Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Copy of Richard E. Miller

No description
by

Victoria Acton

on 12 November 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Copy of Richard E. Miller

Prince of Darkness
Joining The Liars Club
On Meditative Writing and Its Consequences
“The Dark Night of the Soul”
by Richard E. Miller

An Experience in Institutional
Autobiography
Presented by Victoria, Cesar, Desarae,
Trevor, Christina,Lauren,and Michelle.

A Softer Introduction to Our Topic:
Ice Breaker
Moving on to...
Following the Word
Section Discussion:
How does each section of the article inform Miller’s understanding of different attitudes towards reading and writing?
Worlds End, Worlds Begin:
The Future of the Humanities
Lecture was given on February 2007 by Richard E. Miller himself at Clemson University.
What is the value of the humanities (specifically reading and writing) in a world full of violence and tragedy?
Quick Write!
Post- Hurricane Katrina
Think about it....
Before we go into the text...
"Humanities can provide a secular basis for
hope
"
- Richard E. Miller
Ending with........
Remember the classroom we saw at the beginning of this presentation......
"Somewhere in America"
By: Belissa Escobedo, Rhiannon McGavin, and Zariya Allen
Question 4:
"... we no longer live in a world where human action can be explained. We have plenty of information; it just doesn't amount to anything" (Miller 426).
"Who McCandless is and what becomes of him are, it turns out, intimately connected to the young man's approach to reading-both what he chose to read and how he chose to read it" (Miller 429).
How does Miller describe the concept of the "institutional autobiography" (442)?
Class discussion to follow...
Question 1:
Question 3:
Question 2:
How does Miller write as a political Practice?
In the last chapter of Miller's
Writing at the End of the World
(2005), he writes:
While the assessments, evaluations, proposal, reports, commentaries, and critiques I produce help to keep the bureaucracy of higher education going, there is another kind of writing I turn to in order to sustain the ongoing search for meaning in a world no one controls. This writing asks the reader to make
imaginative connections
between disparate elements; it tracks one path among many possible ones across the glistening water. This writing is the lifeblood of the
humanities in action
(196)
Considering your written response to the essay, does Miller's interpretation of the humanities provide any tangible suggestions for how we, as future English teachers, might be able to empower students to use writing as a way to connect the academic with the personal? What can we do in our curriculum and instruction to encourage students to make "connections that count" (198)?
Moreover, how can we accomplish this when Common Core Standards advocate what Peter Rabinowitz calls "Zombie New Criticism" (qtd. in Appleman, Smith, and Wilhelm 21)?
In Kelly Gallagher's
Readicide
(2009), he writes about the meaningful experience of reading books:
Kenneth Burke... says the reason young people should read books is that it provides them with "imaginative rehearsals" for the real world. When children read books, Burke argues, they are not just reading stories. They are being given an opportunity to understand the complex world they live in (1968). Books enable adolescents to begin wrestling with those issues that remain universal in our lives... In an increasingly complex world, our students are in desperate need of these 'rehearsals,' and books are the perfect resource to foster this kind of thinking. (66)
How does Gallagher's writing align with Miller's thoughts? What kind of practical teaching methods does Gallagher suggest in order to combat this dilemma of the value of humanities
When I am back in the classroom, I work at getting the shidents to use
their writing not just as a tool for making arguments, but also as a lens
for exploring complexity and a vehicle for arriving at nuanced understandings
of a lived reality that is inescapably characterized by ambiguities,
shades of meaning, contradictions, and gaps
"If there is to be lasting hope for the future of higher education, that hope can only be generated by confronting our desolate world and its threatening, urgent realities. The only way out is through" (Miller 442).
"...the [fact that] memoirs, in general return to scenes of violence and violation is worth pondering, for here one finds evidence of one way in which writing continues to matter at the current moment; the memoir allows one to plunge into the darkness of the past; it provides means both for evoking and for making sense of the past; and it can be made to generate a sense of possibility, a sense of that past; and it can be made to generate a sense of possibility, a sense that a better, brighter future is out there to be secured" (Miller 437).
"The body and its voyage through time are without interest...The mind is where the action is" (Miller 436).
Millers mission in teaching: I work at getting the students to use
their writing not just as a tool for making arguments, but also as a lens
for exploring complexity and a vehicle for arriving at nuanced understandings
of a lived reality that is inescapably characterized by ambiguities,
shades of meaning, contradictions, and gaps
Full transcript