibility and freedom
storytelling/concept
illustrate relationships
online storage (videos) presentation signups few "themes"/colors
occasional crashes
Internet access unless paid
zooming = motion sickness
time consuming if having fun five canons appeals eloquence Resources Example of a Prezi in scholarly research: http://www.technorhetoric.net/15.1/inventio/kyburz/index.html Sign up for an .EDU account:
http://www.prezi.com/ NY Times article on Prezis:
http://www.nytimes.com/external/gigaom/2009/09/28/28gigaom-prezi-presentations-with-a-twist-23809.html Prezi editing demo TechCrunch review:
http://techcrunch.com/2009/04/20/prezi-is-the-coolest-online-presentation-tool-ive-ever-seen/ Link to this Prezi:
http://prezi.com/y6rrtqjymtwh/moving-beyond-slides-prezi-as-the-next-gen-presentation-tool/ This is Tim's circle. Hello
this is Tanya's circle hello this is yh. English 101 Week 5 Agenda 1.) First Things First / Enthymemes
2.) Maintaining a Positive Stance
3.) Logical Fallacies
4.) Responding to Opposing Views 5.) Sample essay
a.) Parts of a full argument
b.) TSIS
---
6.) Blog post 7.) Essay #3 draft workshop
8.) Introduce Essay #4
9.) Jeopardy! Avoid writing your essay as a negative response State your thesis positively Focus on sources that agree with your thesis Refute or concede to others Logical fallacies Instances of misleading or deceptive reasoning. If your argument relies on any fallacies, it is in danger of being refuted. Argument to ignorance (hasn’t been proven wrong yet!)
Appeal to nature AND Either/Or
Argument ad nauseam (repetition) AND Ad populum
Appeal to tradition
Faulty analogy
Hasty generalization
Slippery slope
Banal claim
Circular questioning (Begging the question)
Straw man (Misrepresenting Opposing Positions)
Errors in causal argument AND Non sequitor / Red herring http://www.nizkor.org/features/fallacies/ http://www.logicalfallacies.info/ Responding to opposing views Refutation Concession Bridging Qualifying -Anticipating and responding to reader’s objections, challenges, and questions. Imagine what others’ points of views would be on the topic and anticipate how they would argue. - Acknowledge readers' concerns Assert that they are wrong and argue against them.
Do not do this dismissively, though. What is an example of this?
Reasoned argument is much more credible. - In academic arguments, you can’t just express one opinion. Not strong. Problems with other arguments: unethical, unreasonable, logically flawed, impractical. Logical fallacies. Granting value or credit to an opposing claim. Deal with complexities.
Good strategy in the right rhetorical situation.
Some opposing points have value.
Also help give the arguer credibility for knowing the opposing argument. Acknowledge the limits of one’s claims. Related to concessions.
“I’m not saying that x, but y.” “Granted, x, but y.”
Helps prevent extreme claims.
Words: perhaps, seems, maybe, could and might.
Don’t overqualify or you might lose intensity. Sample Essay Look for the following: They Say, I Say
Parts of a Full Argument
Responses to Opposing Views
Enthymeme/premises
Logical fallacies
Thesis statement
Way(s) it addresses the audience
Argument paragraphs
Audience analysis
Exigence
Rhetorical appeals BLOG POST You've been assigned a topic.
Write 250 words on how that rhetorical strategy functions in the sample essay.
