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Little Red Riding Hood - Literary Terms

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Kenzie Wittmer

on 6 December 2015

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Transcript of Little Red Riding Hood - Literary Terms

Setting
When Little Red Riding Hood tells the wolf where her Grandmother's house is, she is telling us the setting: "A good quarter of a league farther on in the wood. Her house stands under the three large oak-trees, the nut-trees are just below. You surely must know it."
Setting is the location (including the date and time) a story takes place. This helps the reader visualize the story more effectively.
Dramatic Irony
When the author reveals the wolf's thoughts about his plans to eat Little Red Riding Hood, he is showing us what he's about to do/what is about to happen: "The wolf thought to himself, 'What a tender young creature. What a nice plump mouthful, she will be better to eat than the old woman. I must act craftily, so as to catch both."'
This is dramatic irony because we know the wolf is evil and Little Red Riding Hood doesn't. This builds up the suspense and keeps us interested because we want to know what happens to Little Red.
Point of View
Climax
When the wolf swallows Little Red Riding Hood, you feel the most emotion in the story: "And scarcely had the wolf said this, than with one bound he was out of bed and swallowed up Little Red Riding Hood."
This is the climax because the climax is when you get the most emotion and get excited. Without the climax, the reader(s) would get bored and wouldn't have a lot of emotion while reading.
Tone
When the author talks about Little Red Riding Hood looking at the flowers, it gives a peaceful, calm tone: "[When Little Red Riding Hood] saw the sunbeams dancing here and there through the trees, and pretty flowers growing everywhere, she thought, suppose I take grandmother a fresh nosegay."
This is tone because tone is when the author uses adjectives to create an additude (good or bad). The tone helps the reader understand how the character views things to be. Tone also helps the reader visualize the story and in this case, the setting.
Theme
The theme of Little Red Riding Hood is to listen to what your parents tell you. This is because Little Red Riding Hood's mother told her, "when you are going, walk nicely and quietly and do not run off the path," and when she didn't follow that rule, she got eaten by a wolf.
This is theme because theme is the moral of the story and what you are supposed to learn from it. The theme helps the reader learn from the story (in this case, to listen to your parents) and take something from it (even if the theme isn't very easy to understand).
Conflict
When Little Red Riding Hood defeated the wolf for the last time, it was an example of conflict: "Little Red Riding Hood [brought the sausage]. Then the smell of the sausages reached the wolf, and he sniffed and peeped down, and at last stretched out his neck so far that he ... began to slip, and slipped down from the roof straight into the great trough, and was drowned."
This is conflict because conflict is when the protagonist and the antagonist finally fight. Conflict keeps the reader interested and it also can help the reader to understand more about the characters.
Personification
When Little Red Riding Hood met the wolf, the wolf said "Good day, Little Red Riding Hood."
This is personification because personification is when animals of objects are given human qualities or traits. It makes us worried because wolves are known to be very dangerous, and if this (speaking) wolf is a character, he's bound to be dangerous.
Foreshadowing
When Little Red feels uneasy in the cottage, it warns you about what's going to happen: "she had such a strange feeling that she said to herself, oh dear, how uneasy I feel to-day, and at other times I like being with grandmother so much."
This is foreshadowing because she feels uneasy about doing what she's about to do because she thinks something bad is about to happen. Foreshadowing helps the reader understand what is going on and he/she will know what to expect
Kenzie Wittmer
When the narrator introduces Little Red Riding Hood to us, he/she says, "Once upon a time there was a dear little girl." This shows us the point of view because the introduction is "Once upon a time," which tells us that someone not in the story is telling us the story.
Point of view is the position that the narrator is in when he/she is telling the story. This helps the reader understand the other characters' perspectives and not just from Little Red's point of view.
Works Cited
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"Little Red Riding Hood Illustration." Digital Image.
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"Green State Forest Lower Trail." Digital Image.
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"Mexican wolf pup." Digital Image.
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Kaiketsu. "Little Red Riding Hood." Digital Image.
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"Little Red Riding Hood Tree." Digital Image.
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TheBookFairy. "Little Red Riding Hood and Wolf." Digital Image.
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Ber'Zophus. "Hungry Arctic Wolf." Digital Image.
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Theornamentalist. "Black and White Little Red Riding Hood." Digital Image.
Wikimedia
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"Red Riding Hood." Digital Image.
Wikimedia
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Little Red Riding Hood
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