Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Professional Learning Communities and Exceptional Schools

No description
by

michele wilson

on 18 December 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Professional Learning Communities and Exceptional Schools

Exceptional Schools Professional Learning Communities What is a Professional Learning Community? The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement defines Professional Learning Communities as an ongoing process used to establish a schoolwide culture that develops teacher leadership explicitly focused on building and sustaining school improvement efforts. Generally, PLC's are composed of teachers, although administrators and support staff routinely participate (Bolam, McMahon, Stoll, Thomas, & Wallace, 2005; Huffman, 2000). In some schools, PLC's are extended to community members and students, as appropriate (Stoll, Bolam, McMahon, Wallace, & Thomas, 2006; Stoll & Louis, 2007). http://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/6064705/plc All Things PLC Follow the link below and visit a wonderful collaborative, objective resource for educators and administrators who are committed to enhancing student achievement. http://www.allthingsplc.info/ A Professional Learning Community in Action! Here is a sample PLC wordle and a link to a PLC wordle that I created using wordle.net. Use the notes that you took during the "PLC in Action" video to create a wordle about the PLC that you observed in the video. You can either create a wordle on paper or you can use the website to design a 21st century wordle. Include a minimum of ten words that represent what you viewed the educators doing during their meeting. = Knowledge can be built and shared when educators work together in professional learning communities. Diane Wood, author of the article "Professional Learning Communities: Teachers, Knowledge, and Knowing" suggest that PLC's offer teachers the resources that they need to move away from being passive recipients and begin to approach teacher professionalism differently. Try this PLC activity with some of your colleagues. Part III: Post-visitation reflections
 
1) What have you learned about how others might perceive your room?
 
 
 
 
 
2) As the year progresses, what would you like to do to change or enhance your room?
 
 
 
 
3) Is your room conducive to the kind of instruction you want to provide, or does it create obstacles? Explain briefly.
   

 
 
Part II: The visitation
Record the observations of your group members about the following topics as they visit your room.
 
1) What is on the walls? Does what is on the walls link to or enhance instruction in any way?
 
 2) Look around the room. Does it give the students any insight into their teacher/teachers?

3) By looking at the arrangement of the furniture in the room, what conclusions might you draw about the type of instruction that will be going on? PLC Activity: What Does Your Room Say About You and Your Instructional Goals?
 Students gain in impression of you and what type of learning environment you are striving to create by looking around your room. For this activity, you are first going to answer the questions in Part I. Then you are going to visit each group member’s classroom and give your honest impressions. The person whose room is being visited will record the other group members’ reactions in Part II. At the conclusion of the visits, each person will complete Part III and discuss the results with the group.
Part I:
What are you trying to say with your room? Please answer these two questions before you begin the next part of the activity.

1) What is the impression that you want your room to give to your students?

2) How does the arrangement of the furniture match the kind of teaching you plan to do? (For example, if your class involves a lot of group work, does the arrangement facilitate that?) Part III:
Post-visitation reflections
 
1) What have you learned about how others might perceive your room?
 
2) As the year progresses, what would you like to do to change or enhance your room?
 
3) Is your room conducive to the kind of instruction you want
to provide, or does it create obstacles? Explain briefly.
  http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=24803 Challenges with Professional Learning Communities! Initial enthusiasm and sense of a "shared vision" often diminishes over time. It is often difficult to find time to have quality PLC meetings. Some PLC participants have difficulty sharing their beliefs if they are in a PLC group with outspoken members. IF your PLC looks like this then you are probably doing something wrong. “Teamwork is the ability to work together toward a common vision. The ability to direct individual accomplishments toward organizational objectives. It is the fuel that allows common people to attain uncommon results.” ~ Henry Ford
Full transcript