Use examples from the essay. Essay #3 Draft workshop Essay #4: Final Research Paper 20 sources (cited and/or consulted)
7 pages double-spaced
Full audience analysis
Argue for your own position "the penultimate session" This is Abram's circle Nov. 17, 2010 Agenda 1.) Presentation preparation
2.) Draft workshop
3.) Assignment Q+A
4.) Blogwatching (optional) HW - 5-minute presentation on Design-Text
- Last assigned wiki page
- Tweet reply #12
- Design-Text due Nov. 29 Blogwatching Which findings will most contribute to your Design-Text or Final Research Project? How would you assess the blog you're following as a source? How does it differ from a typical newspaper? Do you feel like a part of the readership now? In what ways does the blog you're following differ from other blogs, especially your own for this class? What MOST makes a blog successful? The writing? The content and niche audience? The images? The community? Presentations Sign-ups Monday, Nov. 22 Monday, Nov. 29 2:03 - 2:10: Isaac Hirsch
2:10 - 2:17: John McDowell
2:17 - 2:24: TC Gambrill
2:24 - 2:31: Stephen Lee
2:31 - 2:38: Sydney Rende
2:38 - 2:45: Indigo Potter
2:45 - 2:52: Kayleigh Poulsen
2:52 - 2:59: Manda Maines 2:03 - 2:10: JC Noble
2:10 - 2:17: Joe Toth
2:17 - 2:24: Sander Marques
2:24 - 2:31: Maitreyi Agashe
2:31 - 2:38: Jessica Beinert
2:38 - 2:45: Caitlin Zentgraf
2:45 - 2:52: Adam Jacobs
2:52 - 3:00: Gary Weiser
3:00 - 3:08: Brian Kang Draft workshop Assignment Q+A Do you have questions about the Design-Text assignment? Here's your last chance to ask before we move into presentations! - Who is your target audience? Knowing the answer to this question is key to immersing yourself into that discourse community. - What results does the Immersion yield? How does the author's "Immersion" part of the project tell us something new. Is it unique? Interesting? - Is this Design-Text believable? Is is operational? Is it visually in line with others in its genre when side by side? How could it be more successful? The Design aspect of the assignment is important. How would you assess the visual argument presented? Are the Immersion findings highlighted by the Design-Text? How are these two complementary? - Strengths/weaknesses How well does this project fit the genre conventions of that type of Design-Text? If it's a Web site, what genre conventions are most important? What CONTEXT (think contextualism) does it fit? As a typical viewer, what did you feel were the strengths and weaknesses? Have you thought through all of the required steps of the assignment? Presentation Guidelines How to give a strong presentation - Approximately 5-7 minutes in length
- Show us your Design-Text (draft form is fine)
- Discuss the Immersion hypothesis and findings
- Note your target audience and discourse community
- Share your design strategies
- A PowerPoint or Prezi can be used, but most importantly, we want to see the Design-Text in whatever stage it's in
- You shouldn't have to read anything. This is a somewhat informal discussion about your work; however, you should have a clear plan of action and not be at a loss for words. You're the expert here
- There should be some formality; you're imagining this as a "pitch" of sorts for your Design-Text
- Note how this will help out your larger Final Project Know your rhetorial situation. Know your audience. From http://www.aresearchguide.com/3tips.html When you are presenting in front of an audience, you are performing as an actor is on stage. How you are being perceived is very important. Dress appropriately for the occasion. Be solemn if your topic is serious. Present the desired image to your audience. Look pleasant, enthusiastic, confident, proud, but not arrogant. Remain calm. Appear relaxed, even if you feel nervous. Speak slowly, enunciate clearly, and show appropriate emotion and feeling relating to your topic. Establish rapport with your audience. Speak to the person farthest away from you to ensure your voice is loud enough to project to the back of the room. Vary the tone of your voice and dramatize if necessary. If a microphone is available, adjust and adapt your voice accordingly. Don't read from notes or read your PowerPoint/Prezi/Web site. Please don't go over your alloted time limit. Have a clear plan of action Outline what you're going to present to us
Plan time for each section: introduction, body, conclusion
Expect technical difficulties and be prepared Visuals are of the utmost importance But don't view them as a crutch Communicate with your audience You can ask questions, be humorous, and be creative Don't forget your design principles! Colors, image vs. text, readability, Faigley's terms How might you use the terms from our HW reading (Faigley, George, Palchik, Selfe) in constructing your Design-Text or Final Project? How might you use the terms from our HW reading (Faigley, George, Palchik, Selfe) in constructing your Design-Text or Final Project? balance classification compare and contrast description emphasis metaphor narration pattern point of view proportion unity balance classification compare and contrast description emphasis metaphor narration pattern point of view proportion unity Prezi key features intuitive wheel paths and multimodality Embedding Frames this is yh 2.
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